Skip to main content

Full text of "The Modern Screen Magazine (Nov 1930)"

See other formats


^V^fltefcW \ .^V-MJik'.V /. , iy*v > *. .aV^'^ 



Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 




Packard Campus 
for Audio Visual Conservation 
www . I oc . g o v/a vco n se rvat i o n 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 

www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 



V>\1 



~<r». 



fHE MODERN 







Magazine 









■FGARBO'S 

i | HIDING 
PLACE 



EAVESDROPPING ON 

WILL ROGERS 



THE NEW IT 
by 

ELINOR CLYN 





Noble Lady Hair Nets 

Insure The Well-Groomed Coiffure 
That Is Indispensable to 1930 Chic 



Arrange your hair as it becomes you best. Make 
a flattering frame for your eyes... your face. Then 
let a Noble Lady Hair Net. ..so fine and soft. ..keep 
your coiffure just as you arranged it from early 
morning until late at night. For the perfect groom- 
ing that is ever the badge of chic . . . Noble Lady 
Hair Nets are indispensable! 

Two sizes. Full size for long hair. Special size for 
bobbed hair. All colors including grey and white. 
A splendid value, typical of the Kress Stores. 




H AI R N ETS 

3 pgr J&S^r 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY AT 

KRESS 




The Modern Screen Magazine 





f Liliom'\ 
strangest 
strongest, 
saddest of 
love stories. 
Farrell in his 
greatest role as 
a carnival barker, 
darling of the girls. 



Who is the most popular 
man in the world — Lind- 
bergh? Prince of Wales? 

Motion picture fans in America's 
ttvo largest cities through their 
ballots cast with those great news- 
papers, the Chicago Tribune and 
New York Daily News, voted 

CHARLES FARRELL 

the most popular man in the movies 

Even better than in "7th Heaven" with the added 
realism of sound, you'll thrill to his performance as 

LILIOM 

Franz Molnar's 
striking stage success 

with 

ROSE HOBART 
H. B. WARNER 
Estelle Taylor 
Lee Tracy 



Directed by 

FRANK BORZAGE 
only director who has 
twice won the Photo- 
■Bl play Medal. 



Ask at your favorite theatre 
. w hen they wi ll show thi s 



v 





^Dramatic 

Trium ph 



SEP 



22 



©C1B 85689 



THE MODERN 

SCREEN 



Magazine 



FEATURES 



Elinor Glyn 16 
Bob Moak 26 
Jerome Beatty 30 
Robert Fender 34 
Walter Ramsey 37 
38 



The New "IT" (Illustrated by Russell Patterson) 

The screen mirrors the new type oj sex appeal 

Garbo's Hiding Place 

A glimpse of the Great Greta's latest hermitage 

The Big Eight of Hollywood 

The facts about the eight most successful extras 

Eavesdropping on Will Rogers 

When Will Rogers has something to say, listen! 

The Unknown Hollywood 

The startling discovery about "a certain Mr. Thome" 

Good-bye, Lon 

Farewell to the screen's greatest master of make-up 

An Open Letter to Clara Bow Adele Whitely Fletcher 40 

A few vital words to Clara, spoken from the heart 

Little Liar (Fiction) (Illustrated by Harve Stein) Hagar Wilde 44 

Often the lie that is easier not to tell must be told 

Their Real Names Gordon R. Silver 46 

// is amazing how few stars retain their own names 

Alice in the Looking Glass Thyra Samter Winslow 48 

The famous writer considers the ever-youthful Alice Joyce , 

Hollywood After Dark Edwin Anthony 51 

The film capital at night in picture and story 

Lucky Thirteen " Herbert Cruikshank 56 

Kay Francis has a lot of faith in that number 

We Like Hollywood Carroll and Garrett Graham 60 

(Illustrated by Walter Van Arsdale) 

The authors of "Queer People" confess 



Garbo, the Athlete 

Number one of "Little Impressions of Big People" 

"Am I My Brother's Keeper?" 

The many things they do for their families 

The Gifts They Get 

Fans send their favorites amazing things 

Close Up 

An unusual pen picture of Richard Barthelmess 

Matters of Policy 

The stars'* insurance policies have unusual clauses 



Walter Ramsey 73 
Jane Stewart 74 
Harriet Marsh 92 
Joseph Henry Steele 98 
Mary Sharon 101 



DEPARTMENTS The Modern Screen Directory: Players 

What every fan must know 

Pictures 

Film Gossip of the Month 

News and gossip items without equal 

Know Them? 

A page of clever caricatures 

Hollywood Highlights 

Some forthright comments from an important critic 

All Joking Aside 

A most amusing page of Hollywood fact 

Hollywood Wardrobes 

Fay IVray shows you her wardrobe this month 

The MODERN SCREEN Magazine Reviews 

The perfect screen guide 

Beauty Advice 

This month — the Beauty Budget 

And also: The Sporting Thing To Do, 68; Ann Harding's New Home, 70; Scoops of 
the Month, 80; Marian Gives a Party, 85; They're Wearing Long Tresses, 86; 
They're Still Wearing Long Dresses, 88; Three Loves, 94; Venetian Romance, 96. 



8 
11 

Alex Gard 18 
George Gerhard 33 
Jack Welch 36 
76 
82 

Mary Biddle 104 



Ernest V. Heyn, Managing Editor 
K. Rowell Batten, Associate Editor Walter Ramsey, Western Representative 



Published monthly and copyrighted 1930 by Syndicate Publishing Company, Incorporated. Office of publication at Dunellen, New Jersey. Executive and editorial offices, 100 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. E. H. Meyer, President, A. Morel, Secretary and Treasurer. Vol. 1, Number 1, November, 1930. Printed in the U. S. A. Price in the United States 
S1.20 a year, 10c a copy. Price in Canada £1.80 a year, ISc a copy. Application for second class matter is pending at Dunellen, N. J. The publisher accepts no responsibility for the 
return of unsolicited manuscripts. 



4 



The Modern Screen Magazine 



The MODERN 
SCREEN AAagazine 

Forecast for next month: 
Thyra Samter Winslow 

whose amazingly human stories have 
graced the pages of most all the leading 
periodicals, including Liberty, the Satur- 
day Evening Post, Redbook, Cosmopolitan, 
etc., again is represented in the MODERN 
SCREEN Magazine with an article which 
strikes a fascinatingly reminiscent key — 
containing hitherto unpublished data 
about important screen personalities, past 
and present. 

Adele Whi'tely Fletcher 

that ever wide-awake interpreter of Holly- 
wood personalities and developments, fol- 
lows up her courageous letter to Clara Bow, 
which appears in this issue, with a most 
helpful and interesting feature, containing 
the hairdressing advice and suggestions of 
several of the important studio beauty and 
make-up experts. This is an article no 
woman of any age can afford to miss. 

Carroll and Garrett Graham 

exuberant and fearless authors of that 
riotous and scathing novel of Hollywood 
life, "Queer People," continue their career 
of shocking and fascinating film fans with 
a stimulating article called, "Queerer 
People," in which they expose and describe 
many of the amazing personalities who go 
to make up the Hollywood scene. 

Wynn 

whose readings of folks' destinies in the 
Zodiac during the past decade have amazed 
these same folks with the accuracy and 
almost gruesome actuality of his analyses 
and predictions, offers the readers of the 
MODERN SCREEN Magazine a startling 
astrological analysis of JANET GAYNOR. 

Walter Ramsey 

that writer of Hollywood doings and per- 
sonalities whose viewpoint is unequalled 
for enthusiasm, interest, and vitality; con- 
tinues his series, "The Unknown Holly- 
wood," which presents to the American 
public aspects of the film capital never 
before revealed, as well as his "Little Im- 
pressions of Big People," which, in this 
issue, offers that amazing story called 
"Garbo the Athlete." Walter Ramsey 
writes exclusively for the MODERN 
SCREEN Magazine. 

Besides: 

Chevalier's Paris Days 

in which Charleson Gray unearths some 
amazing facts about the Frenchman's pre- 
America experiences. 

Charlie Chaplin's Secret Sorrow 

in which Bob Moak reveals "The Little 
Mouse" and its startling importance in 
the great comedian's life. 

And many other completely entertaining 
and often invaluably instructive features 
and departments: the MODERN SCREEN 
Magazine Directory of Players and Pictures 
brought up to the minute, George Ger- 
hafd's continuation of his department, 
"Hollywood Highlights," another install- 
ment of "All Joking Aside," by Jack Welsh, 
continuations of the series "Hollywood 
Wardrobes" (Lilyan Tashman next month), 
"Scoops of the Month," reviews of current 
films, and Mary Biddle's most helpful 
"Beauty Advice." 

Space prohibits further description of the 
many other features, novelties, and picture 
pages which will make the next issue of the 
MODERN SCREEN Magazine one of the 
finest numbers of any film publication ever 
printed. Don't miss it. 

ON SALE AT ALL S. S. KRESCE 
AND S. H. KRESS STORES ABOUT 
NOVEMBER 15 





soys 



: ■ : \ 



"HE STAR OF 



Every Woman Should Know It! 

"DEAUTIFUL HAIR — with its becoming finger-wave — is all important in 
the ensemble of feminine loveliness. And now every woman, no 
matter how limited her time or her purse, can have glorious hair. It adds 
so much to her attractiveness and her personality." Here is the secret: 

There are four marvelous preparations, Jo-cur Beauty Aids for the hair, 
that should be on every woman's dressing table. Each of these famous 
preparations can be used quickly and easily at home. Each represents the 
very highest quality — regardless of price. And, each one can be ob- 
tained at most 5- and 10-cent stores. Larger sizes at your druggist. 

first — Jo-cur Hot Oil Treatment. This not only corrects Dandruff and 
other scalp disorders, but gives new life and elasticity to the hair itself. 
It actually makes the hair look and feel young. This is the same treatment 
recommended by leading beauty experts everywhere. 

then — Jo-cur Shampoo Concentrate. This is luxurious! !t leaves the scalp 
tingling with new life, and your hair soft, silky and easy to finger-wave. 

nexf — Jo-cur Waveset. Sets natural-looking waves quickly and is bene- 
ficial to hair and scalp. Its use is simplicity itself. More women use Jo- 
cur Waveset than any other waving liquid. 

finally — Jo-cur Brilliantine. Adds the finishing touch to a perfect coiffure 
— brings out the tiny lights that make your hair truly lovely. 

Stop in at the 5 and 10 or at your drug store today, and see how easy 
it is to keep your hair always beautiful with Jo-cur Beauty Aids. 



WINNERS in the Jo-cur Hair 
Beauty Contest will be an- 
nounced in the December issue 
of this and other magazines. 



St 



o-cur 

for the Hair 

CUR RAN LABORATORIES, Inc. 
485 East 1 33rd Street, New York, N. Y. 



5 



THE MODERN SCREEN 



MARRIED, AND IF SO, TO WHOM; BIRTHPLACE; WHERE 
(PLAYERS) TO WRITE THEM; STUDIO AFFILIATION; CURRENT AND 

FUTURE ROLES-BROUGHT UP TO DATE EACH MONTH 



ALVARADO, DON; married to a non- 
professional; born in Albuquerque, 
N. M. Write him at United Artists 
Studio. Free lance player. Fea- 
tured roles in "The Fall Guy," 
RKO and "For The Love O'Lil," 
Columbia. Now at work on "Light- 
nin'," Fox. 

AMES, ROBERT; married to Marion 
Oakes; born in Hartford, Conn. 
Write him at M-G-M 
Studio. Free lance 
player. "Marianne," 
"The Trespasser," 
United Artists, "Rich 
People," Pathe. Johnny 
Case in "Holiday," 
Pathe. 



ADOREE, RENEE, unmar- 
ried; born in Lille, 
France. Write her at 
M-G-M Studio. Free 
lance player. Featured 
roles in "Tide of Em- 
pire," and "The Singer 
of Seville," M-G-M. 
Now recovering after 
several months illness. 

ALBERTSON, FRANK; mar- 
ried to non-profession- 
al; born in Fergus Falls, 
Minn. Write him at Fox 
Studio. Contract play- 
er. Featured roles in 
"The Wild Party," and 
"So This is London." 
Fox. Now at work on 
"Just Imagine." 

ARLEN, RICHARD; mar- 
ried to Jobyna Ralston; 
born in Charlottesville, 
Va. Write him at Para- 
mount Studio. Con- 
tract star. Jim Cleve in 
"The Border Legion." 
Philip "Pink" Barker in 
God." Now at work as 
Payne in "Social Errors." 



ARTHUR, GEORGE K.; married to 
non-professional ; born in Aberdeen, 
Scotland. Write him at Darmour 
Studio. Contract player. Featured 
in series of two reel comedies for 
RKO release. 

ARTHUR, JEAN; unmarried; born in 
New York City. Write her at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract player. 
Lia Eltham in "The Return of 



Here are the stars' bi'rthda 


ys for the next few 


weeks. 


Why 


not drop 


them a line of 






congratulations ? 




Robert Armstrong 


Nov. 20 


Laura La Plante 


Nov. 1 


Jean Arthur 


Oct. 17 


Rod La Rocque 


Nov. 29 


Constance Bennett 


Oct. 10 


Charles Mack 


Oct. 13 


Sue Carol 


Oct. 30 


Marian Nixon 


Oct. 20 


Nancy Carroll 


Nov. 19 


Jack Oakie 


Nov. 12 


Reginald Denny 


Nov. 30 


Marie Prevost 


Nov. 6 


Karl Dane 


Oct. 12 


Will Rogers 


Nov. 4 


Janet Caynor 


Oct. 6 


Lewis Stone 


Nov. 15 


James Hall 


Oct. 20 


Lilyan Tashman 


Oct. 23 


Buster Keaton 


Oct. 4 


H. B. Warner 


Oct. 26 



' The Sea 
Lawrence 



Dr. Fu Manchu." 
for Mary Ryan in 



Loaned to RKO 
'Danger Lights." 



ARLISS, GEORGE; married to Florence 
Moncgomery; born in London, 
Eng. Write him at Warner Broth- 
ers Studio. Contract star. The 
Raja in "The Green Goddess." 
Title role in "Disraeli." Heythorp 
in "Old English." 

ARM IDA: unmarried; born in Sonora, 
Mexico. Write her at Warner 
Brothers Studio. Free lance player. 
Lead opposite John Barrymore in 
"General Crack." Featured role 
in "Under a Texas Moon." Now 
on vaudeville tour. 

ARMSTRONG, ROBERT; married to 
Jeanne Kent; born in Saginaw, 
Mich. Write him at Pathe Studio. 
Contract star. Keene in "The 
Racketeer." Dude in "Oh Yeah?" 
Loaned to RKO for Larry Doyle in 
"Danger Lights." 

6 



ASTOR, MARY; widow; born in Quincy, 
111. Write her at First National 
Studio. Free lance player. Julia 
Seaton in "Holiday." Richard 
Barthelmess' sweetheart in 
"Adios." 

AUSTIN, WILLIAM; married to non- 
professional; born in Georgetown, 
British Guiana. Write him at 
Paramount Studio. Contract 
player. Basil Piston in "Let's 
Go Native." Sylvester Wadsworth 
in "The Return of Dr. Fu Manchu." 
Now working as Lord Eustace Far- 
rington in "Along Came Youth." 

AYRES, LEWIS; unmarried; born in 
Minneapolis Minn. Write him at 
Universal Studio. Contract player. 
Young lover in "The Kiss," M-G- 
M. Leading role in "All Quiet 
on the Western Front." Lead in 
"Common Clay," Universal. The 



Gangster in "Handful of Clouds," 
Warner Brothers. Now playing 
Billy Benson in "East is West," 
Universal. 

BAKEWELL, WILLIAM; unmarried; 
born in Hollywood, Cal. Write 
him at Universal Studio. Free 
lance player. Jimmy in "On With 
the Show," Warner Brothers. Juve- 
nile lead in "The Gold Diggers," 
Warner Brothers. Fea- 
tured role in "All Quiet 
on the Western Front," 
Universal. Now working 
in ' 'Dark Star, ' ' M-G-M. 

BARTHELMESS, RICH- 
ARD; married to the 
former Mrs. Jessica 
Haynes Sergeant; born 
in New York City. Write 
him at First National 
Studio. Contract star. 
Dick Courtney in "Dawn 
Patrol." Now at work 
in "Adios." 

BARRYMORE, JOHN; mar- 
ried to Dolores Costello. 
Born in Philadelphia, 
Pa. Write him at War- 
ner Brothers Studio. 
Contract star. Title role 
in "General Crack." 
Lord Strathpeffer in 
"The Man From Blank- 
ley's." Capt. Ahab in 
"Moby Dick." 

BARRYMORE, LIONEL; 
married to Irene Fen- 
wick; born in Philadel- 
phia, Pa. Write him at 
M-G-M Studio. Con- 
tract player and direc- 
tor. Featured roles in 
"Mysterious Island," 
"West of Zanzibar," for 
M-G-M and "Stark Mad," for 
Warner Brothers. Now devoting his 
energies to directing. 

BANCROFT, GEORGE; married to 
Octavia Boroshe; born in Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Write him at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract star. 
Blake Greeson in "The Mighty." 
Joe Forziati in "Ladies Love 
Brutes." Featured in "Paramount 
on Parade." Now working as Bill 
Rafferty in "Typhoon Bill." 

BAXTER, WARNER; married to Wini- | 
fred Bryson; born in Columbus, 
Ohio. Write him at Fox Studio. 
Contract star. The Cisco Kid in 
"In Old Arizona." Title role in 
"The Cisco Kid." About to start 
work in stellar role in "The Modern 
World." 

BEERY, NOAH; separated from Mar- 
guerite Lindsay; born in Kansas 
City, Mo. Write him at First 
National Studio. Contract player. 



The Modern Screen Magazine 



DIRECTORY 



Bolshevik leader 
the Flame." 



in "The Song of 



BEERY, WALLACE; separated from 
Mary Gilman; born in Kansas 
City, Mo. Write him at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract player. Butch, 
in "The Big House." Now at work 
in "Dark Star." 

BELL, REX; unmarried; born in 
Chicago, 111. Write him at Fox 
Studio. Contract player. Featured 
roles in "Taking a Chance," and 
"They Had to See Paris." 

BENNETT, CONSTANCE; divorced; 
born in New York City. Write her 
at Pathe Studio. Contract .star. 
Loaned to Warner Brothers as 
international spy in "Three Faces 
East." Co-starred in "Common 
Clay" for Fox. Next Pathe starring 
vehicle now being written. 

BENNETT, JOAN; divorced; born in 
New York City. Write her at 
United Artists Studio. Contract 
player. Feminine lead opposite 
John Barrymore in "Moby Dick," 
Warner Brothers. Now starring in 
"Smilin' Thru," United Artists. 

BICKFORD, CHARLES; married to 
non-professional; born in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. Write him at M-G- 
M Studio. Contract player. The 
miner in "Dynamite," Matt in 
"Anna Christie." Now at work 
on "The Passion Flower." 

BLACKMER, SYDNEY; married to 
Lenore Ulric; born in Salisbury, 
N. C. Write him at First National 
Studio. Contract player. Geoffrey 
Brand in "Woman Hungry." Mor- 
gan Pell in "The Bad Man." 
Now working in "Kismet." 

BOLES, JOHN; married to Marcellite 
Dobbs; born in Greenville, Texas. 
Write him at Universal Studio. 
Contract star. Featured in "The 
King of Jazz." Now playing male 
lead in "Lilli," United Artists. 

BORDEN, OLIVE; unmarried; born in 
Richmond, Va. Write her at RKO 
Studio. Free lance player. Gloria 
Staunton in "The Social Lion," 
Paramount. Eve Quinn i n "Wed- 
ding Rings." Now in New York. 



BOW, CLARA; unmarried; born in 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Write her at 
Paramount Studio. Contract star. 
Ruby Nolan in "True to the Navy." 
Pepper in "Love Among the Mil- 
lionaires." Now working as Norma 
Martin in "Her Wedding Night." 

BOYD, WILLIAM; divorced; born in 
Cambridge, Ohio. Write him at 
Pathe Studio. Contract player. 
Bill O'Brien in "Officer O'Brien." 
Now working as Bill Thatcher in 
"Beyond Victory." 

BRENDEL, EL; married to Flo Burt; 
born in Philadelphia, Pa. Write 
him at Fox Studio. Contract 
player. Olesen in "The Cockeyed 
World." Featured roles in "The 
Big Trail" and "Svenson's Wild 
Party." Now at work on "Just 
Imagine." 

BRENT, EVELYN; married to Harry 
Edwards; born in Tampa, Florida. 
Write her at RKO Studio. Contract 
player. Feminine lead in "Framed." 
Now playing in "The Silver Horde." 

BRIAN, MARY; unmarried; born in 
Corsicana, Texas. Write her at 
Paramount Studio. Contract 
player. Ruth Hammond in "The 
Light of Western Stars." Cynthia 
Brown in "The Social Lion." Now 
playing Barbara Tanner in "Social 
Errors." 

BROWN, JOE E.; married to Kathryn 
Frances McGrau; born in Holgate, 
Ohio. Write him at First National 
Studio. Contract player. Elmer 
Peters in "Top Speed." Rollo 
Smith in "Going Wild." Now at 
work on "Sit Tight." 

BROWN, JOHNNY MACK; married; 
born in Dothan, Alabama. Write 
him at M-G-M Studio. Contract 
player. Title role in "Billy The 
Kid." Now at work on "The 
Great Meadow" and "Great Day." 

CAROL, SUE; married to Nick Stuart; 
born in Chicago, 111. Write her 
at RKO Studio. Contract player. 
Molly O'Neal in "Dancing 
Sweeties." Marie Thurston in"She's 
My Weakness." Marybelle Cobb in 
"The Golden Calf." Now playing 
(Continued on page 120) 



COA\PLETE STUDIO ADDRESSES 

Columbia Studios, 1438 Cower Street, Hollywood, California 
First National Studios, Burbank, California. 

Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Avenue, Hollywood, California. 

Samuel Coldwyn, 7210 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood, California. 

Metro-Coldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, California. 

Paramount-Famous-Lasky Studios, Hollywood, California. 

Pathe Studios, Culver City, California. 

RKO Studios, 780 Cower Street, Hollywood, California. 

Warner Brothers Studio, 5842 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, California. 

United Artists Studios, 104! No. Formosa Avenue, Hollywood, California 

Universal Studios, Universal City, California. 



2) o men admire 
natural color ? 

JUST % *• 14 ONE ! 




Like Nature's Own Glow 

Men admire youthful, healthy color. Certainly! 
They want your lips to look Natural . . . not a 
greasy smear of glaring, flashy color! 

Tangee is entirely unlike any other lipstick. 
It contains no pigment. Magically it takes on 
color after you apply it to your lips. It is like 
a glow from within ... a blush so natural that 
it seems a part of the lips. And Tangee never 
rubs off or looks artificial. 

Based on a marvelous color principle.Tangee 
blends perfectly with your own naturalcoloring, 
no matter what your individual complexion! 

Tangee Lipstick, $1. The same marvelous color 
principle in Rouge Compact, 75£ . . . Crime 
Rouge, $1. Face Powder, blended to match the 
natural skin tones, $1. Night Cream, both 
cleanses and nourishes, $1. Day Cream, protects 
the skin, $1. Cosmetic, a new "mascara," will 
not smart, $1. 




SEND 20c FOR TANGEE BEAUTY SET 

(Six items in miniature and "The Art of Make-Up") 
The George W. Luft Co., Dept. K-ll 
417 Fifth Avenue 



New York 



Name . . 
Address . 



7 



THE MODERN SCREEN 




Dick Barthelmess and 
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., 
in a thrilling moment 
from "The Dawn Pa- 
trol." This ranks as 
one of the best air pic- 
tures ever to come out 
of good old Hollywood. 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN (United Artists)— 
Reviewed in this issue. 

ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT 
(Universal) — The late war depicted 
in an amazing style. Don't fail to 
see it. Although — if you have a 
weak stomach — you may have to 
close your eyes in some sequences. 

ANIMAL CRACKERS (Paramount)— 
The Marx Brothers again put over a 
corking comedy. You'll love it. 

ANYBODY'S WAR (Paramount)— The 
Two Black Crows get mixed up in the 
A. E. F. and a lot of good comedy. 
Better go and see it. 

ANYBODY'S WOMAN (Paramount- 
Ruth Chatterton and Clive Brook 
in a story about a chorus girl who 
wanted to be a lady. The Chatter- 
ton plays a new type of role unus- 
ually well. 

THE BAD MAN (First National)— Re- 
viewed in this issue. 

THE BIG HOUSE (M-G-M) — A cork- 
ing story of life behind bars. Noth- 
ing to do with a speakeasy. Of 
course, there's a jail-break with 
tanks and what all, but it's good. 
Wallace Beery as Butch is great. 

THE BIG POND) Paramount)— M eestair 
Chevalier is at it again, this time as 
a Frenchman who comes to America 
and marries the boss's daughter. 
The story is not terribly hot, but 
Chevalier is at his best, as usual. 



THE BRIDE OF THE REGIMENT (First 
National) — This has everything in 
it but still does not quite come up 
to being a great picture. Louise 
Fazenda, Ford Sterling and Lupino 
Lane give plenty of good comedy 
and the Technicolor is wonderful. 

CAUGHT SHORT (M-G-M) — Marie 
Dressier and Polly Moran co-star in 
this number and do so with terrific 
success. Strongly advise you to 
see it. 

COMMON CLAY (Fox)— Reviewed in 
this issue. 

COURAGE (Warner Brothers)— Belle 
Bennett in another mother role, but 
far better than the one she's been 
getting lately. This is worth a visit. 

DANCING SWEETIES (Warner Broth- 
ers) — Grant Withers and Sue Carol 
in a dance hall story. See it if you 
like that sort of thing. 

THE DAWN PATROL (First National)— 
A really thrilling air story with 
Richard Barthelmess, Douglas Fair- 
banks, Jr., and Neil Hamilton all 
contributing excellent characteriza- 
tions. The air scenes are as good as 
any that have been seen so far. 

THE DIVORCEE (M-G-M)— The story 
which was based "unofficially" on 
the famous book, "Ex-Wife," with 
Norma Shearer in the leading role. 
Miss Shearer gives the best perform- 
ance of her career. 



DIXIANA (RKO) — Reviewed in this 
issue. 

DOUGHBOYS (M-G-M) — Reviewed in 
this issue. 

DUMBELLS IN ERMINE (Warner 
Brothers)— James Gleason and Rob- 
ert Armstrong in a slangy comedy. 
You'll like it. 

EYES OF THE WORLD (United Artists) 
— This is a typical Harold Bell 
Wright story in which the author 
does Wright by Our Nell. 

THE FLORODORA GIRL (M-G-M)— 
Marion Davies comics through this 
one as a daughter of the Gay Nine- 
ties and, believe us, they were very, 
very gay. Do not fail to see it. 

FOR THE DEFENSE (Paramount)— 
Kay Francis and William Powell do 
splendid work in this story of a law- 
yer, the woman he loved, and their 
troubles. The dialogue is excellent 
and the performances of these two 
are so good that you must see it. 

FREE AND EASY (M-G-M) — The first 
talkie of our friend, Mr. Keaton, 
which moves through the movie lots 
of Hollywood. Pretty good enter- 
tainment. 

THE GOLDEN DAWN (Warner Brothers) \ 
— A spectacle based on the famous ■ 
operetta of the same name, done in 
the famous Hollywood lavish man- 
ner. Vivienne Segal is splendid. 



A few terse pointers on the current pictures you ought to see 



* 



DIRECTORY (PICTURES) 



Joan Crawford in one 
of the department store 
scenes from "Our 
Blushing Brides." She 
plays a clothes model 
with, of course, an ad- 
mirer or two. This 
picture has everything 
in it to make it a success. 




GOOD INTENTIONS (Fox)— Edmund 
Lowe in a gangster story again. 
This time he falls in love with a so- 
ciety girl and tries to give up his 
gangster operations. You'll like it. 

GRUMPY (Paramount)— This is an 
English story, played by English 
actors in an English manner. If this 
doesn't deter you, you'll have a good 
time. 

HELL'S ANGELS (Caddo Company)— 
Reviewed in this issue. 

HELL'S ISLAND (Columbia)— A yarn 
about the Foreign Legion with Jack 
Holt and Ralph Graves pulling the 
buddy stuff to great advantage. 

HOLD EVERYTHING (Warner Brothers) 
— Joe E. Brown and Winnie Lightner 
in a story with many funny gags, 
based on prize fighting. These two 
comedians put this over in great 
shape. 

HOLIDAY (Pathe)— This is good stuff, 
although a little slow in spots. Ed- 
ward Everett Horton pulls some 
very, very funny comedy. 

JOURNEY'S END (Tiffany)— A fasci- 
nating psychological study of what 
happens when men go to war. It's 
a little slow at times but, neverthe- 
less, it will hold your interest to the 
6nale — which is one of the most 
artistic we have ever seen. 

JUNO AND THE PAYCOCK (Harold 
Auten) — Here's an Irish play in talkie 



form which was made in England. 
It's hardly suitable for an American 
audience and we do not advise you 
to see it unless you have a decidedly 
cosmopolitan outlook on things. 

LADIES MUST PLAY (Columbia)— A 
kidding story of a broker and his 
stenographer. He takes her to New- 
port for the purpose of finding her a 
rich husband, for which he will re- 
ceive a commission. Naturally, 
complications ensue. Good. 

LET US BE GAY (M-G-M) — This has 
everything in it, including Marie 
Dressier, Norma Shearer, Raymond 
Hackett, Hedda Hopper, a good 
story and wonderful clothes. Yet, 
somehow, it's not quite as good as 
it could have been. However, you 
should see it. 

LET'S GO NATIVE (Paramount)— Re- 
viewed in this issue. 

LIEBE IM RING (All Art)— None other 
than Max Schmelling, the heavy- 
weight champion, playing in a Ger- 
man talkie. And, what's more, he 
does very well. Fine for those who 
understand German. 

LITTLE ACCIDENT (Universal)— This 
is a pretty funny comedy about a 
man who, upon the eve of his mar- 
riage, finds himself mixed up with 
his child from a former annulled 
marriage. Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., 
and Anita Page shine. 

LOVE AMONG THE MILLIONAIRES 
(Paramount) — This story is pretty 



silly but Clara Bow and Stanley 
Smith act the romantic lovers in 
charming style. Mitzi Green, Skeet 
Gallagher and Stuart Erwin put in 
some swell comedy and make the 
picture well worth seeing. 

MAMBA (Tiffany)— A story of South 
Africa and what it does to people 
who live there. Eleanor Boardman 
and Jean Hersholt give corking 
characterizations. 

A MAN FROM WYOMING (Paramount) 
— This is Gary Cooper's latest, but 
not his best. The story is decidedly 
silly but, nevertheless, his personal- 
ity makes it a thing worth seeing. 
So, you'd better see it. 

MANSLAUGHTER (Paramount) — 
Claudette Colbert and Fredric 
March in the talkie version of the 
famous silent film. Good entertain- 
ment. 

THE MATRIMONIAL BED (Warner 
Brothers) — An amusing story which 
takes place in Paris, with Frank Fay 
and Lilyan Tashman playing the 
leading roles in frothy style. 

MOBY DICK (Warner Brothers)— Pre- 
viewed in this issue. 

MONTE CARLO (Paramount)— Re- 
viewed in this issue. 

OLD ENGLISH (Warner Brothers)— Re- 
viewed in this issue. 

(Continued on page 121) 



On page 82 you will find reviews of the new pictures 

9 



We just had time to get this into print. It shows 
exactly what the interior of the Fresh Air Taxicab 
Company Incorpolated looks like in the RKO produc- 
tion, "Check and Double Check," which — three 
guesses— features • no one but Amos and Andy in 
person— not just a radio voice. 

10 



SCREEN MAGAZINE 



FILM GOSSIP OF THE MONTH 



T 



HE heir to the M-G-M lion and other Culver City 
knicknacks made his celebrated arrival on the morn- 
ing of August 24 and great was the rejoicing. In 
other words a son was born to Irving Thalberg and 
Norma Shearer. The Metro lot resembled nothing short of 
holiday festivity and 'tis said that Irving even passed out 
cigars to actors whose contracts he had forgotten to renew. 

He is the first baby in 
some time to crash the 
front pages of the local 
newspapers. 

In spite of the emi- 
nence of his arrival no 
name had definitely been 
decided upon and two 
days after his birth borh 
the happy mother and 
proud father were still re- 
ferring to the new addi- 
tion as merely "he." His 
illustrious mother was 
holding out for Irving 
Thalberg, Jr., but his 
father merely replied : 
"Let's give him a name of 
his own — a real identity." 



EVER since Frances Dee clicked as a leading lady on 
the Paramount lot after about six months of extra 
work, Jack Oakie has been giving the young lady quite a 
social rush. Jack isn't making any great secret of the 
fact that he thinks Frances is an awfully nice sort of 
person. Frances seems to like Jack, too. But who 
doesn't? Everybody falls for that famous grin. 



BE B E DANIELS, 
Ben Lyon and Mrs. 
Lyon, mater, are making 
a conspicuous threesome 
at most of the social af- 
fairs of the colony. ■ 
Wherever Bebe and Ben 
go Mrs. Lyon is pretty 
sure to be somewhere in 
the shadow of the honey- 
moon couple. Ben's de- 
votion to his mother is 
most admirable, even 
though three has always 
been considered something 
of a crowd. 

Hollywood is strong for 
mother-in-law, anyway. 
Even the most cynical 

can't remember her having broken up a single Hollywood 
marriage. 

Joseph Schenck once said his best friend in the world 
was "Peg" Talmadge, mother of Norma, and chief adviser 
to the Talmadge family. 

Norma Shearer has lived under the same roof with her 
in-laws the entire time of her married life to Irving 
Thalberg. 



LAST MINUTE NEWS 

The John Barrymores' little daughter will be 
named Dolores Ethel Mae. 

The Thalberg baby will be named Irving, Jr. 

All M-G-M workers throughout the world ceased 
work for five minutes when the salute was fired at 
Lon Chaney's funeral. 

Work on 'The Dove" had to be stopped on 
account of the serious illness of Dolores Del Rio. 
She is reported to be better now. 



Dorothy Sebastian and William Boyd are to be 
married in the near future. 

Dorothy Mackaill has accepted a new contract 
by cable from England. 

Howard Hughes is rumored to have made an 
offer for the Universal Studio. If the deal goes through, 
Carl Laemmle, Jr., stays on a five year contract. 



RICHARD DIX es- 
corted Mary Lawlor 
to the opening of a new 
picture, and to a supper 
club, and started a lot of 
eyebrow elevation as to 
what Phillips Holmes was 
doing that night. Mary 
and Phil had been going 
together right smartly. 

The old timers had 
rather begun to hope that 
Dix might some day get 
through a picture without 
a rumored romance with 
his leading lady. "Of 
course," says Mary Law- 
lor, "we're just good 
friends." The same old 
story. And Hollywood 
nods its head. The same 
old nod. 



Mervyn Le Roy, the 
director, and his pretty, 
blonde wife, Edna Mur- 
phy, are reported to be o li- 
the verge of a divorce. 

if: 4* H» 

WHILE the Marquis 
de la Falaise was de- 
voting most of his Holly- 
wood visit to Constance 
Bennett, his younger 
brother was escorting his 
sister-in-law-but-not- for- 
long, Gloria Swanson, to various places of local attraction. 
Evidently Gloria and Hank haven't allowed their separa- 
tion to interfere with their sense of humor. 



Maureen 0' Sullivan, that cute little Irish trick over at 
Fox, is stepping places with John Farrow, zvho might 
very well be called A Young Man About Tozvn. 



Olive Borden may go on the stage in New York. 



Edzvin Carewe is directing Lupe Velcs in "Resurrection" 
the picture in which he made her Mexican rival, Dolores 
Del Rio, famous. Wonder if the tempestuous Lupe will 
outshine Dolores. What do you think? 



THE first wedding anniversary of Marian Nixon and 
Eddie Hillman was a brilliant dinner-dance affair, not 
only in the guest list but in the sumptuous glitter of two 
beautiful gifts of jewelry — both from Eddie to Marian. 



We frankly think that this is the best news section of its kind 



ii 




Milton Sills, Al Santell, director, 
and Jane Keith talk over location 
possibilities in the cabin of the 
prop boat being used in "The 
Sea Wolf." Sills is making his 
come-back in this. 



Barbara Stanwyck has 
made a tremendous hit 
in the talkies and already 
has a large fan follow- 
ing. She was with 
Columbia for a while 
but her latest is a War- 
ner release, called, 
"Illicit." 



The bracelet which holds all records for bracelets, so 
far, is a band of solid diamonds about three inches wide, 
set with six pigeon-blood rubies. The necklace is a link 
of diamonds with a diamond "knot" drop. 

Marian's gift to Eddie was a cream-colored Packard- 
phaeton, a neat little job running into about $8000 at your 
nearest dealer's. 

Among those who enjoyed the hospitality of Marian 
and Eddie were: Mr. and Mrs. Millard Webb (Mary 
Eaton), the latter wearing a pale blue dinner gown 
trimmed in rhinestones ; Nick Stuart and Sue Carol — Sue 
also in blue with a big blue bow and a diamond necklace ; 
Mr. and Mrs. Hoot Gibson (Sally Eilers), the lady wear- 
ing something wispy and effective in midnight blue ; 
Louise Brooks — in coral chiffon ; Carmen Pantages — in 
black ; Jean Harlow in one of her famous decollette 
models — and who am I to remember what the lady had on ? 

* * * 

Sue Carol is the best little "advice taker" 
in Hollywood. Sue never makes an important 
move without first consulting her lawyer, her 
mother, her husband, the cook, the maid, the 
chauffeur and her press agent. And her 
chauffeur's advice will often carry as much 
weight as her high-powered lawyer's. 

' ^ 

JOHN BOLES is temperamental about his voice. The 
evenings before the-days he is to sing into the "mike," 
John retires about nine-thirty p. m., eats practically 
nothing for dinner, particularly nothing sweet ; and takes 
a long, brisk walk before going to the studio. 

One afternoon we dropped in on John at his home. He 
was listening to the new batch of Victrola records of his 
voice which had been sent up as samples. 

He carefully, and without any show of temper, broke 
two of them. "Just to make sure," he explained, "that 
they aren't released." 

* * * 

A "SEPARATION PARTY" is the latest thing in 
Hollywood ! 

It was Eddie Sutherland and his very pretty young 
wife who chose to show us a brand new idea for a 'party.' 
Ethel Kenyon, Eddie's wife, who deserted Broadway a 
few months ago, stood with her husband at the entrance 




12 




James Cleason and a friend 
prepare to conduct an unusual 
sort of a race while Russell Clea- 
son, the younger generation of 
the Gleason family, sees to it 
that they toe the mark. 



This fascinating Egyp- 
tian dancer is none 
other than Lillian Roth 
whom you've been 
seeing in those Para- 
mount films so much 
lately. Her latest is in 
Jack Oakie's new num- 
ber, "Sea Legs." 





to the Embassy last Friday evening and welcomed the 
guests as though everything in the world was just about 
right. 

Imagine everyone's surprise, then, when Ethel con- 
fided to some of her friends that she and Eddie (who is 
one of our handsomest directors) had decided to try a 
matrimonial vacation. 

Hollywood, in the past, has given to a waiting world 
the "Wake for the lost husband" party . . . which is just 
another name for the time when all the lady's friends 
gather at some appointed spot and drink (many) toasts 
to her newly-found freedom. But this idea of the hus- 
band and wife joining hands and throwing a little shin- 
dig so that they might announce the separation is a wee 
bit different. 

sjs ^ 

ANNA Q. NILSSON made her first public appearance 
. at the Jimmie Gleasons wedding anniversary party. 
She looked remarkably well and lovelier than ever after 
her long fight for health. She confided that she expected 
to spend Christmas in Sweden and not until her return 
will she attempt the talkies. 

^ ^ ^ 

Did you know that every time you hold out your hand 
to make a right turn — or left — or even stop, that you are 
following up a gag? It's true! The traffic signals nozv 
in use all over the United States are the results of a 
clever young press agent's dream. Jimmie Fidler, at tliat 
time press agent for Wally Reid, thought up the signals 
as a publicity gag to help W ally's racing pictures. And 
how it helped I 

* # * 

NOW the Federal boys are going to close all 
the night clubs around Hollywood because 
they serve ginger ale, ice and glasses "openly and 
notoriously." I suppose everyone in town will 
have to carry an affidavit that he or she really en- 
joys ginger ale straight. What a laugh. 

s|e s|c % 

AFTER being rather "cold" for a couple of years, the 
. famous Cocoanut Grove has come back in the in- 
terest of the movie people and Tuesday nights there are 
as star-studded as ever. Just recently there were present : 



13 




Dual roles are not seen as much as they 
used to be. But Charles Bickford plays one 
in "River's End," the epic of the Northwest 
which he is making on the Warner lot. 



Dolores Del Rio and 
her husband, Cedric Gib- 
bons. Dolores created 
much admiration in an 
ivory-satin evening gown 
trimmed in rhinestones. 
With this she wore one of 
the new evening wraps— long and abund- 
antly furred. 

Bebe Daniels, Ben Lyon, Mrs. Lyon, 
Mae Sunday and Doctor and Mrs. Harry 
Martin in one party. Bebe wore pink lace. 

June Collyer at a "two-some" table 
with an unidentified young man. June's 
cafe gown was of wispy black lace with 
a small dinner-hat of the same material. 

Maureen O' Sullivan and John Farrow 
brown satin with ornaments of amber-costume jewelry. 

Betty Compson, Hugh Trevor, Richard Dix and Mary 
Lawlor made up another group. Both of the ladies wore 
white with orchid corsages. 

Ivan Lebedeff and Thelma Todd. These two looked as 
though they might have been attending an Embassy ball — - 
Ivan in formal swallow tails and Thelma in her white 
gown that trailed the floor and her long white gloves. 

Lowell Sherman and Helene Costello dined alone, un- 
less you want to count Lowell's monocle. 



Non< they're calling Ruth Chatterton "The first lady of 
the screen." Do they HAVE to title them? 



GENEVIEVE TOBIN turned down an offer to re- 
turn to the stage in "Fifty Million Frenchmen," in 
favor of a Universal Picture contract that ranks her with 
John Boles as the highest salaried star on that lot. 



SEEN AT THE FIGHTS: Zelma O'Neal who has 
blondined her hair and now looks quite preferred, 
with her handsome husband, Tony Bushell. 



Ray Hallor sitting in the ringside with none other than 
our own Molly O'Day. 

John Boles, Alan Hale, Walter Heirs, Ernst Lubitsch 
and Billy Wellman crowded around the ring yelling in- 
structions to a fallen Mex. 

Al Jolson and Ruby Keeler standing up and waving 
across the ring to Barbara Stanwyck and Frank Fay. 
Frank came way up out of his collar to say "Howdy." 

Joe E. Brown giving Harry Green a grand (canyon) 
grin. 

Lupe and Gary both wearing dark glasses so that the 
common dubbers won't know what they missed. 



TT^EJV people know that Greta Garbo has a brother, but 
it's true. He is also in pictures but not in this country 
and lie is younger than Greta and bears the good old 
Szvedish name of Szven. 

Swen is appearing in Paramount's first all-Szvcdish. 
talking picture, "Where Roses Bloom," which is in pro- 
duction in the company's studios in Paris. 



Lina Basquette, who has been the victim of much sen- 
sational publicity with regard to an at- 
tempted suicide and divorce, has paved 
her own way with gold in case Holly- 
wood studios do not see fit to cast her 
in forthcoming productions. 

Lina has "backed" an actor's 
agency that numbers among its clien- 
tele some of the busiest 



Here we have Eddie Quillan in the act of 
doing a good turn for a pal at the Culver 
City airport. Just a new way of seeing your 
friends off— off the ground, as it were. 

-Maureen in 



and most celebrated 
players in Hollywood. 
Her business venture, 
however, is very sub rasa 
— not a single player 
knows what agency she 
is with. Quite a num- 
ber of times lately, Lina 




S. M. Eisenstein, Paramount's 

14 



newest importation, amazes Hollywood 



has been up for parts in competition with some of her 
"own clients" and the fact that she failed to get the parts 
didn't make her a bit mad. "Whoever works ... I get 
a check," is the way Lina takes the thing. 



DOUG, JR'S mother is on the set almost 
every day that her son is working these 
days. After each scene is completed, Dong 
rushes to his mother's side and asks her 
how she liked it. Sometimes she nods her 
head in partial approval, but more often 
Doug receives a huge kiss of "absolute okay." 
Mother and son as sweethearts are few and 
far between in Hollywood. 







UITE a bit of hue and cry lately about the Billie 
Dove-Howard Hughes romance. One faction is 
almost positve that the thing is just about on the rocks 
. . . but another (and just as positive) group is spreading 
the good word that Billie and Howard are to be married 
in Europe. 

Having heard all about the costly fur coats and other 
nick-nacks that Hughes has been rumored to have given 
the lady of his heart, it is very easy to believe that they 
will get married as soon as the divorce 
courts allow them — but Hollywood ro- 
mances have a way of doing things at 
odd moments that one' hasn't figured on. 
Maybe we had all best dope this one out 
for ourselves. 




Winnie Lightner and Joe E. Brown have 
some fun at the expense of a friend of theirs 
who might be described as a dummy. They 
were making "Sit Tight," when this was taken. 



America I swore to uphold 
the constitution," said Eiscn- 
stein bravely. 

This is on the square. 
We'll vouch for it! 



n. M. EISEN STEIN , 
kj the new Russian di- 
rector with Paramount, 
shocked the host at a re- 
cent Hollywood party by 
actually refusing a cock- 
tail. 

"When I came into 



The younger brother of Hollywood. 
William Janney has played more young 
brother roles than anyone in the movies. 
His latest was "Shooting Straight," with 
Richard Dix. His next is, "Crime." 




EORGE OLSEN'S night club is one 
of the "must" places on every star's 
weekly program of late. Dick Barthel- 
mess, Marion Davies, Chaplin and many 
others who are seldom seen in the regular 
watering places may be found at Olsen's. 
Which reminds us of a little story we 
heard about George : It seems he led his 
orchestra through some swell numbers in 
"Movietone Follies of 1930" and when they were shown 
in Denmark the crowd went wild at the thought of one 
of their own boys making good in the big city. George 
just smiles— and plays. 

* * * 

Douglas Fairbanks is reported to be receiving $8,000 
per day for his services in "Reaching For The Moon." 
And the more you think of that salary the more appro- 
priate the title of the picture seems. 



THEY are beginning to talk about re-filming 
"The Sheik," with Chester Morris in the 
role that made Valentino immortal. There was 
also talk not so long ago, that John Boles might 
play a musical version of that story. How- 
ever, if they do make it, the part will probably 
go to Chester. United Artists own the story. 

^ H 5 ^ 

Now the mystery of how ZaSu Pitts got that first name 
is all cleared up : 

Two aunts are responsible. One was named Eliza 
and the other Susan. In order to please both ladies 
ZaSu's mother took the last of one name and the first 
of the other and putting them together they spelled 
"ZaSu," just like that. (Continued on page 118) 



Just what is this about June Collyer, Gary Cooper and Lupe Velez 



15 



ILLUSTRATED 
BY 

RUSSELL PATTERSON 



The girls then became 
rather dashing, with fear- 
fully short dresses, irre- 
sponsible manners and 
behavior, and in every way 
expressed flaming youth. 




THE NEW 



I WROTE an- aphorism once which said : 
"The virtue of the women of a nation depends upon 
the exigencies of its men." 

I might have added: "And the fashions in the type 
of woman also" — for the same reason ! Because, after 
all, what the men of a nation at any given time prefer is 
what the women strive to express ! 

After the war, all males were too tired and weary to 
stand any type which required them to think before they 
spoke. They wanted just baby-faced, golden-haired, child- 
like dolls, with big heads, curly, long bobs, or long curls 
of hair, like Mary Pickford. They seem plump to our 
eyes now. Every him after 1918 showed this type for 
a while. 

Then, as the fearful strain of reopening the business 
world fatigued brain and muscle, males wanted perfectly 
straight, boyish "cuties" with shingled heads, or Eton 
crops, and no female attributes of roundness, or any sug- 
gestion of sex. The outline of the girl form was com- 
pressed into the look of the boy form. All the films 
showed this. 



B 



UT, when the males grew less tired and prosperity 
again permeated business, they wanted very young 



but go-ahead companions who were called "Flappers." 
These stimulated their renewed sense of life. They did 
not have to think, they could romp and joy-ride with them, 
and express their sprouting exuberance after war 
exhaustion. 

The girls then became rather dashing, budding ado- 
lescents or precocious children in outline, with fearfully 
short dresses, all sorts of shingles and bobs, irresponsi- 
ble manners and behavior, and in every way expressed 
blatant, flaming youth. Even those up to thirty years of 
age did not dare to suggest anything else, or no man both- 
ered with them ! They all had to conceal intelligence, and 
every studio turned out pictures by the dozen showing 
tipsy orgies of flappers and their friends. 

Then came Clara Bow in my "IT" story, and, by that 
time, males had begun to weary a little of the flapper, 
because business seemed solid, and they had more time 
in which to think. The "ITS" and would-be "ITS," and 
self-styled "ITS" flooded the market in the film world. 
They intrigued the males and stimulated their imagina- 
tions. Thus the girls began to wear more subtle clothes, 
and to show the female outline once more, though the 
skirts were still very short. Lovely faces, tempting looks 
and alluring but slender rotundities were what men re- 



THIS FAMOUS AUTHOR TELLS WITH SHREWD PERCEPTION 

16 




By ELINOR GLYN 



The girls now began to 
wear longer and longer 
dresses, let their hair grow 
and took on all the demure 
womanliness of old-time 
Southern belles. 



quired, and the faithful film, incredibly truthful chron- 
icler of public taste, showed this type on a thousand 
screens. 

Suddenly, the talkies sprang into being ! It was all too 
sudden, though, and chaos reigned. The males, by this 
time, desired something hectic, because a frenzied gam- 
bling in the business world held most of their interests. 

Talkies were a new excitement — and, with that un- 
canny astuteness which is almost second-sight, producers 
knew that, to get by with indifferent recording and un- 
trained voices, the silver sheet must either be flooded with 
females expressing sex appeal and nothing else — or show 
crime and its perpetrators in the dens where it is born. 
Hence, we saw rows and rows of chorus girls' legs moving 
in a mad rhythm, with songs interpolated quite irrele- 
vantly, just as the quite irrelevant fluctuations of the 
stock market took place. Heroines were all of the low- 
est class who bounced overnight from the gutter into 
perfect ladyhood, just as the fortunes of the males as- 
cended from the Boweries of America into the aristocracy 
of the millionaires. That "IT" suited the spirit of the 
time. And all the first talkies represent exactly this spirit 
of the month or two before the crash. But when misfor- 
tune came, how did it effect the attitude of the men? 



WHEN disaster, or, at best, a slump, fell upon the 
males, those surviving yearned for sympathetic 
darlings with the mother instinct who would care for 
them and give them tenderness. For, after all, what help 
could they have derived from any of the types which their 
exigencies of the last decade had evolved ! The girls now 
began to wear longer and longer dresses ; they let their 
hair grow, and, while they still contrived to remain young 
and charming, they took on all the demure and exquisite 
womanliness of Southern belles before the Civil War. 

The talkies all show this. The reign of the uneducated 
and incredible crime heroines is over, and the chorus girl 
heroine, with her lovely legs, has also died. The males, 
recovering from their first stunning business blow and 
appreciating their new companions, are realizing that they 
are really the old ones, ever ready to follow their demands 
— and these demands now being for sympathy, collabora- 
tion in keeping the home going and helping to economize, 
a new race of really adorable females seems to be develop- 
ing. And the talkies are showing the new "IT." 

THE public has also had time to think during its im- 
poverished months. It has touched reality. The voice 
destroys illusions sooner than (Continued on page 123) 



THE CAUSE OF THE RAPID CHANCE IN MOVIE HEROINES 

17 




Her last was the fem- 
inine lead in a whal- 
ing story opposite a 
well known star. Her 
next will be a talkie 
version of a famous 
silent and stage play. 



He got his nose broken in 
a college football game. 
Taught mathematics at Cor- 
nell. Is something of a 
linguist. And a cultured 
gentleman at heart. Piayed 
an important part in one 
of the best war pictures 
ever filmed. 



KNOW 
THEM? 



You will get a smile and a 
grin from these clever car- 
icatures by the well-known 
artist, Alex Card 





He's famous for his 
gangster roles— with 
iew exceptions. Does 
good work in an ex- 
cellent prison story 
which is having a big 
Broadway run. 



She's a famous Mexican tor- 
nado. Usually plays a "wild- 
cat" role— and plays it to the 
hilt. Recently appeared in a 
talkie of the great North- 
west. Her name has long 
been linked with that of one 
of the most popular strong 
young he-men of the screen. 



She's famous for her long list of 
successes in which she always plays 
opposite the same romantic he-star. 
She recently walked off the lot— and 
stayed off it. But now she's back 
on the lot again — and working 
opposite the same romantic he-star. 



18 



4 



i 
I 




Photograph by Otto Dyar 



PORTRAITS 



Stanley Smith is capping his list of successes by drawing 
the leading role in "Manhattan Mary'/ 



19 




■■■■■■■BHHHHHHHNHHi 





21 




i 




Photograph by HurreM 



Joan Crawford's vivid personality will next be seen in 
"Great Day." "Our Blushing Brides" made a big hit 

everywhere. 



22 



-1 



'si 



3 





Photograph by Elmer Fryer 



Walter Huston's Lincoln was even better than expected. 
His next screen appearance will be in "The Honor of 

the Family'/ 



23 




Photograph by Fred R. Archer 

The unspoiled youth of Joan Bennett is one of the high- 
lights of pictures. She's working on "Smilin' Through." 

24 




Photograph by Ray Jones 



Handsome Lewis Ayres has two smash hits to his credit: 
"All Quiet" and "Common Clay." He's now making 
"Saint Johnson." 



25 



CARBONS 

HIDING 
PLACE 



—is her home. This tells of the 
amazing lengths to which the 
Swedish star has gone to keep her 
place of residence a secret 



By BOB MOAK 





Greta Garbo, the mag- 
nificent, whose desire 
for privacy has caused 
her almost to live the 
existence of a hermit. 



The entrance to Greta Garbo's hiding place. That white mark 
you see is a sign which showed the number of the house until 
our artist blotted it out. 

The photographs of Greta Garbo's present residence 
on these two pages were taken specially for The 
MODERN SCREEN Magazine. You will note that 
any hint of her address has been carefully avoided. 

26 



SOME day in the not too far distant future, and 
while she still has her youth, Greta Garbo is going 
to retire from the screen and return to her native 
Sweden. 

Then she is going to be herself, the one thing she hasn't 
been able to be in America! 

The secluded life she has led since setting foot on these 
shores four years ago is beginning to pall on her. She is 
tired of hiding . . . wearing disguises . . . dodging . . . 
of being alone. And she is wearied of moving ! 

But it has been decreed, and by the star herself, that 
the public must never see her in person, -for it is this 



shroud of mystery in which she has wrapped herself that 
has done much to make her one of the greatest of cinema 
box-office attractions. 

It has intrigued the world ! 

WHEN the late Maurice Stiller, the Swedish director, 
brought her to Hollywood to work for Metro- 
Goldwyn- Mayer, Greta was unable to speak or understand 
English. She knew nothing of American ways and cus- 
toms. She was very timid. 

She did the natural thing. She remained by herself 
and no one objected, for the name of Garbo meant noth- 
ing in screen circles at the time. While working, she 
would wander off alone to a corner of the stage between 
scenes. She seemed afraid that others on the lot were 
talking about her . . . making fun of her. 

Her only companions during her first year here were 
Stiller, then her fiance ; Nils Asther, another fellow coun- 
tryman, and her Swedish maid. Often she would walk 




new player. But she would not have it. Bad enough to 
be laughed at by fellow-workers, but not by America in 
general. She refused to permit photographers to snap her 
at breakfast or on the beaches. She refused to talk of 
her past, of love, of clothes and the other things they 
write about movie heroines. 

By the time "Flesh and the Devil" and "Love" were 
made in 1927, Garbo was way up on the list of fan mail 
recipients. 

"Who is she? Tell us more about her!" pleaded the 
theater-goers. But there was no response from Greta. 
She still believed her private life was her own. 

And her silence only increased the number of daily 
letters. The public had become more than interested. 

Then followed roles in "The Divine Woman" and "The 
Mysterious Lady." Her mail to the studio and to the 
movie magazines tripled. The public now demanded the 
facts about the golden haired Swede. 

By this time, however, Garbo had learned many of 

America's ways. She realized 
m ^^^^^^ maimmmmmammm that she stood out alone. The 

Bows, the Crawfords, the 
Gaynors and others could go 
on giving interviews for pub- 
lication . . . making public 
appearances . . . posing for 
advertisements. She wouldn't ! 

SHE demanded that the 
studio heads keep people 
away from her. She demanded 
that all visitors be barred from 
the sets on which she was 
working. She continued to 
dine in her dressing room and 
not with the others in the 
commissary. 

After much pleading on the 
part of M-G-M executives 
two years ago, Garbo granted 



■ 



This is the front of the house. 
The evergreens hide a con- 
crete wall which surrounds the 
grounds on both sides. Surely 
Garbo couldn't have found a 
better place for perfect 
seclusion. 

And this is the side View of 
her decidedly private house. 
Besides the concrete wall, 
there is, on the fourth side of 
the house, just out of vision 
in this picture, a fifty-foot 
sheer drop. Sure privacy! 




through the studio gates after a day before the cameras, 
a disappointed, discouraged and home-sick girl. 

When she was cast in "The Torrent" and immediately 
afterward in "The Temptress," the studio decided on the 
usual campaign of publicity to acquaint the fans with the 



a woman writer for a magazine a ten-minute interview. 
It was agreed in advance that there would be no extension 
of time. 

The writer began questioning the actress about her love 
affairs — past, present, future. Garbo talked only about 

27 




The famous Miramar Hotel 
where Carbo resided before the 
world became so interested in 
her way of living. She moved 
from here to the house pictured 
below. 



Carbo lived here undisturbed 
for several months, nobody be- 
ing able to discover her hiding 
place. But it was finally found 
out and Creta promptly moved. 



the weather, the Pacific Ocean. 

Then the things that Garbo 
didn't say were penned into a 
three-instalment story. It was 
the one and only interview 
ever granted by Garbo — 
bosses' orders or not. Many 
since have written "interviews" 
with Garbo, but they had not 
talked with her. 

"The Single Standard," 
"Wild Orchids" and "The 
Woman of Affairs" followed 
in 1928 and Garbo soared into 
full stardom because of the 
demand for her films. Her 
mail now ranked with that of 
Clara Bow, who held the 
record at the moment. 



GARBO more than ever 
determined to continue 
the shroud of mystery. 

It became known that she was living in one of the 
bungalows at the Miramar Hotel in Santa Monica. The 
crowds started patrolling the grounds seeking a glimpse 
of her. She couldn't stand it, so she leased a home in 
Beverly HTIIs and refused to reveaf the address to anyone 
but her manager. If the studio wanted to call her, it 
could be done through him. 

She continued to wear smoked glasses. She adopted 
brunette wigs. She continued to take her walks after 
dark. She still remained away from the gathering places 
of the other stars. It was even said that Garbo never had 
attended the premiere of one of her pictures. 

LAST February, a magazine wired me for a photo- 
j graph of Garbo's abode — and to "get it at any cost." 
I appealed to studio executives for her address. They 
swore they didn't know it. 

"All we have is her unlisted telephone number," they 
said. I. tried tracing that, without avail, because the phone 
company had strict orders from Miss Garbo not to reveal 
her address. 

There was one thing to do. I canvassed the Beverly 
Hills real estate offices. I failed again. Then I set out to 
cover the town. From door to door. I went ringing bells 
for two days. Finally, I found a maid who would talk. 




"Why, Greta Garbo lives right next door," she told me. 
I thanked her and summoned a photographer. 

"Set the camera up across the street, and get the front 
view first," I told him. As he finished the task, a big 
black sedan backed out of the driveway' and came tcr ar 
halt at the curbing. 

I recognized the girl at the wheel. It was Garbo sans 
disguise. A colored maid walked across the lawn. Garbo's 
eyes were on her as I approached from the other side. 

At last ! Not only a picture of the house, but an inter- 
view as well ! This was my lucky day. 

With Garbo still unheedful of my approach, I spoke: 

"Miss Garbo, I—." 

"Gott!" shrieked the lady at the wheel. 

And with that there was a clashing of gears, and the 
car sped away, coughing and leaping under the over-supply 
of gas that reached the cylinders as the Garbo foot gave 
the accelerator everything. Apparently the interview 
was over. The servant followed with speedy shoes. A 
block away, Garbo halted long enough to permit the maid 
to catch up. 

THREE days later, Garbo had moved, because, she 
said, she didn't want the world gaping and gazing 
as it does before the homes of other film notables. 



28 



But other writers and photographers took up the trail. 
So large was the army that it was only a matter of a few 
hours to cover all of Beverly. The new home was one 
owned by Marie Prevost. Greta must have peered 
through the windows while the men of the press were at 
work, for she moved the following day. This despite the 
fact that she had paid three months' rent in advance. 

Her next location was the place where she is living now. 

While Matt Moore doesn't know anything about it, it 
was his police dog that led me to Garbo's modest house not 
far from one of her former residences. 

For I had been ordered by The Modern Screen Maga- 
zine to get a picture of her present abode — -but on no ac- 
count to divulge the address, or even the name of the 
district in which the house is situated. 

I determined to canvass the houses of the district in 
which I had heard that Garbo was now living. I had 
ended my first block of bell-ringing and returned to my 
car when I glimpsed Matt's canine across the street, en- 
joying a nap on the lawn. 



Club, where they dance once a month. If she ever has 
visited the Blossom Room or Cocoanut Grove, she has been 
so completely disguised that even persons who have 
worked in her pictures didn't recognize her. 

SOCIAL functions are given by Douglas Fairbanks 
and Mary Pickford and other leaders of the industry, 
including Greta's chief, Louis B. Mayer, for visiting roy- 
alty. The guests are limited to a select few. Garbo al- 
ways is invited because even Kings and Queens want to 
meet this elusive person as much as do the John and Mrs. 
Does of America. But Greta never accepts. 

It wasn't so long ago that Marion Davies gave a dinner 
at her beach house for Lord and Lady Mountbatten, 
cousins of the Prince of Wales. Her Ladyship, asked if 
there was anyone in particular she would like to meet, re- 
plied : 

"Miss Garbo." 

Marion, one of Greta's co-workers on the M-G-M lot. 
urged her to come. Garbo was (Continued on page 125) 





And just then Greta Garbo herself and in person rushed 
out of the house to shoo the dog away. 

I went into the corner drug-store and called up the pho- 
tographer. 

TOURISTS wait outside the Montmartre, the Roose- 
velt and Cocoanut Grove ; they line the thoroughfares 
on premiere nights ; drive up one street and down another, 
all in hopes of seeing Garbo. But few succeed. 

Once, sometimes twice a week, Garbo motors into 
Hollywood to the Bank of America branch at Hollywood 
Boulevard and Whitley Avenue, to make deposits and buy 
gilt edge investments. But on these visits, her chauffeur 
has instructions to continue on if she thinks someone 
might be watching for her. Once inside, she closets her- 
self with the manager, never remaining in view while she 
makes out her deposit slip. 

Seldom does she visit Hollywood stores. When she 
does, she pays her visit at the opening hour and .before the 
crowds are in the shops. Generally, she does 
her buying by having the store send samples to 
her home or her dressing room. 

Garbo isn't a member of the Embassy Club, 
where the stars lunch and dine to escape the 
tourists who flock to the Montmartre. Neither 
does she belong to the movie folks' Mayfair 



This house which is located at 
Camden Drive and Carmelita 
Avenue, Beverly Hills, and 
owned by Marie Prevost, 
was occupied by Carbo for 
twenty-four hours. 

As long as Carbo is a star, 
the world will be interested 
in her private life. So, it 
seems, she will continue her 
present secretive mode of 
living indefinitely. 




29 



THE BIG 




Jane Arden 




OF 



Every one of these names and faces is un- 
known to you— yet you have seen these 
people many times on the screen. Meet 
Hollywood's most successful extras— and 
be amazed at their meager rewards 



Eleanor Vanderveer 



Paula Drendell 



Margaret Cray 



Ti 



i HE value of a motion picture star, on the hoof, 
perhaps, should be judged by the number of pic- 
tures in which he appears. This is not true in the 
case of Charlie Chaplin, of course, or Harold 
Lloyd or Douglas Fairbanks. 

But with a few exceptions, the big salaries — if in these 
hard times there are any left when these words reach 
your deep blue eyes, my dear — should go to the folks 
who are on the set the most days in the year. 

Buddy Rogers, Joan Crawford, Clara Bow, to select a 
few, are on the job most of the time. They work stead- 
ily because the box office demands them. And there's no 
barometer of popularity like box office demand. 

With this in mind suppose you sit right down and 
name the Big Eight of Hollywood — the four men and 
the four women who work in more pictures than any- 
body else. 

Gary Cooper? Richard Barthelmess? Dorothy Mac- 
kail ? Ronald Colman ? Bebe Daniels ? 
Don't bother any more. You're all wrong. 

HpHE Big Eight of Hollywood are : 
A Women : Jane Arden, Eleanor Vanderveer, Paula 
Drendell and Margaret Gray. 

M en : Babe Green, William Boardway, Fred Lee and 
James Kilgannon. 

"Who," you exclaim, "in the name of Saint Broncho 
Billy, are they?" 

THEY may be an octette of unknowns to you, but call 
Hollywood 3701, which is the Central Casting Bu- 
reau, and no matter who answers the phone — the janitor 
stays until midnight— he will rattle off more intimate de- 
tails about them — their age, color of hair, weight, accom- 
plishments and wardrobe, than you'd ever want even your 
roommate to know about you. 

Jane and Eleanor and Paula and Margaret, Babe and 
Bill and Fred and Jimmie are the world's greatest extra 
people and they have worked in more pictures in the last 
two years than any other eight persons on earth. If you 
could look over the casting sheet of any picture now in 
the making, it's a safe bet that you would find at least 
one of these names on the roll. 

The four women averaged two hundred -days each out 
of a possible three hundred and twelve, for each of the 
last two years. The men's average was four days less. 

If you're going to the movies tonight, look closely at 
that crowd on the country club veranda, or the gang in 




30 



HOLLYWOOD 



By JEROME BEATTY 



the speakeasy, or the dancers at the costume ball. One or 
more of the eight are rather sure to be there. 



THESE eight are the best of 17,541 men, women and Q reen 
children who are registered at the Central Casting 
Bureau in Hollywood — champions in their line, they are. 
They have reached the peak toward which are climbing 
thousands of ambitious young men and young women who 
have cut loose from the Home Town and who are seeking 
a movie career. 

The best, surely, must be well paid. 
Well — Jane Arden, who has earned more in the last 
two years than any other extra, averaged only $47.45 a 
week. Babe Green, who topped the men, averaged $46.95. 

The average weekly wage of the eight, for two years, 
was $42.57. 

For champions — $42.57 a week ! 

But even that is not so bad, as you will learn if you 

snoop around Hollywood and ask about the earnings of 

the others who make up the 17,000 who are seeking the .»/.■■. D ■ 

•l^. , j j - . it. . . William Boardway 

eight or nine hundred jobs that are open to extras every ' 

day. The average wage of an extra is $2.63 a week. Not 
a day — a week ! 

Each successful extra must be equipped with a ward- 
robe that would satisfy Peggy Joyce or the Prince of 
Wales — almost. Jane Arden, for instance, has among 
other things, fifteen hats, twenty-one pairs of shoes, seven 
evening dresses and four evening wraps. Babe Green 
owns full dress, tuxedo, sport suits, military uniforms, 
cutaway, knickers, riding habit and every sort of ordinary 
clothing. 

AN inventory of the wardrobe of any of the four girls 
l would show that it cost more than $2,000. The 
men — it's always the men who get the breaks in this cold 
world: — can get along with $1,000 worth of clothes. But 
the upkeep of dress shirts is rather high, especially in the p re£ j |_ ee 
warm weather when it takes two a day for even an 
ordinary job. 

Ten dollars a day is the usual wage for these extra 
people and the producers are not taking any unkind ad- 
vantage of anybody when they buy this casual labor. 
Extras are mighty glad to get $10 a day and to work a 
little more than an average of four days a week, for they 
know that if the producers wanted to hire extras at bed 
rock prices they could fill the stages by offering half that, 
so great does the supply exceed the demand. 

They're earnest, hard working people, these eight, who 
represent the best in extradom. Some are married. Some 
had responsible jobs before they decided to tackle Holly- 
wood. All, at one time, had aspirations toward stardom 
but now they're resigned to their fate and have decided 
they'd rather be first class extras and work and eat reg- 
ularly than waste their time fighting for parts, which James Kilgannon 
come seldom these doleful days. 



IT'S about time these important members of the cast 
received some publicity. You ought to know more 
about them and how they got that way. So here you are : 
Jane Arden is twenty- four and she got a break because 
she was a good swimmer and happened to live in Los 
Angeles. In 1925, she heard that they wanted, at the 
Fox studio, girls who could swim. She went out and 
asked for a job and they gave it to her. That was all 



NAME 


Jane Arden 




WARDROBE 


ADDRESS 


phone Ho 8913 


Very complete 


ADDRESS 


phone He 3715 




EXP. PICT 


1 yr exp. leg. Some 




TY=E 


CLASSIFICATION 




AGE 


19 HEIGHT 5—5 WEIGHT 


116 




CHEST 


WAIST HAIP.Bl0nfl*YES Dt BlV 


e 


SPORTS 


Drive. Swim. Dance. 








REMARKS 



2-28-28 



SPECIALTIES 



Has played -parts, ingenue 



leads. Sidney Olcott, 



Henry Otto 



0. K. Dress A 
Good figure. 



N.C. 



FORM U ?M 1?.7D 



Here is Jane Arden's 
information card which 
the Central Casting 
Bureau keeps on hand 
for immediate use when 
a busy casting director 
calls up impatiently. 



there was to it. She built up an 
extensive wardrobe and, she ad- 
mits, maybe they call her more 
often for her clothes than for 
her dramatic ability. 

Eleanor Vanderveer is forty- 
three years old and has a daugh- 
ter who is away at school. She 
is in demand because she is dis- 
tinguished looking and is valu- 
able in dressing a set that needs 
a variety of types. She attended 
the University of Washington 
for three years and has been in 
pictures nine years. 

PAULA DRENDELL went 
to Eos Angeles from San 
Francisco where she had been 
employed as a secretary. She is 
a graduate of Gardner Boarding 
School in New York City. She 
is thirty-two years old and can 
speak lines, swim, dance and 
drive. She supports her mother 
and has no income except her ex- 
tra's pay. She has been in mo- 
tion pictures seven years, and, 
like Eleanor Vanderveer, refutes 
the assertion that only ingenues 
get jobs as extra girls. Both of 
them look as if they "belonged" 
when they're cast as guests at a 
party on a Long Island estate. 

Margaret Gray, twenty years 
old, born in Dallas, Texas, is 
fourth in earnings among the ex- 
tra girls and, because of her 



Act 


Jewish 


Blonde 


Large 


Beautiful 


Long-Haired 


Comedy 


Latin 


Character- Young 


Maids 


Character-M.A. 


Nurses 


Character-Elderly 


Riding 


Dress- Young 


Specialties 




Swimmers 


Dress-M.A. 






Small 


Dress-Elderly 




Stunt 


Dancers 


Tall 




Eccentric 


Thin 


Fat 


Toothless 


Good Figure 


Underworld 


Good-looking 


Voluptuous 


Gray-Haired 


Remarks 


Hags-Old 


Speak Lines 


Ingenue or Collegiate 


Singing Voice 



Above is the amusing list which 
adorns the back of the Casting 
Bureau's file card. You get an 
X opposite each description you 
fit. Make out your own. 



beauty, has risen quickly to the 
top. When she left the Univer- 
sity of Southern California she 
went to work as a secretary in 
Harry Langdon's production 
unit, and soon edged away from 
the typewriter and into the lights. 
Keep your eye on Margaret. 

Myron C. Green, who prefers 
to be known as "Babe," tops the 
men in total wages. He went to 
Los Angeles from Kansas City 
where he was graduated from 
the Kansas City School of Law. 
He is thirty-three years old and, 
in Kansas City, sold motor cars 
and at one time was part owner 
in a wholesale grocery firm. He 
has been in motion pictures eight 
years. 

WILLIAM BOARDWAY, 
second most successful 
male extra, supports a wife and 
two children by extra work. He 
is forty years old, a good rider 
and plays bits now and then. He 
is rated as "distinguished look- 
ing" and many a time he has 
played, at $10 a day, a member 
of the board of directors of a 
billion dollar corporation. He is 
a graduate of Oswego, N. Y., 
high school and at one time was 
a partner in the Birk-Boardway 
Tire Co., at 828 Main Street, 
Buffalo, N. Y. This is his fifth 
year (Continued on page 123) 



These extras are champions in their line* You can learn what 
they earn, what clothes they must wear and many other details 



32 



HOLLYWOOD 




"Moby Dick," John Barrymore's 
latest vehicle, has a couple of 
shocking surprises. 



By 

GEORGE GERHARD 



IF there is any lingering doubt, 
after a perusal of recent pictures, 
that the movies are coming of 
age, one has but to listen closely 
to some of the dialogue of "Moby 
Dick," John Barrymore's second at- 
tempt at the Herman Melville classic. 
For here, certainly, in the words of 
the gardener, a spade is a spade. 

On two separate occasions in that 
opus, salty old mariners give vent to 
the quaint language of truck-drivers. 
They speak as sailors have spoken in 
times of stress from time immem- 
orial, although from the very begin- 
ning screen characters have been say- 
ing "darn" and "drat it" when you 
know in your heart they are thinking 
something quite different. 

If you are proficient in lip read- 
ing, you'll probably recall some of 
the nice words employed by Victor 
McLaglen and Edmund Lowe in 
"What Price Glory?" but that was a 
silent picture, and you had to be good 
at reading lips to get the drift of 
what was said. Here, though, the 
ears have it. 

WILLIAM POWELL nearly de- 
veloped into a hero in Europe, 
it leaked out upon his return to the 
Paramount studio in Hollywood. 
Hill was explaining how he arrived 
in Naples the day after the terrific 
earthquake which scourged that part 
of the country. "Everything was in 
confusion," he said, "although the 



HIGHLIGHTS 

Presenting a popular critic of Hollywood and 
its products who is not afraid of truth 




Ben Lyon saved the producer of 
"Hell's Angels" from making a 
serious mistake. 




William Powell, back from 
Europe, pulls a new one on the 
old "double" theme. 



Robert Woolsey, the 
comedy kid, registers a 
complaint about his lead- 
ing ladies. 



city of Naples didn't show as much evi- 
dence of the disaster as you'd expect." 

"Did you rescue anybody?" someone 
asked. 

"Why, how could I ?" returned the 
star. "I didn't have any double with me." 

MORE than one person who has 
seen "Hell's Angels" has re- 
marked upon the American dialect of 
its portrayers, although the story's lo- 
cale is England and that part of France 
in which English flyers were stationed. 
And there's a reason. 

When casting was being done for the 
picture Howard Hughes began to as- 
semble young men whose qualities em- 
braced an English accent as well as a 
knowledge of flying during the war. 
But Ben Lyon, who had been chosen 
for the leading role, instantly saw the 
pitfall in this. Consequently he ex- 
plained to the producer that if all other 
players spoke with English accents they 
would show up the Americanese of 
Lyon and James Hall. 
Thus the change. 

ROBERT WOOLSEY. who has for- 
saken the stage for Radio Pictures, 
is wondering just how long it will be be- 
fore he is permitted to have a leading 
woman who doesn't tower over him. In- 
deed, Bob has created a slogan, "Give 
me smaller women!" 

Woolsey's first real picture was "Rio 
Rita," in which Helen Kaiser was his 
lady-love. She (Continued on page 111) 




EAVESDROPPING 
ON WILL 

ROGERS 

In this novel feature, Will 
Rogers— who rarely grants 
an interview— gives his de- 
lightful views on a number 
of important subjects 



By 

ROBERT 

FENDER 





WILL ROGERS says: 

That the young folks of today are no 
wilder than those of any other generation. 

That the old-time custom of "visiting" 
was responsible for driving the children 
from the home. 

That the modern kids should have more 
animals as companions. 

That people who want to get into the 
movies ought to stick their heads in the 
noose of a rope, tie the rope around the 
branch of a tree and then lose their balance. 



Movie actor, author, wit and philospher, 
Will Rogers has proven himself an ever- 
flowing source of delight to hundreds of 
thousands of people both here and abroad. 
His words of wisdom have the added 
feature of being funny as well as true. 



WILL ROGERS is one man who doesn't grant 
interviews — consciously. In the first place he 
doesn't like to sit still long enough for the 
writer to work on him. In the second, he pre- 
fers to do the job himself, at so much the word. Long 
ago I started figuring on a way to remedy the situation. 
The happy idea came last week when I went to the Fox 
lot for an interview with a less interesting person. 

We were having luncheon in the Fox Munchers' 
Club when in came Rogers, closely followed by John 
Blystone and Frank Borzage, Fox directors. They 
took a table next to mine and started their conversa- 
tion with a bang. "Their conversation," it soon de- 
veloped, was little more than a game of questions and 
answers, with Will on the receiving end. 

What the two didn't ask Will isn't worth asking. 
And for every query shot at him, Will had an answer; 
a good answer, that made the others rock with laughter 
and forget to eat their food. I decided to interview 
my man another day and, finding pencil and paper, 
settled down to catch some of the stuff Mr. Rogers 
was passing out. 

First you should have a snap of Will Rogers as he 
sat there that day, dispensing humor and good old- 
fashioned wisdom. If you have seen him on the screen 
you already have that snap, for Will Rogers is pre- 
cisely the same, in pictures and out. But if you feel 
that you don't know the (Continued on page 116) 



35 



ALL JOKING ASIDE — B y jack welch 




G^ETA GAC?BO HAS MEVlER 



36 



I TANK I GO l-AOME 



THAT 
EL-US/V/e 

ricmarp d/x, 
mas taken oltt 
qnJe" marriage lic- 
emsb lf>i his l/fe" and that tinve-tme 

NUPTIALS' /NPEF/NTTEtY fb>STR>/ED 



Mr. Thome, man-about-town. 
Do you know who he really is? 
You say you do. But do you 
know why he is a certain Mr. 
Thorne of Hollywood? 



THE 




The first of a series 
in which hitherto 
unrevealed facts of 
the film city are 
delightfully disclosed 

By WALTER 

RAMSEY 



UNKNOWN 
HOLLYWOOD 



THE card below the iron 
knocker says simply: "Mr. 
William Thorne .... 
Apartment No 3-B." 
The neighbors, who for Holly- 
wood are not particularly snoopy 
neighbors (since the apartment is 

isolated from the beaten path of Hollywood gossip), know 
the occupant of No. 3-B merely as "a quiet gentleman 

. . whose apartment is often closed 
and who does very little entertain- 
for granted that he has business 



A CERTAIN 
MR. THORNE 



who comes and goes 



it 



for days at a time 
ing." They take 
out of town. 

It might interest both the neighbors and the trades- 
people to know that "Mr. Thorne" has another home and, 
incidentally, another name. It might even alarm them. 
Gentlemen who live as this gentleman has lived over a 
period of years under the guise of an assumed name, 
often have too much to hide to make ideal neighbors and 
creditors ! 

Mr. Thorne has considerable to hide and considerable to 
gain by his disguise ! 

To the police, and the world at large, he is known as 
William Powell . . . sleek, suave gentleman gambler and 
cosmopolite of the screen ! 

There is a price on his head . . . the price of publicity! 

William Powell, as a matter of fact, is supposed to be 
living quietly in a regulation movie star's home with his 
mother. It is at this address that he receives his calls 
. . . does his entertaining. Unfortunately, there were so 
many telephone calls — so many friends— so much imposi- 
tion on his time that two years ago the mysterious "Mr. 
Thorne" was born . . . for privacy's sake. 

And while it is true that Mr. Thorne is a great deal 
different from Mr. Powell, it is also true that Mr. Thorne 



is the real William Powell in the 
process of living and being as he 
prefers to live and be. 

By the same token, x'Vpartment 
No. 3-B is much more revealing 
of the real personality of this 
fascinating figure than any story 
that could be concocted about the screen man. 

A quaint place it is — quiet, restful and oft* the well- 
worn path of Hollywood Boulevard. One finds pictur- 
esque little Mexican cottage-apartments surrounding a 
bubbling fountain, and at night, dim lights show faintly 
through the foliage. Mr. Thome's apartment is just be- 
yond the fountain and over to the left. 

Three rooms : a small kitchen, a typical man's bedroom 
with bath, and a colorful living room in bright red velour 
comprise the quarters. There is no servant. The tele- 
phone seldom rings. Too few people have the number. 



R 



I ARE first editions tumble over the bookshelves in 
helter-skelter fashion. A strange variety of books. 
Great classics and works of art rub shoulders with spicy 
volumes of current sensationalism. Suppressed volumes 
find themselves next to poems of exquisite beauty and 
works of philosophy and religion. They are not arranged. 
These books are too often jerked out, and too hurriedly 
replaced to make for any order of arrangement. 

Cigarette trays, generously sprinkled throughout the 
rooms, accumulate ashes for days before Mr. Thorne gets 
around to emptying them. Last week's newspaper is as 
convenient as yesterday's. 

Sometimes he makes his bed . . . sometimes he doesn't ! 
A lovely Spanish lady smiles an etched smile from her 
perch on the bedroom wall. Next to her, a wrinkled fish- 
erman in water-color is hauling (Continued on page 113) 

37 



GOOD-BYE, 

LON 



A "straight" picture of the late 
Lon Chaney. Very, very few 
such pictures of him were ever 
made, as he preferred to keep 
his real personality something of 
a mystery. 






A study from his lirst and 
only talkie, the talking screen 
version of "The Unhoiy 
Three," which was also made 
in the days of the silents. 



As the Hunchback in "The 
Hunchback of Notre Dame," 
Chaney made one of his 
greatest successes and became 
world famous. 



Here he is as Black Mike Silva 
in "Outside the Law," a picture 
which has just been made again 
as a talkie— but without Chaney. 



DEATH prepared the final mask for "the 
man of a thousand faces." 
Bravely, Lon Chaney fought against 
playing that last role. But anemia and 
bronchial congestion, aftermaths of a recent pneu- 
monia attack, culminated in a hemorrhage which 
robbed the world of one of its most picturesque 
and talented performers. 

Then, the man who hated and assiduously 
shunned publicity throughout his life, became, in 
death, the center of ironically prominent ululations 
from the press. 

One more genuine and heartfelt farewell is here- 
with added to the throng. 
"Good-bye, Lon." 

There is irony in the thought that the man who 
long fought against the spoken word in pictures is 
silenced forever. 

But Lon was truly greatest as a pantomimist. 

38 



Despite the prodigious vocal versatility displayed 
in "The Unholy Three," it seemed apparent that 
his biggest success depended upon the effect of 
horror and fascinating gruesomeness conveyed by 
his amazing personations in silent pictures. 

THE man's background led inevitably to his 
outstanding virtuosity as a pantomimist. 
He was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on 
April 1, 1883. 

This April Fool's Day child himself enjoyed and 
approved the witticism which suggested a per- 
petual April Fool's joke — "Don't step on it, it 
may be Lon Chaney." 

His mother and father both were deaf and dumb. 
In order to make himself understood to them, it 
was necessary for him to converse with gestures 
and signals. Fate could never have contrived a 
more ingenious training for the embryo master of 
make-up and visual expressiveness. 

For some time Lon was a Pike's Peak guide. 
Then he became a property boy in an opera 
company. 

In his teens he appeared in a play written by 
himself and his brother. 




The greatest charac- 
ter actor of them all 
plays his last role 



At the left we see him in "Tell 
It to the Marines." This was 
one of the very few pictures 
which Chaney played "straight." 




This, perhaps, was one of his 
best make-up achievements. 
It's the Phantom, of course, 
from "The Phantom of the 
Opera," and reaches the 
height of gruesomeness. 



This picture of Chaney and 
Renee Adoree is from "The 
Mocking Bird." His charac- 
terization was splendid in 
this, but it did not make the 
hit which some others did. 



Then the brothers presented Gilbert and Sullivan 
operettas to a western world starved for worthy 
theatrical amusements. 

Lon became a stagehand. He carried his union 
card proudly till his dying day. 

He was connected with an opera company (one 
of whose members became his second wife and 
survives him) ; this company toured to Los An- 
geles where the youthful movies appealed to Lon's 
imagination. 

AS an extra in a Universal picture he soon at- 
. tracted attention with his careful concentra- 
tion on perfect make-up and performance. He 
played "heavy" parts in western pictures ; he acted 
in a slapstick comedy ; he directed J. Warren 
Kerrigan in a number of films. 

No one who ever saw his characterization of 
the Frog in "The Miracle Man" can ever forget it. 
It was shocking, fascinating, sensational. It was 
his first great popular achievement. Typical evi- 
dence of his willingness to make almost any phys- 
ical sacrifice for his art is the fact that he perma- 
nently injured a shoulder as a result of contortions 
demanded by that role. 



In this, too, "Where East Is East," 
Chaney played one of his few "no 
make-up" parts— merely disfigur- 
ing his face by tremendously ugly 
expressions. 



In all of his pictures, other than "Tell It to the 
Marines," and "Where East Is East," this amaz- 
ingly versatile actor gloried in each new oppor- 
tunity for a more startling and nerve-wracking 
characterization. He became the symbol of mys- 
tery and unrecognizable disguise. 

AMONG the many fascinating stories told about 
. him, one, which reached us through intimate 
channels, narrates the alleged fact that he severed 
relationship with Universal because he was refused 
a requested raise of fifty dollars a week. Ever 
since then, the story goes, he demanded an addi- 
tional fifty dollars on the figure of any contract 
which he signed. It was the symbol to him of 
poetic justice, a sort of compensation for the 
ineffectuality of the actor whose greatness is not 
yet recognized. Subse- (Continued on page 125) 

39 



1 





Adele Whitely Fletcher, one of the discoverers 
of Clara Bow. She has known Clara for a 
good many years and in this letter she gives 
the star some very sound advice. 

A document of straight- 
foward common sense and 
uncompromising frankness, 
written by the woman who 
sponsored this famous actress 
before fame ever touched her 

By ADELE 
WHITELY FLETCHER 




Clara as she looked long before "it" deserved 
a capital letter. It was at just about this stage of 
her career that she used to drop into Miss 
Fletcher's office seeking advice. 



DEAR CLARA : 
The one unforgiveable sin is stupidity. And I 
feel you're being so very stupid. That is why the 
newspapers bandy your name. That is why you 
are called into the "front office" and given fair warning. 
(And it is fair warning, for the ill advised things you say 
and do seriously jeopardize the fortune your producers 
have invested in you.) 

Clara Bow Pays Thirty Thousand for Love, 

40 



scream the headlines. And a story follows, written to 
serve yellow journalism before truth, telling how a de- 
serted wife has won a fortune from you because she 
alleges you stole her husband's affections. 

Of course there is no possible excuse for your deliber- 
ately seeing enough of any married man to become in- 
terested in him. Surely you have heard about men being 
misunderstood at home often enough to know how much 
such stories are worth. 



This is a very recent studio portrait of the 
famous exponent of sex appeal. All the 
ballyhoo to the contrary, Miss Fletcher 
thinks Clara is still a country girl at heart. 



It was as the "It" girl above that Clara Bow 
made herself world famous and at the same time 
became a target for every newspaper reporter 
all over the globe who was searching for a story. 



AN OPEN LETTER 
TO CLARA BOW 



I cannot help feeling, incidentally, that affections so 
easy alienated are not worth the exorbitant price placed 
upon them by outraged wives in court. 

You are far from stupid. You must have known per- 
fectly well how that affair would react against you. You 
must have realized that your company would insist upon 
an expensive settlement out of court. Surely you would 
not risk all of this for the sake of a lark. It is only reason- 
able to suppose that you had one of those feverish 
"crushes" so compatible with your years. 

However, you cannot possibly go on and on counting 
the world well lost for love. Not that such behavior 
makes you a bad girl, to my mind. Rather it makes you 
soft and stupid, a harem scarem, and something of a little 
fool. The truly wicked woman doesn't emerge from her 
love affair thirty thousand dollars poorer. Instead she 
has a square cut emerald, a neat little stack of gilt edge 
securities and a mink coat for her souvenirs. Yet, curi- 
ously enough, the same newspapers that write derogatory 



stories about your love affairs, treat the ladies most famous 
for the handsome presents given them by their "sweeties" 
with far more respect and consideration than they could 
possibly deserve. I never have quite understood that. 

YOU are described as an exaggeration of an already 
too heedless generation, as sophisticated and a girl of 
the world. I see you very differently, as a little country 
girl ; unequal to the importance the movies have given her ; 
too soft to rule Fame. You are, after all, the child of that 
man and woman who turned their backs on their farm, 
your mother doubtless with tears in her eyes and fear 
crouched within her heart, and your father, after the way 
of men, sanguine about conquering the city. 

Had your mother lived she might have saved you some 
of your mistakes. A country girl that leaves the soil is 
likely to have learned many hard lessons and to be in a 
position to give sound and practical advice. 

It must have been very hard for her to leave you. 

41 





Clara's newest picture will be called "Her Wedding Night" in 
which she plays opposite Ralph Forbes. It is a French farce-comedy. 



You were so young, tenderly curved, your eyes deep and 
clear and sparkling. There were healthy freckles on your 
nose then. You were always forgetting to powder it. And 
you wore your hair, the loveliest chestnut brown, pinned 
softly in your neck. 

1HAVE seen you since with rubies and diamonds 
sparkling on your arms and hands. I have seen the 
police open up a lane through the crowd for you on an 
opening night as you've stepped from a robin's egg blue 
Isotta Franchini. I have seen you breath-taking in white 
and emeralds and your flaming hair. But not for many 
years now have I seen you at your loveliest. 

42 



Often I remember you as you were the first time I 
saw you. Then you wore no jewels. Your dress was 
shabby and on your shoes there were the marks made by 
the clamps of your skates. Of course, most girls of the 
age you were would long since have given up racing down 
the street on roller skates. But you were a flyaway even 
then. And it is the very same love of life, the very same 
greediness for happiness that today threatens your future, 
your fame and your fortune. 

DO you remember how you personally brought to the 
magazine offices the photographs you wanted en- 
tered in a beauty contest? It is well you did. Had you 



mailed them I doubt that the little pronoun "It" ever 
would have known any but its original Websterian signifi- 
cance. (Parenthetically, I'm certain Elinor Glyn's descrip- 
tion of your gift for living as "It" has been something of 
a boomerang. If she gave you an immediate colorful im- 
portance she also made you a target for every reporter 
out after a story. And you and I know it is by such 
things that reputations are both made and destroyed.) 

The photographs you entered in that contest were poor 
things. A cheap neighborhood man had taken them, re- 




touching your face until all that remained was a great 
white blur, all the lovely planes and curves gone from it. 

The associate editor who was conducting the prelimi- 
naries of that contest asked me to come into her office and 
see you. Sated as we both were by beauties, you gave us 
pause. And we wrote a little note to the eminent judges, 
urging them not to judge you by those pictures but to see 
you personally. They did. You won that contest. It was 
inevitable. And now the intervening years have become 
screen history. 

IT is high time you were given credit for the way in 
which you conducted yourself in those trying and criti- 
cal days. Many of the girls who came to stand before the 
judges attempted to flirt with them. Many made it very 
obvious they were willing to accept any engagement any 
judge might care to make. Others wore dresses deliber- 
ately revealing. Anything to curry favor. However, 
their wiles gained them nothing and you were the judges' 
choice. 

I can see you now standing in that line-up of beauties 
from every state in the Union. There was nothing of the 
siren about you. You were more like a little girl on a line 
at school. You met the judges' glances frankly. You did 
what they asked you to do with a refreshing naturalness. 

Then there was that much older man who fancied you. 
He was powerful. He could have advanced you rapidly. 
He was obviously in a position to fulfill every fabulous 
promise he made. No wonder I was afraid for you. You 
wanted so much to get ahead, for your mother's sake. You 
wanted to help her escape the poverty that intensified her 



The author of this open letter declares that 
Clara Bow has been as spendthrift with her 
emotions as she has been with her money. 
What do you think? 



invalidism. You wanted to get her out of that mean little 
flat. You wanted her to have a big sunny room, soft bed 
things, flowers, jellies ... all the little luxuries that mean 
so much when anyone is ill. 

SOME days you came into my office, all the light gone 
from your eyes. Then I would know without your 
telling me that your mother was worse and the fear 
had overcome you again that your success would come too 
late to avail her anything. Tragically enough, she did die 
before "Down to the Sea in Ships" put a little gold in your 
purse and definitely promised you stardom. 

However, never by one word or one glance did you en- 
courage your persuasive, influential admirer. Yet you 
managed to avoid his most importunate advances without 
hurting his pride any more than was absolutely necessary. 
You were almost gentle with him. 

It was, you see, evident from the very beginning that 
you were not one to love a man for what he could give 
you. If you were it would be futile for me to write 
such a letter as this to you now. 

I AM sure, incidentally, that you'll never be able to 
deal as harshly with men as some of them may deserve. 
You seem to know a pity for men and to regard them as 
impractical, eager children. Instinctively you seem to 
appreciate the enslavement which the predatory sex — the 
breadwinners — have to bear. No wonder even those men 
previously critical about you meet you to forget their 
prejudices. I very much doubt that you've ever nagged a 
man. You are more inclined to spoil them. Your attitude, 
even towards your father, is an indulgent one. You are 
more a mother than a daughter {Continued on page 112) 

43 



"There's my career," she said, looking 
away from him. "1 couldn't let mar- 
riage interfere with it." 



- - - LITTLE 



AFTER the telephone rang, it took Sue Arden 
fifteen minutes to compose herself. She 
smoothed her hair and lit a cigarette with trem- 
bling hands. Derek Hughes' voice, even over the 
telephone, had a strange effect upon her. Derek was the 
best director in Hollywood and Sue Arden loved him. 
The conversation had been something like this : 
"Sue dear . . ." 
"Yes, Derek ..." 

"I'm going to throw Lola Marvel out of the part in 
'Recompense' and put you in. Will you take it?" 

"Will I iakc it!" Would she take it? Magnifkent's 
biggest picture of the year . . . Derek's dream, the picture 
he had been wanting to make ever since he had started 
directing ! 

"Sue," Derek had said then, "I love you. Strange that 
I should tell you over the telephone, isn't it? I haven't had 
the courage, face to face, but . . . look, Sue, I must talk 
44 



with you. Can you see me in fifteen minutes? Will you 
listen?" 

"Will I listen . . ." and right there, Sue had broken off 
in the middle of her sentence and just hung on for dear 
life to keep from screaming. 

DEREK HUGHES loved her. What good did that do 
her? She loved him, too, but what good did it do 
either of them? She could never marry him. He was, 
after all, Derek Hughes, with generations of tradition 
behind him. 

Sue Arden's name was not Sue Arden. She had left her 
real name behind for very good reasons. She hated to think 
what she had left behind with her name. It wasn't pleasant. 

She jammed the cigarette in the ash receiver and tried 
to keep her chin from quivering. Pictures raced back and 
forth before her. It was as though she were reviewing 
the rushes of her latest talkie, seeing herself in impossible 



There is no popular writer today who packs so much pathos and 
vividness in so few words-as our Hollywood fiction offering proves 



tragic situations, watching her face twist in agony. The 
only difference was that the picture would have a happy 
ending, a solution, and there was not hope of that in 
reality. Life gives its actors no happy endings. 

Suppose she told Derek . . . here she shuddered. She 
couldn't. He wouldn't believe her any more than the 
others had. If she told him that she was Merle Caron 
. . . tliat Merle Caron . . . his eyebrows would do the same 
funny things that the eyebrows of the others had. She 
laughed shakily. When it came down to it, she had 
changed her name and her identity to escape eyebrows. 

Still, Derek had not been in the States at that time. He 
couldn't know how they had crucified her. He couldn't 
know much about it. If she said slowly, "I am Merle 
Caron," and he said nothing except that Sue Arden was 
a better name for pictures, she would be safe. But even if 
this did happen there was his career to consider. After 
all, there were people in the United States who had not 
been imported recently from England — people who did 
know all about Merle Caron. Headlines. Derek Hughes, 
Director, Marries Merle Caron. Horrible. She could not 
see Derek's eyes when it was hashed up in the newspapers 
for the benefit of their bloodthirsty public. 

SHE went in and dabbed powder on her nose, smoothed 
her hair again and just sat there twining and untwin- 
ing her fingers. Lacing them together, unlacing them, 
crushing them to make the pain pronounce her real and 
living. 

She could not marry Derek Hughes. She could not 
even let him know that she loved him. That was the worst 
she had to bear. Casually, she would say, "Oh, Derek, I 
don't want to marry. My career means so much to 
me ... " 

He would say then, "But you will continue your career. 
We will work together." 

She would then say, "Marriage kills an artist. No, 
Derek, let's not discuss it." And then she would die. She 



"Don't play a game with me, Sue," he said. "Do you 
love me at all? It isn't possible that I could love anyone 
as much as I love you without having it returned." 

"Conceited," she said, between stiff lips. 

His large, gentle hands went out and grasped hers, 
crushed them painfully. Still she stared at him with the 
blank stare of a woman who had nothing to give in return 
for his gifts. 

"Sue, you don't." 

"No," she said, "I don't." She sat down. 

"But you would, Sue. I promise you, you would." 

She shrugged slightly. She was like a small child try- 
ing to remember a lesson. "There's my career," she said, 
looking away from him. "I couldn't let marriage inter- 
fere with it." 

He sat on the divan dejectedly. "I'm just a fool," he 
said. "I thought . . . well, never mind. Will you go into 
Marvel's part in 'Recompense ?' " 

"If you think I can do it, and if you still want me," she 
said. 

"Your ability as an actress has nothing to do with my 
love for you," he said. "Of course I want you in the 
part. Be on the lot at nine will you ?" 

"Yes, Derek." 

THE door closed behind him and Sue sat where he had 
left her. She was not dead. She was alive and quiver- 
ing. It had been a good show. It had been an awfully 
good show. Who said she was not an actress? Her hands 
crept up and covered her mouth and the tears ran down 
between the knuckles and wet the palms of her hands. 

Derek lurched home to his apartment. It was dark, but 
Lola Marvel had not switched the lights on. She sat in 
the arm chair by the window waiting for him, a small, 
dark, fiery, jealous woman. 

"Well," she said, as he switched the light on and looked 
at her, "you've decided to put Arden in, haven't you?" 
"Yes." 



LIAR - 



couldn't imagine herself saying those words without dying. 

Looking in the mirror, she tried to recognize her face. 
Beautiful. Her mouth twisted a little bitterly. If it hadn't 
been so beautiful then things might have been easier. 

The doorbell rang. He came in. A tall, handsome 
man. A mature man. A man who had untold gifts for 
the woman he loved. He had brought them to offer them 
to her. She had put behind locked gates the love in her 
eyes. 

Elaborately casual, she offered him a cigarette. He 
shook his head. "No, Sue," he said, "I have to talk. Fast, 
Sue. I love you. I want to marry you." 

Her back was turned slightly. She looked over her 
shoulder, still casual. "How sweet of you, Derek," she 
said. 

"Look at me, Sue." 

She turned and looked at him ; put another lock on the 
gate and prayed that it would hold. 



By HAGAR WILDE 

Illustrated by Harve Stein 



"You're in love with her." It was a statement, not a 
question. 
"Yes." 

"And because you fall in love with a common little tart 
I get thrown out on my ear, is that it?" 

"You're thrown out on your ear because you're a cat 
to work with," he said. "That last scene you made, please 
God, will be the last. You've pulled hysterics all over 
the lot for weeks pretending that you had artistic temp- 
erament. Temperament, my eye. You can't even spell it. 
If you'd keep sober long enough to get your nerves into 
condition, I might be able to work with you. I've staked 
my reputation on 'Recompense' and you're not going to 
gum it. Everybody you work with gets a permanent case 
of jitters. Be nice now and go home. I want to be alone." 

"Oh, darling," she drawled, "you wouldn't put little 
Lola out in the cold, cold world when she's come to do you 
a favor, would you?" {Continued on page 117) 

45 



This is the Bohney family— Charles, Mrs. 
Bohney and Lillian. Maybe you know 
Lillian on the screen as— what? 



Not in a thousand years 
could you guess what Mary 
Astor's real name is. 



We have the pleasure of intro- 
ducing you to Asa Yoelson. 
Yes, that's the name, folks. 



Their REAL NAMES 



SHE was born in New York City and her name was 
Lillian Bohney. She could not pronounce Lillian 
when she was very young, so she called herself 
"Billie." A photographer taking her picture, 
asked her name. She told him. "Anyway, you look 
just like a little dove!" he exclaimed. "That's what I'll 
call myself when I become an actress!" cried Billie, 
with youthful enthusiasm, "Billie Dove!" 

It is an interesting fact that eight out of ten talking 
picture players have risen to fame with other names than 
their real, absolutely true ones. There are many reasons 
for this. Sometimes the real name is too long ; sometimes 
it is too difficult to spell or pronounce; sometimes nu- 
merology enters into the matter ; and at other times the 
original name is just too strange or foreign sounding. 

Undoubtedly you have at various time wondered 
whether or not the names your favorites go by are their 
very own. You surely have if the many inquiries that 
find their way to the question and answer columns of 
the different fan magazines are to be taken into 
account. 

TF I should ask you if you knew Guadalupe Villalobos, 
you would without doubt say "no." And yet, you 
really would know her all the time — not, of course, by 
that name, but by the name of Lupe Velez. 

Then we have Marilyn Reynolds — how many know 
this winsome young lady? Her name now happens to 
be Marilyn Miller. When her mother, who was an 
actress, divorced Marilyn's father and married Caro 
Miller, leading man of the theatrical company, Marilyn 
adopted the name of Miller. For several years she was 
left in the care of her grandmother, who lived in Memphis, 
Tennessee. It was from the pickaninnies Marilyn first 
learned to dance and sing. 

Actors and actresses don't always name themselves. 
Lucile Langhanke became Mary Astor by vote of the 



dramatic critics of New York newspapers. Virginia 
Chotsie Noonan became Sally O'Neil because Marshall 
Neilan, the director, thought that name fitted her per- 
fectly. Her sister was christened Molly O'Day by order 
of First National studio executives. Harry Cars, the 
writer and newspaperman, named June Marlow, as he 
didn't think any girl could make a success on the screen 
with the name Gizelda Goten. 

\/fOST people know Jean Arthur by that name alone, 
but Miss Arthur has often confided to her friends 
that her real name — the one she was born with — is Gladys 
Greene. 

Gary Cooper's last name is the real family name, but 
his first name is just an adopted one — in other words, 
Gary Cooper is really Frank Cooper. 

Betty Jane Young changed her name to Sally Blane 
and became quite a success on the screen. Her two 
sisters, Loretta and Polly Ann, didn't find the old family 
name a handicap to their success and so stuck to 
"Young." Loretta's first name, however, used to be 
Gretchen. 

Here are a couple of very famous names — Freeman 
F. Gosden and Charles J. Correll. Did you ever 
hear of them? What, you didn't? Shame on you! 
Ninety million people or more hear them every night. 
Gosden is "Amos" and Correll's "Andy," the famous 
"Amos 'n' Andy" radio, vaudeville, and now film team. 
They're to make a talkie for RKO and will receive 
one million dollars for same. Nothing cheap about 
them ! 

Rudy Vallee, another famous entertainer, used to be 
known to his friends as Herbert Prior Vallee, while 
Richard Arlen at one time went by the name of Richard 
Van Mattimore. You'd never guess Racquel Torres' real 
name, which happens to be totally different from her "reel" 
one — it is Billie Osterman. Gasp that off. 



A star by any other name not only shines as bright but brighter— 

46 



What's in a name? A whole 
lot says Jack Oaki'e who changed 
his from Offield. 



Here's Juanita Horton, the 
girl who made Broadway 
melodies famous. Get it? 



When Sue Carol married Nick Stuart, their 
names read this way on the marriage register. 
Evelyn Lederer and Niculae Pratza. 



"Don't give your right name," is a slogan well lived- 
up-to by the movie stars— and for all kinds of reasons 



By 

GORDON R. 
SILVER 



RET A GARBO was born Breta Gustaf sson ; Alice 
^ White is really Alva White, and by placing "Silver" 
before Arthur Lake's last name, you have that young 
actor's real name. 

Her birth name was Louise Dantzler, but when she 
first went into the movies to play Wendy in "Peter 
Pan," Director Herbert Brenon looked her over and de- 
cided to give her a new first and last name. He hit on 
Mary for the first and 
finally chose Brian to 
follow it. He hesitated 
several days as to 
whether or not an "O" 
should precede the word, 
but at last decided 
against it — thus came 
Mary Brian into being. 

When Gwen Le Pinski 
was a cloak model back 
in Omaha, she never 
thought she'd soon give 
up her last name for an- 
other. But she did. A 
prominent director saw 
her and suggested a 
screen test. The result 

was a trip to Hollywood — and Gwen Le Pinski became 
none other than Gwen Lee. 

John Gilbert used to be known as John Pringle ; Barry 
Norton was formerly Alfredo de Biraben, and believe it 
or not, Gilbert Roland was born with the name Luis 
Antonio Damoso de Alonzo ! Most everyone knows that 
Mary Pick ford's true name is Gladys Smith and the 
Barrymores' is Blythe, but — ah, here's some harder 
ones — do you know that Jeanette Loff used to go by the 
name of Jan Love? And that Fanny Brice is really 
Fanny Boroch ? It's a fact, believe it or not. . 



What do you think of Guadalupe Villalobos? And 
how do you like Gladys Greene, Frank Cooper, 
Richard Van Mattimore and Louise Dantzler? Never 
heard of them? Maybe not. Yet each and every 
one is a well-known star. Do you know what 
John Gilbert's own name is? And Gilbert Roland's? 
And Helen Kane's? You'll be amazed and amused 
when you learn some of Hollywood's real names 



Buster Keaton was christened Joseph and the family 
name was Francis when he was born in Muskegon, 
Michigan, but the late Houdini, seeing him tumble down 
a flight of stairs without injury and then get up laughing, 
exclaimed : "Holy smoke ! You're some Buster !" and 
the name has always stuck. Later, he changed the Francis 
to Keaton for screen purposes. 

Anita Paee's real name is 



Anita Pomares ; Mary 
Nolan's is Mary Imo- 
gene Robertson ; Madge 
Bellamy's is Margaret 
Philpotts, and Helen 
Kane's is Helen Schroe- 
der. Antonio Moreno 
merely dropped the mid- 
dle portion of his full 
name of Antonio Gar- 
rido Monteagudo Mor- 
eno when he went into 
the movies. 



JTVELYN BRENT 
used to be just plain 
Betty Riggs ; and Mae 
Murray once possessed 
the name Marie Koenig. 
Very few of Paul Muni's friends know that his name 
was once upon a time Muni Weisenfreund. Jack Oakie's 
real name of Jack Offield is likewise rather a dark secret 
to many. Joan Crawford used to write her signature 
"Lucille La Sueur," and Dolores Del Rio's friends back 
in Mexico know her as Lolita Dolores Asunsolo de 
Martinez. Rex Bell's true name is George Belden. 

When Irene Rich was a Buffalo society girl her name 
was Irene Luther, while Betty Compson left the name 
of Lucime Compson behind her when she sought a 
screen career. (Continued on page 114) 



witness these luminaries whose names are not their own 



47 




ALICE 

This fa mous au- 
thor tells, among 
other fascinating 
things about this 
stunning actress, 
the secret of Alice 
Joyce's eternal 
youth 




4£ • A 'S 



Miss Joyce as she appeared in "Song O' My Heart," 
John McCormack's starring picture. This was 
one of the season's most important pictures. 



SHE has a quality which makes her an amazing 
jaaradox. Alice Joyce is a product of the movies — - 
of Hollywood — and she is a lady! 

I'm sure there must be other ladies in Holly- 
wood. Unfortunately, I have met few of them. I have 
met delightful gamins, charming schemers, amusing gold 
diggers, amazing exhibitionists, interesting psychopathic 
cases that would delight my friends, Dr. Smith Ely 
Jelliffe and Dr. A. A. Brill. But these fascinating girls, 
after you have seen them do their tricks and have heard 
them talk constantly about their own little world, in which 
they are God and chief votary, rather pall. Alice Joyce 
is a human, understanding and understandable person. 
She seems to me to be unusually free from neuroses and 
delusions. She looks at life calmly, with mild amuse- 
ment, with a nice sense of balance. She is a delightful 
companion. I like to think that she is my friend. 

When I told Alice Joyce I wanted to do a story about 
her she smiled with an uplifted eyebrow. We had talked 
over a hundred small topics of the day. I had been 
amused and interested at her colorful view of life. 

She and her younger daughter, little Peggy Regan, 
going on nine, had come out for a swim and for tea. I 
looked at Alice at ease in one of the low wicker chairs in 
my sun room. I knew she had been in the movies since 
the old Biograph days and yet, a sort of miracle, there is 

48 



Here's an old pic- 
ture of Alice as she 
looked in the good 
old Vitagraph days. 
This was before 
she was "The 
Kalem Girl." 



^ . j • 

is v 



about her the same youthfulness that there is about Peggy. 
Her hazel eyes are wide apart, beautifully spaced. Her 
brown hair is bobbed but it isn't one of the long, mussed- 
looking bobs that so many Hollywood stars think neces- 
sary for their "parts," nor is it one of the close-cropped, 
bizarre effects or the shaving-like curls other screen 
actresses have achieved. Usually it is rather straight and 
Alice has a distracting way of pushing her hat back with 
a gesture that would make any one else look hideous, but 
which succeeds in making her look naive and young. For- 
that matter, the line under her chin still has the softness of 
youth — the fullness which disappears under too many 
massages and is always gone after a face lift or a "restora- 
tion" which women resort to in vain clutchings for youth. 
Alice Joyce's face is pale and she uses no make-up except 
vivid scarlet lip rouge — you know her mouth's sensuous 



in A LOOKING GLASS 



quality. She is restless, always, underneath. And out- 
wardly she has the lovely calm of a person whom nothing 
seems to disturb. 

HOW did you get started?" I asked. And waited to 
hear one of those usual, romantic stories that stars 
tell about grand old ancestral homes and money losses. 

"I left school at fourteen," she said. "I'm glad of one 
thing. My daughters can have a better education than I 
had — I can do things for them. 

"I got a job as a telephone operator. Gramercy Ex- 
change. I went from there to the old Hotel Oxford. And 
made thirty dollars a month working twelve hours a day 
and only had one day off a month. After work I went 
home to the Bronx — my stepfather could have a house with 



Alice Joyce is a 
human, under- 
standing and un- 
derstandable 
person. So says 
the brilliant author 
of this article. 




By THYRA SAAATER 
WINSLOW 



graph — got a job. D. W. Griffith was directing. She 
was in pictures with Mary Pickford and Arthur Johnson 
and Willette Kershaw. And she did get ten dollars a clay ! 
When she worked. 

But there were too many days when even a lovely, slim 
extra girl wasn't needed. Alice went back to posing. If 
you weren't at the studio when an artist wanted you, he 
got another model. 

She grew restless. She wanted more than posing. She 
rehearsed with Lew Fields in "The Summer Widowers." 
That was fun ! Then she was late. The director's tem- 
per was uncertain. She was fired ! Three weeks of re- 
hearsals gone for nothing"! 

She got a job posing for song slides. A man with whom 
she posed went into pictures. His company was having 
trouble finding a girl who could ride. Alice had been on 
a horse, once, on a farm. 

"I can ride!" she said. 

She fell off the horse, was bruised black and blue. But 
she made ten dollars. And the riding got her a regular job. 



room enough for his dogs there.'' 
Even that job didn't last. Alice 

was laid off. Then, at a dance, an 

artist asked her to pose. 
."That was better." She smiled 

reminiscently. "Five dollars a day 

— and I could stop at five o'clock. 

Even now 1 think a good director is 

one who stops sharp at five." 

It was interesting, posing. She 

was sixteen, now. She posed for 

Coles Phillips, C. D. Williams, 

Orson Lowell. 

A GIRL told Alice about the old 
Biograph Company. You could 
make ten dollars a day and extra 
for overtime. Alice went to Bio- 




Before Alice went into the 
movies she was first a telephone 
operator and then an artist's 
model. She knows only too 
well what hard work is. 




49 



'1 don't believe Alice Joyce ever gave a wild party in her life/' 



Kalem made her an offer and asked what salary she 
wanted. Friends said "Don't be cheap !" She knew that 
Gene Gautier got thirty-five dollars a week for writing 
and acting. Alice; trembling a little, asked for fifty dol- 
lars. 



And got it ! 



And then California and 




Alice as she appeared in "The Ven- 
geance of Durand," which was made 
on the old Vitagraph lot. 



FIFTY dollars every week ! 
seventy-five! And there 
never was a nickel left over. 
Funny, as you make more 
money, your expenses seem to 
go up ! For a year and a half 
Alice did Indian and Western 
pictures. "The Engineer's 
Sweetheart !" Then came 
recognition. 

Of all her pictures Alice 
Joyce likes best "Stella Dal- 
las," "The Little French Girl," 
and the picture which she fin- 
ished only last April, "He 
Knew Women." This was 
adapted from The Theatre 
Guild's success, "The Second 
Man" and she played opposite 
Lowell Sherman. She did not 
like as well "Song O' My 
Heart" with McCormack. Last 
year she was especially pleased 
because George Arliss chose 
her for the second time to play in "The Green Goddess." 
And the day I am writing this she is completing her plans 
to go to California for a new picture. 

I don't believe Alice Joyce ever gave a wild party in 
her life. She doesn't like them. She has a charmingly 
appointed apartment in New York, a beach bungalow in 
Hollywood. She keeps her servants for years and they 
adore her. She is interested in the things that interest 
other civilized people. She has no weird fads. Her 
clothes are conservative. In spite of a lot of rumors that 
all stars must contend with, I believe she is in love 
with Jack Regan, her own husband. She treats him 
with the amused and tolerant air that a woman learns 
to take towards a husband after years of marriage, 
especially if the husband is Irish and a bit prone to 
jealousy and is humorous and fond. She was mar- 
ried, once before, to Tom Moore. They are still 
good friends. 

"This business of staying together for the children's 
sake is all nonsense," she said. "Children are less happy 
in a home without harmony than with one parent in a 
pleasant home." 

ALICE has two children. Wisely, she has kept them 
l away from public life. Young Alice Moore is 
calm-eyed, dignified, altogether charming. Little Peggy 
Regan is about the nicest child I know. She is 
gay, generous, frank, without a trace of self-con- 
sciousness, delighted with the simplest pleasures, good 
company. 

An interview isn't complete without "favorities." I 
found that A. E. Matthews is Alice Joyce's favorite actor. 
Jane Cowl and Mrs. Fiske her favorite actresses. Brown 
is her favorite color. Her favorite author is Somerset 
Maugham — he gave her three of his autographed books. 
She likes "The Moon and Sixpence" best of all. She en- 
joys a good mvstery story and just finished Edgar Wal- 
lace's "Red Circle." 

She prefers living in New York — is a city person — - 
doesn't like the country a great deal. She likes England, 

50 



too. And China Hong Kong still holds romance. 

I asked her who she would rather be if she weren't 
herself. 

"Any nice little girl of eight to eleven," she said. 
"Any little girl, now, that is. Children seem to have 
better times these days than they did when I was a 
youngster." 



SHE is not a demanding mother. She wants 
her daughters to be individuals — to get 
what they want most out of life. If they want 
to go on the stage or in the movies she will 
help them all she can, though she thinks the 
work is hard. Alice, at fourteen, has already 
shown a talent for writing — is on the school 
paper. Peggy is too busy being happy to think 
about careers. 

Nor is an interview with an actress complete 
without beauty secrets. Alice Joyce still looks 
younger than most of the new stars. And she 
doesn't seem to have any secrets at all ! She 
hardly ever takes time for a massage. She 
uses cold cream when she thinks of it, which 
isn't often. Her life is that of hundreds of 
other sophisticated New York women. She 
likes good things to eat, an occasional drink, 
little parties, the theatre. 

At eight she has coffee, usually with hot 
milk. Or hot water and lemon juice. When 
she feels the need of it she takes bending exer- 
which suffice to keep her in trim. 



cises, 



H 



ER favorite luncheon dish is a 
Sometimes she has a poached egg on spinach or a 
baked potato and buttermilk and White Rock. She never 
takes "snacks" during the day. Tea is at five, a social 
hour, and Alice usually has only a nibble of a sandwich. 
Her dinner is simple; soup, meat, green vegetables, a 
salad, crackers, cheese, coffee. No sweets — though she 
likes candy and perhaps, once a month, goes on a "candy 
bat," and devours a whole box of fudge. 

Alice Joyce is five feet five and three-quarter inches in 
height and she weighs one hundred and twenty-two 
pounds. She has a very simple way of losing. 

"On my way to Hollywood I live on buttermilk. I'm 
never much overweight. When I get there I usually find 
I've reduced enough 
playing with a tall man 

No sensation — no lurid past or crimson future. A 
little telephone girl who became a gracious and lovely 
lady. If that can happen, maybe, after all, there's some- 
thing pretty fine about the movies. 



steak sandwich. 



I can weigh a little more when I'm 



THYRA SAMTER WINSLOW'S 

intimate knowlege of and long ac- 
quaintance with stars of the screen will 
be revealed in another charming story 
by her in the next issue of the 
MODERN SCREEN Magazine. 
Watch for it! 



HOLLYWOOD 

AFTER DARK 




A fascinating word-picture of the 
film city at night 

By EDWIN ANTHONY 

■ * 

THERE is a lot goes on in Hollywood once the 
copyrighted California sunshine drops into the 
Pacific. It's just a question of finding out where 
and when. And then, how to get there. 
This is no Cook's Tour of the cinema city ; neither is 
it an expose of wickedness or wassail. There are, no 
doubt, a few such places in Hollywood. As somebody 
must have remarked before (in fact, they have, because I 



have read it myself), Hollywood is no better and no 
worse than any other city of its size in this country. It 
has its good places and its places not so good. I am not 
going to tell you about the latter for two reasons. The 
first being that no one told me about them — I had to find 
out for myself — and the second is that I can not remem- 
ber much about them even when I try. But to get back 
to Hollywood after dark, that is there for all of us to 
enjoy to the specified limits of our capacity. 



Here is Hollywood Boulevard, with Crauman's 
Chinese Theater in the foreground, on the night of 
an opening in the lavish Hollywood manner. 




51 



A world famous street at night — Hollywood Boulevard 




Here we are on the Boulevard 
just below Vine Street. The 
luxurious new Pantages theater 
on the right is a sight for pleasure- 
seeking night owls. 



Below is another portion of 
that famous Boulevard. It 
shows the Warner theater. 
The opening nights that take 
place here rival Sid Crau- 
man's shows. 



The big nights in Hollywood 
are, of course, the world prem- 
ieres of pictures made right in its 
own back yard, with its own re- 
spectable, tax-paying citizens play- 
ing the parts. For some reason, 
unexplainable by any one, there is 
no place in the world that becomes 
so excited at the sight of a movie 
star in person as Hollywood. It 
may be a paradox, but it is the truth. 

When a premiere is staged at 
Grauman's Chinese Theater, the 
Carthay Circle or Warner's, the 
crowd begins to gather around the 
roped -off area hours before Laura 
La Plante, Dorothy Mackaill, Skeets 
Gallagher, Buddy Rogers and other 
celebrities of the moment descend 
from shiny limousines to shout some- 
thing unintelligible into the micro- 
phone and dart into the theater. And 
are all those thousands of morbidly 
curious onlookers visitors from the East 
and Middle West ? Don't be sil' ; most 
of them are natives who work in banks, 
clothing stores, soft drink parlors and 
possibly not a few of them actually are 
employed in the film studios. You may 
notice I call them natives. I say it with reservations. 
There is no ^uch thing as an actual native of Hollywood. 
What 1 really mean is that they are people who have 
lived there at least six months. 

( )f course they don't have openings every night in 
! lolly wood. Where do the crowds go and what do they 
do on other nights? I am taking it for granted that 
everyone goes out every night — and I have my reasons. 




ONE of the best spots is the Pom Pom Cafe. The 
Pom Pom is located half way between Beverly Hills 
and Hollywood, Managed by a heavy-set, happily mar- 
ried man who matriculated as headwaiter in a bachelor 
grill in which women were not even admitted, the Pom 
Pom boasts the best "girl show" in town. ft is best 
because it is the only one in that entire district, but never- 
theless, it is a good one. The girls are as young and as 



52 



Hollywood night life is not complete without an opening 



pretty as you could find in an Earl Carroll 
revue and if they are not as well trained 
it is because the show changes more often. 

The motion picture fraternity is always 
well represented at the Pom Pom. Between 
eleven and two in the morning you might 
see Grant Withers with his pretty wife, 
Loretta Young ; Carl Laemmle, Jr., with a 
party ; Eddie Lowe, Lilyan Tashman and 
any number of others. 

Wilson Mizner's Brown Derby is an- 
other well known rendezvous of picture folk. 
The Brown Derby is located on Vine Street, 
just off Hollywood Boulevard. Thing-a-ma- 
jigs that look like brown Derbys (and may- 
be are, for all I know) hang from the ceil- 
ing and give poetic license for - the name. 
The Derby is attractive to the eye, but even 
more so to the palate. Mizner is a noted 
Broadway wit "gone Hollywood." He main- 
tains he learned the value of good food for 
the actor when he was starving to death, 
trying to be one himself. He features no 
entertainment, but the place is always filled 
with persons whose faces, forms, likes, dis- 
likes and press-agented hobbies are known 




This group of four 
pictures was all 
taken at the open- 
ing of "Dixiana 
Here we have 
Estelle Taylor. 



This is the famous Carthay Circle, another of 
the theaters where those super-elaborate Holly- 
wood premieres happen. 




Ben Lyon and his wife, Bebe 
Daniels, take a bow. 



Betty Compson and Hugh 
Trevor, who are often seen 
together. 



Cute Dorothy Lee, of Radio 
pictures, says a few words. 



53 



Here are some restaurants whither they go after theater 



Here's the inside of the 
Brown Derby. There's 
no dancing here but 
you can be sure of get- 
ting a good meal and 
also of the chance of 
seeing a star or two. 
Much studio gossip is 
exchanged over these 
tables between bites. 




throughout the world by all who run and read. 

ON Hollywood Boulevard itself are Henry's 
and the Montmartre. Both of these es- 
tablishments have figured in columns of news- 
paper publicity and in virtually every book of 
fiction to come out of the studio city. Henry's 
makes no pretense of being anything except a 
good restaurant. It doesn't have to. Henry, 
the owner, has appeared in every picture made 
by Charles Spencer Chaplin. Legend has it 
that the great Chaplin is himself a part owner 
and this is partially borne out by the fact that 
Henry's is the only place the comedian has 
ever been seen by the general public while 
toving with an oyster- fork. 

The Montmartre is more swanky. It boasts 
a world-famous orchestra and a cover 
charge. There is a weekly dance contest with 
prizes awarded by the most celebrated of movie 
stars. The Wednesday luncheons at this place 
are quite the thing. It is tradition for as many 



Above we have the ex- 
terior of the Montmartre. 
This is perhaps one of the 
most high-hat places in the 
town. They make a spe- 
cialty of dancing contests. 



This is Henry's in which 
Charlie Chaplin is rumored 
to have an interest. Those 
shadowy figures are not 
ghosts— they're the effect 
made by the nocturna 
time exposure. 



54 



And here are some general 



doings when the 



sun has set 




This is the ticket office 
of the American Legion 
Stadium where the 
weekly prize-fights are 
held. They are a great 
attraction to the movie 
crowd. Yes, that's Harry 
Green, Paramount 
comedian, right bang 
up in the front, there. 



feminine luminaries as possible to crowd in on 
that day. 

About a year ago the Embassy Club was 
opened in the heart of Hollywood and rapidly 
became one of the outstanding resorts of the 
colony. The only drawback is that you must be 
a member to get in. Once inside, however, you 
will more than likely run across such personages 
as Dick Barthelmess, William Powell, Marion 
Davies, Marian Nixon, BilMe Dove, Howard 

Hughes, Glenn Tryon, Ronald Colman but 

why go on? 




Doug and Joan made a 
midnight appearance 
when Joan imprinted her 
foot in the famous cement 
in the court of Grauman's 
ChineseTheater recently. 



William Collier, Jr., gave 
a stag party recently. See 
if you can find him and 
also Buster Keaton, Nor- 
man Kerry, William 
Haines, Jack Pickford, 
Skeet Gallagher and Ben 
Lyon (who fell asleep). 



55 




56 




LUCKY THI 



Kay Francis believes in 
this number— and you 
can't blame her, for it 
has played a big part in 
her meteoric career 

By HERBERT CRUIKSHANK 



LOOK at her again. The girl on the cover. The 
perfect oval of her face. The fathomless sea- 
igtey eyes. Those provocative lips, with their 
prompt .suggestion of the Mona Lisa. The keen, 
clean-cut contours of her figure. The poise. That 
truly regal hearing. Now close your eyes. Can't you 
see her as — 

\ dainty, languorous, drawling daughter of the old 
South — the final perfect bloom evolved from a family 
tree deep-rooted in aristocracy through countless gen- 
erations. Chivalry duelling for her favors . . . the 
scent of magnolia ... a background of trysting-trees 
veiling romantic meetings with festooned Spanish moss. 

Or imagine her the unattainable darling of a dozen 
daring D'Artagnans. Gallants bending in adoration 
over slender finger-tips . . . slender blades flashing to 
whatever cause she lists. 

I'crhaps a princess persecuted . . '. a queen deposed 
by an envious rabble . . . the last of a mighty dynasty 
. . the scion of some ancient house tossed to the arms 




MODERN SCREEN has the honor of pre- 
senting this rare old portrait of Kathenne 
Clinton, Kay Francis' mother. She was well 
known as a repertory theater actress of con- 
>iderable merit. 




The lovely Kay is here 
caught in a decidedly 
unusual pose— for her. 
This girl possesses the 
species of charm which 
enters into and dom- 
inates everything she 
ever does and ever will 
do. 




A scene from her 
picture: Kay Francis 
Kenneth McKenna in 
Virtuous Sin." 



newest 
and 



The 



of Hollywood on the turbulent foam 
of the post-war maelstrom . . . ruler of 
destinies . . . mistress of men . . . 
maker — and breaker — of empires. 

In whatever vivid pigment your im- 
agination paints her, Kay Francis 
looks the part. Obviously the ages 
have labored long to produce her per- 
fection. Obviously, too, it was created 
to grace high places. Yet, as some- 
times happens, fate, in a final moment 
of carelessness thwarted its own ends. 
For instead of being born in the palace 
of some royal line, Kay Francis made 
her mundane debut in Oklahoma City. 
Yes, it was Friday, the thirteenth. 



YET she has a certain heritage. 
There was something of feudal 
holdness in the wanderings of old 
Grandfather Franks through the western wilderness. He 
wasn't always old, and in his youth the boom-towns of 
the frontier were his familiar habitat. He married twice, 
and of the second wedding in his house was born a daugh- 
ter, Katherine, who became Kay Francis' mother. 

With real romance dying, the girl turned to the world 
of make-believe for her adventuring, and as Katherine 
Clinton, gained some measure of fame as a player of parts 



in repertoire companies. Thirteen months after her mar- 
riage, a daughter, Katherine, came. The infant travelled 
through the West — California, Colorado — as the parents 
followed their nomadic life. 

Still a very little girl, the young actress-mother put the 
child in school in the East, and from that time the future 
Kay Francis spent a dozen years in the convents of the 
Holy Angels at Fort Lee, New Jersey — Notre Dame, at 
Roxbury, Massachusetts — and the Holy Child Jesus, in 
New York City. xAiter these preliminaries she was "fin- 
ished" at Miss Fuller's School, at Ossining, and in the 
Cathedral School at Garden City. 

ONE of her earliest recollections of the theatre dates 
back to a memorable evening, when, at the age of 
three, she sat in a box with a family friend, while her 
mother, then leading lady for the Daly Repertoire Com- 
pany, enacted a tragic role upon the stage. 

"Mother had to be shot just before the third act cur- 
tain," reminisces the latest cinema sensation, "and when 
the big scene came, the audience was properly keyed up 
for it. The shot was fired. Mother cried out tragically. 
She staggered and fell while the slayer watched horrified 
at his deed, and the audience gripped its chair-arms. 

"The atmosphere was stifling with silence and tenseness. 
Then I turned to the friend who was 'minding' me, 
and piped up, 'don't be frightened — mother's not really 
dead — she's only acting!' 

"My childish voice car- 
ried everywhere in the 
theatre. The audience be- 
came hysterical with laugh- 
ter. They had to ring down 
the curtain. The part I re- 
member best is the spanking 
I received in the dressing- 
room. After that episode I 
saw mother's portrayals 
from the wings — not from 
out front." 

"Kay," for so they called 
her, made her own bow in 
the theater not as a player, 
but as a playwright. With 
another Katherine — Stewart 
by name — she composed the 
class play at the Cathedral 
School. It was presented in 
1921 — and Kay was sixteen 
at the time. 

BUT, almost literally 
born in the theater, it 
was not surprising that the 
youngster wished to follow 
in her mother's footsteps. 
A life of one-night stands 
had destroyed much of the 
elder woman's illusions re- 
garding the stage as a ca- 
reer, and her objections to 
starting her daughter along 
that thorny path resulted in 
the abandonment of the 
theatrical ambition in favor 
of a New York business- 
school course in stenography and typing. But the curly- 
ques of shorthand, and the unromantic repetition of "now 
is the time for all good men to come to the aid of the 
party" on one of Mr. Underwood's machines didn't quite 
fit in with Kay's ideas of life. 

In a final effort to keep her from the stage, the girl 
was sent abroad for an eight month's tour of the isles 
and the continent. When, upon (Continued on page 105) 




Kay Francis' dark beauty is a 
welcome relief from Holly- 
wood's eternal parade of 
clinging blondes. 



58 



Malibu Beach, Noah Beery's 
Trout Ranch, Wrigley's Cat- 
aiina Island, Agua Caliente 
and Palm Springs are the 
boundaries of the state of 
mind called Hollywood. 



Its tremendous pos- 
sibilities, its amazing 
variety, its never- 
changing friendli- 
ness—these are 
some of the reasons 
why— 

WE 
LIKE 




HOLLYWOOD 



HOLLYWOOD is a trick 
town. We like it. 
\nyone who doesn't like 
Hollywood would refuse a 
free ticket to see a bobbed-haired 
Lady Godiva take a canter. 

Hollywood — and, by the way, 
there is no such town — offers more 
residential advantages and fewer 

objectionable features than any place the two earnest 
young authors of this article have encountered between 
Canada and Panama. 

Civically, we repeat, there is no such place at all. 
Hollywood is a state of mind. < hit on the Pacific Coast 
there is a thriving metropolis called Los Angeles, with 
more than a million and a quarter population, an enor- 
mous amount of civic pride, and a rankling sorrow be- 
cause the last census did not place it ahead of Detroit. 

In the midst of that community is the mythical section 
called Hollywood, which is chiefly famous because most 
of the studios and film stars have moved out of it to 
bigger and better quarters. 



By CARROLL and 

GARRETT GRAHAM 

Illustrated by Walter Van Arsdale 



Hollywood itself has become 
Hollywood because of its manner 
of living and its expansive attitude 
toward life. 

Within five minutes from any 
given point on Hollywood Boule- 
vard one may easily discover 
schools, churches, symphony con- 
certs, sympathetic blondes or psy- 
choanalysts. It's all a matter of personal taste. 1 lolly- 
wood is at once a three-ring circus, a summer and winter 
resort, a beautiful section of a big city, a gathering place 
tor nuts from all over the world, a center of culture and 
learning, and a great spot lor whoopee and diversion. 
Briefly, Hollywood is a swell place to live. 

From the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Vine 
Street — now the principal corner of town — one may ar- 
rive in ten minutes at the Hollywood Bowl, the Studio 
Club, Griffith Park, Poverty Row. Henry's, the Chinese 
Theater, Lucey's speakeasy, the Hollywood police station, 
the gas tank on Santa Monica Boulevard, the Mulholland 
Dam or a three day party up in Holly woodland. 



60 



In spite of their famous and devastating book, "Queer People/' the authors 
herein disprove the theory that they have no use for the film capital 



Patches of Hollywood may be found almost anywhere 
within a radius of twenty miles of that intersection. The 
mythical boundaries of this far-famed community are as 
elastic as Leon Errol's legs. 

These boundaries embrace the Rancho Malibu, some 
miles up the Santa Monica coast, where film stars have 
their palatial summer homes and private bathing beaches, 
with or without the formality of suits, and they extend 
as far south as the gambling casino at Agua Caliente, 
where Hollywood flies for a weekend — and generally 
walks home. 

The same boundaries reach down to the desert at Palm 
Springs, where film folk go to lose that tired feeling, 
or to Noah Beery's trout ranch in the mountains. Occa- 
sionally Hollywood even extends to Catalina Island where 
the stars park their yachts and chew gum 
with William Wrigley. 

THERE are a number of advantages of 
living in Hollywood not listed by the 
Chamber of Commerce. To wit : 

Golf links are so numerous that many 
undesirable peo- 
ple are kept off 
the street. 

Even the 
minor studio po- 
sitions pay well 
enough so that 
almost everyone 
can make pay- 
ments on — if not 
own — his private 
car. 

A studio car- 
penter, faring 
forth in the 
morning, may 
pick a rose in 
his own garden 
and wear a bou- 
tonierre to work. 

The high cost 
of liquor, and 
the low cost of 
gasoline counter- 
balance each 
other, both be- 
ing consumed in 
a bo u t equal 
quantities, and, 
too frequently, 
together. 

A man may 
appear in public 
at any hour of 
the day or night 
in a bathing suit, 
plus fours or an 
opera hat — or in 
comment. 

There are so many miles of bathing beach that even 
the ocean water is fit to drink and one may find a place 
on the sand without landing in the lap of an alien. 

Restaurant keepers will take checks. 

The nights are so warm and pleasant that it is no 
great hardship to sleep in the park if one is out of work. 

California earthquakes always occur farther north. 

Love is regarded as a pleasant pastime rather than a 



gainful occupation, which, to us, seems civilized. 

When it rains, the precipitation is an excellent bever- 
age, generally coming in three flavors. 

Hollywood is so crammed with beauty that gentlemen 
musit deter blondes. 

It is a town without tenements, elevated trains, night 
clubs or a criminal element. When you go out in public 
you are sure you are not rubbing elbows with a gunman, 
and you get used to actors eventually. 

There is hardly such a thing as an "unfashionable dis- 
trict" or a "bad ad- 
dress" in Hollywood, 
unless it happens to 
be next door to a sax- 
ophone. 

YOU can live any 
way you please 
and nobody bothers 
about your private 
life if you keep it pri- 
vate. Conrad Nagel 




In Hollywood a 
man may appear 
in public in plus 
fours, a bathing 
suit and an opera 
hat without ex- 
citing comment. 



all three — without exciting derisory 



ushers every Sunday in 
the Christian Science 
church. Thai's his busi- 
ness. Another star drinks 
a pint of cognac every 
morning before he can 
f arise. That's his business. 

There are more interest- 
ing and unusual people there than in any 
other spot the world over. ' . 

Stroll down Hollywood Boulevard and 
you will bump into Hindu princes, film 
stars, wise-crackers, poets, prize-fighters, evangelists, au- 
thors, extra girls, portrait painters, wood-carvers, opera 
singers and assorted celebrities and nuts. 

In what other town may one find so varied an assort- 
ment of personages as Aimee Semple McPherson, Jack 
Dempsey, Charlie Chaplin, Sadakichi Hartmann, Oscar 
Strauss, Jim Tully, Peter the Hermit, Sam Goldwyn, 
Mickey Walker, John Barrymore, Alfred Hertz, Fay 
Lanphier, William Randolph Hearst, Wilson Mizner, Ru- 
pert Hughes, D. W. Griffith, Broken Nose Murphy, Sid 



61 



"Briefly, Hollywood is a swell place to live/' 



Orauman, George Kotsonaros, Jack Cudahy, Flo Ziegfeld, 
One-Eyed Connelly, Ben Hecht, Prince Youcca Troubetz- 
koy, Ace Hudkins, William Gibbs McAdoq, Bull Mon- 
tana, De Sylva, Brown and Henderson, Nick the Greek, 
and probably the man who hit Billy Patterson? 

THERE are a good many others whose names you 
probably do not know, but they are worthy* of men- 
tion. There is "Pardner" Jones, who shoots apple's off 
folks' heads, and has never nicked a temple yet; there is 
the man who makes his living renting a trained goose to 
the movies ; there is Dario, the numerologist; some of 
whose film followers are so faithful that they won't start 
a picture until he approves of the date; there is Dick 
Grace, who cracks up airplanes for a living, and who once 
broke his neck in a stunt, then went back and did the 
stunt over again when he had recovered ; there is the man 
who so resembles Eincoln that someone once said he'd 
never be happy until he was assassinated ; there are so 
many others so unusual, or weird, or infamous or interest- 
ing that they cannot be listed, or even remembered. 

HOLLYWOODIANS often gnash their teeth and 
wail that they want to get away from it all. They 
pray that some fire bug will go about firing all the 
studios, or that all studio executives will be boiled in 
oil. They moan that Hollywood is the most impossible, 
the most artificial, the most objectionable spot in the world. 

They don't mean it. Very few people who have ever 
lived in Hollywood stay away from it for any great length 
of time. Occasionally some of them try, but they always 
come back. 

AND here are some of the reasons why they come back. 
. There is the Hollywood Bowl, where a magnificent 
symphony orchestra plays during the summer in a natural 
outdoor amphitheater, to an audience of 30,000. 

There are downtown theaters where competent actors 
play the Broadway hits and avoid the Broadway flops. 

There are even a few museums and art galleries, too; 
for instance, the Huntington Museum, including, as it 
does, priceless treasures of history and paintings of the 
masters, for which the founder expended enough millions 
to have bought control of almost any film company, but 
was too smart to do it. 




There is every conceivable kind of outdoor sport. For 
those who still remain collegiate there are the titanic 
struggles each fall between the football teams of U. S. C, 
Stanford and the University of California, and the in- 
tersectional contests in which the western gridiron squads 
try patiently, year after year, to teach the East how the 
game should be played. 

BUT all these advantages are listed in any Chamber of 
Commerce pamphlet, which this is not. The climate 
and recreational possibilities of this section have been so 
widely and loudly heralded that, in many states, the shoot- 
ing at sight of a Southern California booster is regarded 
as a matter of public weal. 

It's the people that make a community. And it is the 
people of cinema-land that make Hollywood such a great 
place of residence. You don't have to like 'em all. No- 
body could. But no matter what your taste, you can find 
friends there to match it. If Noah had to fill up his ark 
again with samples of all modern animal life, he could 
finish the job in a day along Hollywood Boulevard. 

Consequently, no one ever need be without friends. 
There are those who wear the tallest of millinery and 
broaden their "a's" and social outlook with formal affairs 
that would make the snootiest Mayfair evening seem like 
a Limehouse night. There are those who regard eating 
and drinking more as a matter of personal pleasure than 
of public display, and who consequently prefer smaller 
groups. There are those who like to' sing in kitchens, who 
boast that their harmony and brew are both homemade. 

THERE are the gutter-rollers, the street-brawlers, and 
the perennial sophomores who cruise about at night, 
throwing rocks at streetlights and tipping over outhouses. 

There is also a vast gathering of sober, normal citizens 
who vote, raise children, pay taxes and keep the place 
going. 

You can always find your own kind of people there, 
or, tiring of those, you can find any other kind. Of 
course, as in any community, there is a sprinkling of 
human undesirables. But it has never been generally 
agreed as to just who these are. 

Every resident of Hollywood should get away occa- 
sionally, because there are other pleasant places in the 
world, too. But don't let anyone kid you about the town. 

The authors of ''Queer People" will 
continue to live in Hollywood as long 
as public sentiment permits. 



Look for "Queerer People/' 
another stimulating article 
about Hollywood, by the 
Graham Brothers— in the next 
issue of the MODERN SCREEN 
Magazine 



Anyone who doesn't like Holly- 
wood would refuse a free ticket to 
see a bobbed-haired Lady Godiva. 



62 



The 
MODERN 
SCREEN 



M 



agazine s 



GALLERY 

OF 
HONOR 




NANCY CARROLL 



—who celebrates her acting coming- 
of-age with the histrionic ability de- 
manded by her role in the forth- 
coming "Laughter." 



'hotograph by Herman Zerrenner 



63 



GEORGE ARLISS 



—who always appears in sin- 
cere films, such as"Old English," 
never once stooping to hokum 
(or the sake of popularity. 




t'hotograph tiy Hurrcll 



NORMA SHEARER 



—who graciously postponed 
her career at its very height 
for the splendid although un- 
profitable privilege of mother- 
hood. 



65 



Photograph by Ernest A. Bachrach 



RICHARD DIX 



—whose part in "Cimarron" 
proves his earnest desire to do 
really serious characterizations 
in preference to his long list 
of farces. 



66 



CHARLES FARRELL 



—who bravely throws aside 
his somewhat stereotyped 
movie-hero roles to appear as 
the realistic, earthy Liliom. 



Here Billie Dove is greeting you with the famous 
smile so well known to fans the world over. The 
camp is complete even to the gasoline lamp which 
is guaranteed not to explode when lighted. 



THE 
SPORTING 
THING 
TO DO 



We're not saying what sort of a shot Miss 
Dove is, for frankly, we don't know. But we 
do feel that this young lady would be quite 
capable of bringing down a couple of quail or 
what have you. 




And Billie Dove does it with a 
charming mixture of sports- 
manlike efficiency and delight- 
ful feminity 



We had no idea how 
delightfully attractive 
boots, breeches and a 
beret could be until we 
cast our near-sighted 
eyes on this shot of the 
Dove. And isn't that 
sweater cute? 




Yo ho for the old kerosene stove 
with its grease and odors and 
what all. But who cares when you 
have the green grass growing 
all around and you can get un- 
tainted air free? Certainly Billie 
doesn't object to a smelly old 
stove. 



"Gee, it was an awfully big one, as big 
as that," says Miss Dove. "But it 
got away." Whether Billie really 
went after that fish or not, you've 
got to admit she looks pretty cute 
in the outfit. 




ANN 
HARDING'S 
NEW HOME 



Mrs. Harry Bannister greets you on the 
intriguing little steps which lead into 
her dining-room. 






The living-room with its perfectly delight- 
ful fire-place. The stones of this fire- 
place, incidentally, are composed of rocks 
found on the site of the house. 



This gives you an impres- 
sive glimpse of the won- 
derful location the Bannister 
home boasts. You'll have 
to go into second when 
you climb that one. 



Here is the breath- 
taking view which 
Ann Harding can enjoy 
merely by looking 
out of her windows. 
Care for a swim 
the pool? 



in 




70 



This gracious star's hill-top 
house is one of the most 
comfortable as well as one 
of the most charming 
homes in all of Hollywood 






A glimpse of the tiled 
and railinged entrance 
hall. Simple almost to 
the point of austerity, 
it is a heart-warming 
and pleasing interlude 
between rooms. 



Here's the music room. 
That's a picture of one of 
Ann Harding's greatest 
admirers on the piano, her 
daughter, Jane. 



71 




Greetings to and from our old friend, Adolphe 
Menjou. When he and Paramount disagreed, 
Adolphe went to Europe and made a talkie 
there in French. His work in that film caused 
M-G-M to bring him back to Hollywood to 
act in the French versions of their talkies. 
Now they say he'll make one in English. 




72 




GARBO, 

THE ATHLETE 



In the days when 
the Great Carbo 
was not above pos- 
ing for "publeeci- 
tee." In fact when 
she was glad and 
anxious to do it. 



By 

WALTER RAMSEY 



THERE'S been a lot of talk lately . . . about Garbo 
... and how she WILL do this . . . and WONT 
do that . . . and how she gets away with it . . . 
but every time I hear about Garbo . . . refusing 
to see the press ... or declining to meet Coolidge . . . 
and even poo-pooing the Prince of Sweden ... it always 
makes me think ... of that time four years ago . . . when 
I saw Garbo . . . and talked with her . . . and learned 
to admire her. 

It was when she first landed in Hollywood . . . and no 
one thought of her ... as The Misunderstood Heart . . . 
or The Woman Who Walks Alone . . . and they were 
right . . . because she wasn't pretty ... or fascinating 
... or any of those things . . . that Hollywood finds 
AFTER fame ascends. 

As a matter of fact ... as I remember her . . . she was 
gawky . . . and ungraceful in her movements ... as she 
walked . . . and she didn't use make-up vividly . . . like 
Joan Crawford ... or discreetly . . . like Norma Shearer 
. . . and the flat heels she wore ... on her shoes . . . 
made her feet look longer. . . . and wider than they 
really were. 

And it's a laugh to think back . . . and remember the 
Garbo . . . who used to do so many things . . . and see so 
many people . . . back in the good old days . . . when 
she first came here . . '. and the funniest of all ... I 
guess . . . was the publicity department . . . where she 
used to hang out every day . . . and sometimes . . . she 
even got in the way of the boys who worked there . . . 
when they were very busy. 

And she used to love to pose ... in fashion pictures 
. . . and she was probably the one girl ... on the lot . . . 
who didn't look well in clothes . . . but anyway . . . she 
begged for the chance to pose . . . for the Sunday papers 
... or the monthly magazines ... in black slinky dresses 
... or maybe fur coats . . . and besides that . . . she 
always liked lots of jewelry . . . even paste jewelry 
. . . because it photographed like the real thing . . . and 
I remember . . . that she was {Continued on page 115) 



The first of a delightful series— 
"Little Impressions of Big 
People/' Herein, a startling 
angle on Greta Garbo 




The track suit which Greta glorified four 
years ago. She hated to wear it then 
just as much as she would hate to now. 
But she went through it gamely. 



73 



In one of the annual Wampas baby star selections, Loretta Young and Sally 
Blane were picked, while Polly Ann, the third Young sister, was eliminated. 
Loretta did her best to have Polly substituted for herself, but to no avail. 



Am I My Brother's 

Keeper? 

By JANE STEWART 




HERE was a day when every home in Hollywood 
boasted a copy of the Bible. 
That, however, was seventeen years ago, before 



the first movie studio had reared its head above the 
orange and lemon groves, and when the total population 
of the village numbered eight families. Unfortunately, 
times have changed' — and so have books — in Hollywood. 

But at one time or another during their travels through 
life, the majority of our talkie stars have learned some- 
thing about the contents of the Good Book. Maybe it 
was at a time when they were just ordinary kids back in 
Dubuque or Kankakee and trudged their way to Sunday 
School each Sabbath morning. 

For the Bible asks the question : 

"Am I my brother's keeper?" 

And Hollywood folks answer "yes" with actions rather 
than words — with good deeds rather than empty phrases. 



There are few celluloid notables who haven't given their 
kinfolk a goodly share of their fat pay envelopes. 

Take the case of little Sally O'Neil, who has depleted 
her bank account and more or less neglected her work 
for a year to wage the fight that saved her brother from 
a long term in the state penitentiary at San Quentin. 

The Hollywood apartment of Ted Lewis, wealthy 
vaudeville artist, was robbed of jewels and furs valued at 
more than $75,000. Three youths were arrested, one of 
them being Jack Noonan, brother of Sally and Molly 
O'Day. They were tried on charges of burglary. 

Sally engaged the best criminal lawyers and told them 
to spare no expense to free Jack. But a previous prison 
record was used against him and he was convicted with 
his alleged pals. The court imposed a seven-year sentence. 

Sally didn't let matters rest there. She had the case 
appealed on the ground that Jack was mentally ill. She 



The well known quotation from the Good Book brings forth a 
resounding "yes" from the big-hearted Hollywood film folk 

74 



It's amazing, the number of stars who are helping their kin 
along— and they're doing it on the quiet, not for effect 




paid for its upkeep. Then she adopted and has educated 
Lottie's eldest child, Mary Charlotte Pickford. 

One of the sweetest stories of sister-love I have heard 
in Studiotown dates back to January, 1929, when the 
Wampus made its annual selection of baby stars. 

Three sisters — Polly Ann Young, then twenty ; Sally 
Blane, then eighteen, and Loretta Young, then sixteen — 
were among the fifty or more nominees from whom the 
thirteen winners were to be selected. Sally and Loretta 
were picked ; Polly was eliminated. 

Before public announcement of the awards was made, 
Loretta appealed to the judges of the election. 

"Please leave me out and put Polly Ann on the list," 
she pleaded. "She's older than I am and she's been in 



pictures much longer." 



(Continued on page ) 



The moment Dorothy Jordan got 
her M-C-M contract, she sent her 
sister, Mary, to Scripps College for 
Women, at Pomona, California. 



won her point and he was sent to a sani- 
tarium for observation. Eventually, he 
was granted a new trial at which the 
charge was reduced to one of receiving 
stolen property. 

To this he pleaded guilty and escaped 
with one year in the county jail. 

In hard-earned cash, the affair cost 
Sally $35,000, to say nothing of the 
salary lost. 

^"ONE but Mary herself ever will 
know how much of her personal for- 
tune America's Sweetheart has showered 
on Jack and Lottie Pickford. 

Although both were making money in 
pictures for years, neither Jack nor Lottie 
ever held a thought of the future — of the 
time when they would be among the vast 
army of unemployed. They enjoyed life 
while the money rolled in, then found 
themselves dependent upon Mary. 

Jack's health failed several years ago, and today he 
is a mere shell of the handsome fellow theatre-goers 
once knew. It was Mary who purchased him a home 
and maintained it, who sent him to Europe to consult 
famed specialists, who gave him a weekly allowance 
until the death of their mother provided him with an 
income of a thousand dollars a month. 

Even then Mary's interest did not wane. When his 
health improved sufficiently, she made him an assistant 
director on the payroll of Mary Pickford Productions. 

Mary has done equally as much for Lottie, victim 
of two unhappy marriages, but now living apparently 
happy with her third husband, a Beverly Hills under- 
taker. For Lottie she also purchased a residence and 




Bebe Daniels' grandmother 
has been a member of Bebe's 
household ever since the 
star's two reel comedy days. 
Bebe adores her. 



Lillian Roth and her sister, 
Ann, when they were five 
and three and a vaudeville 
team. It was Lillian who 
got Ann in the movies, 
many years later. 




75 



HOLLYWOOD 
WARDROBES 



I* Fay Wray 



The first of a series in which the 
wardrobes of famous film folk 
will be laid out for you to peruse 
and enjoy-and profit by observing 




Fay feels rather satisfied, thank you, as she surveys the favorite: 
items in her Fall and early winter wardrobe. Lounging 
pajamas, nighties and those other affairs on the left. Ten new 
pairs of shoes on the floor. A wrap or two on the chair. 
Evening gowns and street frocks on hangers. And the pet 
evening dress, which has a bolero, on Miss Wray herself. 

76 



Photographs especially 
posed for the MODERN 
SCREEN Magazine 



An intimate glimpse of 
some of Miss Wray's 
loveliest clothes. She is 
wearing a three-quarter 
length ermine wrap which 
has widish sleeves and a 
slight flair at the low hip 
line. Trimmed in gold 
sequin, plain and printed 
chiffon evening frocks 
and a green crepe street 
suit are in the background. 




78 



The green crepe suit, fur- 
trimmed. (Green is very good 
this winter.) Note those dress- 
maker touches in the gathered 
fullness at the yolk line. Purse 
and shoes strike the contrasting 
note, as shoes and gloves and 
purses always should. 



The chaise longue is covered 
with lingerie. Male readers 
are probably covered with con- 
fusion. With the return of 
steam heat, Miss Wray puts 
away her tailored lounging pa- 
jamas and goes in for lace 
trimmed satin and pastel shades. 




It was somewhere around 1919 or so that Blanche 
Sweet was showing what the well-dressed woman 
would wear in a thrilling drayma called "The Hushed 
Hour." This charming photograph (and we beg to 
call your attention to the perfectly elegant frame) is 
taken from that production. 



80 




Below we 3 have no less a personage than 
Marie Dressier acting in a most undignified 
manner. If you look closely you will see 
that she is tickling the ribs of her boy-friend 
with her little foot. It's from a play called 
"Hotel Topsy Turvy" which delighted them 
in 1898, you'll have to believe us. 



Above we have— but surely you know them. 
But you don't if you belong to the famous younger 
generation. It's none other than Beverley Bayne 
and Francis X. Bushman, and the name of the piece 
was "A Million A Minute." We're afraid we 
can't discover the name of the person in the back- 
ground who is listening in so rudely. 




81 



The MODERN SCREEN 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN (United Artists) 

Somehow, one does not expect the well known story of 
Abraham Lincoln's life to make a picture which will hold 
the attention unfailingly. Yet, D. W. Griffith, the pioneer 
of artistic directing, has taken the Lincoln saga and made 
it into a talking film which is palatable and enjoyable to 
every taste and creed. True, many of the well known 
situations have been omitted. Perhaps this is just as well. 
One of the worst handicaps that the great D. W. was up 
against was the public's familiarity with the details and 
development of this biographical drama. 

Walter Huston as Lincoln seemed almost perfect; the 
other performances, although good, are dwarfed besides 
his. Understanding and delicacy mark the direction. 

MONTE CARLO (Paramount) 

Ernst Lubitch has produced another "The Love 
Parade" ; this time that subtle director of subtle situations 
works with an Englishman in the leading role. Jack 
Buchanan has been called "The Chevalier of England." 
But the man has a way about him which gives him the 
right to expect popularity without benefit or handicap of 
comparison. 

Jeanette MacDonald is again in the role of the tem- 
peramental continental beauty who harbors a struggle be- 
tween her passion and her pride. This lady breaks into 
frequent (and charming) song. In other words, Monte 
Carlo is an operetta. And, say we, very, very delightful are 
operettas when they are as well done as this one. 

MOBY DICK (Warner Brothers) 

Many words will be spoken about this film discussing 
its merits in comparison to the same story of the silent 
days. To this reviewer, however, it will mean little, since 
he never saw the silent version. Perhaps it's as well, for 
the talkie can be judged on its own valuation and not on 
a comparison. 

It's a good film. John Barrymore as Ahab gets every 
ounce possible out of the characterization without over- 
doing it. His scenes with Joan Bennett are particularly 
appealing. 

The whale scenes are excellent. The only criticism is 
that in one or two shots the whale looks like a submarine. 

COMMON CLAY (Fox) 

We're reviewing this picture because it is one of the suc- 
cesses of the season and we feel everybody ought to know 
something about it. It played four weeks at the Roxy in 
New York and that's enough recommendation for any 
picture. 

It's a simple tale — and certainly not new. Briefly, it's 
about the girl who is a servant in the rich man's house 
and the rich man's son who seduces her. Of course, there 
is the baby. 

But don't think it's the old stuff done in the old way. 
It isn't. Constance Bennett and Lewis Ayres have in- 
jected such human appeal into the characters that you for- 
get entirely about the plot. And the baby should get the 
usual number of oh's and ah's from the womenfolk in 
the audience. 

You will love it. Don't fail to see it. 




Here you are offered a most authoritative and helpful guide 



82 



Magazine REVIEWS 




THE BAD MAN (First National) 

Here's Walter Huston in a role far different from his 
Abraham Lincoln but every bit as good a characterization. 

He plays a Mexican bandit whose heart is not as black 
as his character. In fact he turns out to be a sort of 
Pollyanna bandit, doing good turns right and left like a 
boy scout on the rampage. 

There's plenty of the kind of fun that everybody likes 
in this film. And there's a love interest, too, with Dorothy 
Revier and James Rennie providing it. 

O. P. Heggie does very well in a part that seems easy 
but isn't. He plays Uncle Henry, the irritable relative of 
the hero. Sidney Blackmer of stage fame hereabouts does 
well as the mean, mean villian. 

HELL'S ANGELS (Caddo) 

You must have heard how much this cost and how long 
the millionaire entrepreneur and director, Howard 
Hughes, took to make it. The question immediately 
arises — was it worth it? 

As for the air scenes — yes. Decidedly, yes. You can't 
expect to see a more thrilling and breath-taking sequence 
than that in which a gigantic Zeppelin bursts through 
magnificent clouds, bombs London and does battle with a 
squadron of British planes, meeting its doom when a self- 
sacrificing flier heads his plane straight through the raider 
and sends it to flaming destruction. As for the story — 
no. But Ben Lyon and James Hal! do the best they can 
with the central roles. 

ROMANCE (M-G-M) 

Somehow, mere words are not colorful enough to ex- 
press the fascination which is Greta Garbo's. Just to' see 
her sweep across the screen and to hear her low voice 
holds one spellbound. 

And it is her personality which makes this old-fashioned 
story a thing of life and color, glamor and romance. Her 
marvelous presence dominates the story to the exclusion of 
all else. 

The scene where — because she loves him — she insists 
on telling her past to the man she loves, is a moment that 
will grip you and bring the tears to your eyes. 

Lewis Stone is splendid opposite La Garbo. Gavin Gor- 
don, a newcomer, tries hard in a difficult role. 

THE STORM (Universal) 

This made a swell play, a swell silent movie, and now a 
sweller talkie. 

You probably know the story — it's about the French 
Canadian gal, the big silent Northwoods he-man, and the 
bored city rounder who has gone to the open spaces to get 
away from it all. 

It's unnecessary to tell you that both the fellows fall for 
the girl — that's where the drama comes in. 

Lupe Velez plays the French Canadian gal, with the ex- 
pected tornado effect. Paul Cavanaugh does the bored 
city rounder effectively. 

The forest fire sequence is gripping, and owes much to 
the ability of the talkie to make sounds effective. 

And, incidentally, what haven't the talkies done for the 
Northwest drayma! We advise you to see this and find 
out. 



Concise and dependable criticisms of the best current films 



83 



Nobody wants to spend money on empty and dull evenings— 
the purpose of this department is to spare you that waste 



LET'S GO NATIVE (Paramount) 

This isn't the usual sort of comedy, it's just sort of 
cuckoo, if you know what we mean, and if you enjoy the 
sort of stuff that's cuckoo you'll enjoy this. 

First of all there's a cast that will make you rub your 
eyes. Jack Oakie, Kay Francis, Jeanette MacDonald, 
Skeet Gallagher, James Hall and William Austin are all 
in it. And is that Oakie boy funny? Is he? Well! 

The plot, what there is of it, is all about how they get 
shipwrecked on an island. Skeet Gallagher is king of the 
island with a swell Brooklyn accent. • 

And don't miss the duet that Oakie and Kay Francis 



sing toward the end of the show. 



It's grand. 



OLD ENGLISH (Warner Brothers) 

You mustn't go to this on an evening when you have 
your heart set on a great deal of action or many plot com- 
plications ; this picture is virtually a one man show — a 
magnificent one, at that — but one which should be wit- 
nessed patiently and reverently. 

High honors go to George Arliss in the role of the aged 
English business man who has been discovered in a ras- 
cally deal which he has manipulated for the sake of an 
illegitimate family and who, to outwit his enemy, gorges 
and drinks himself to death at a final banquet enjoyed in 
solitude. 

That performance is one of the outstanding histrionic 
achievements of recent years and for that the picture 
should certainly be seen. 



DOUGHBOYS (M-G-M) 

Buster Keaton's second talkie is much funnier than his 
first. If he keeps on at this rate, his third ought to be 
the wow of the century. 

You've guessed it's a war story from the title and you're 
right. Buster plays a dumb private whose dumbness is 
only exceeded by his dumbness. 

There are several sequences in it that will simply have 
you howling. One is where Buster lands in the German 
trenches and finds an old friend of his in the German 
army. The way they greet each other and their conversa- 
tion is a riot. The other is the epilogue and final fade- 
out. It's one of the best endings in months. 

Director Sedgwick plays a small part well. 



DIXIANA (RKO) 

Last year RKO put over a swell picture in "Rio Rita" 
with Bebe Daniels in the leading role. This year they are 
trying to duplicate it by making "Dixiana" with Bebe 
Daniels in the leading role, and Bert Wheeler and Robert 
Woolsey as the comedians. They, too, were in "Rio Rita." 

It's a story of the old South, and features crinolines and 
Southern charm, and, of course, the celebrated Southern 
chivalry. 

Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey wander in and out 
of the story in a delightfully casual fashion. Their spark- 
ling comedy is at least half the entertainment value of this 
picture. Bebe Daniels puts over some songs in her usual 
splendid style, and Everett Marshall, a newcomer to 
talkies, makes an appealing figure as the hero. 

84 




Marian and her husband, Edward Hillman, Hoot and his wife, 
Sally Eilers, and another guest at tea on the lawn. 



MARIAN GIVES A PARTY 



Marian Nixon invited Hoot Gibson to 
come over on his birthday. The pictures, 
specially taken by Stagg for The MODERN 
SCREEN Magazine, were snapped while 
the fun was at its height 




That's Marian, sitting on the diving-board, 
and that's Hoot, standing there on the right, 
and Edward Hillman, Marian's husband, is seated 
next to him. 



The birthday cake. Hoot must cut 
the first slice, because it's his birthday, 
and Sally must supervise, because 
she's Hoot's wife. 



85 




Jeanette Loff, Nordic, blonde and beautiful, shows you 
what to do about those short lengths around the ears. 
And if your hair, like hers, comes a bit past the shoul- 
ders, wear it soft and low. 



THEY'RE 
WEARING 

LONG 
TRESSES 



Again— those odd lengths about the face 
which break down the firmest resolutions to 
"go long hair." Edwina Booth curls hers softly 
down from the part. 



S6 



There never was anything more 
alluringly feminine than long hair. 
These charming studies prove 
this time-honored contention be- 
yond the shadow of a doubt 




Part your hair in the middle if 
your features are as piquant as 
those of Virginia Bruce. Place 
the first wave far from the part 
and do what you like with your 
back hair. However, none of 
those Spanish fan effects, please. 



They're wearing 
them long in more 
ways than one as 
you'll find out if you 
turn to the engaging 
pictures on the fol- 
lowing pages 





\ 




The so-called awkward length. 
But not if Jeanette MacDonald 
has anything to say about it. 1 
This lady knows that curly 
hair is easier to manage than 
straight hair. So bring on 
those curling irons— but don't 
have 'em too hot! 



Ann Harding refuses either 
to cut or curl. We don't 
blame her— nor you, either, in 
spite of that terrific hat prob- 
lem, if your hair is very long, 
very plentiful and very silky. 
Just knot it gracefully as low 
on your neck as your hats will 
permit. 



87 



And despite all 



threats to the contrary 




SPECIAL PHOTOGRAPHS ON THESE 
TWO PACES BY OTTO DYAR 




Just the sort of a 
wrap to wear with 
a Kate Creenaway 
dress. It is of rose 
satin and has elbow 
sleeves, trimmed 
with black fur. 
Quaint? But the 
shoulder scarves add 
a 1930 touch to an 
I860 costume. 



What could suit 
Mary Brian's sweet 
simplicity better 
than a Kate Green- 
away frock of soft 
pink satin? This 
is a lovely mode 
for the young girl, 
with its dainty 
puffed sleeves, 
decolletage ruffle 
and full, gathered 
skirt. 





Flesh pink souffle and black lace— the black lace at 
the hem stiffened to give that bell-shaped silhouette. 
This dinner costume of Mary Brian's solves the prob- 
lem of being charmingly simple and unusual at the 
same time. Rows of tiny tucks, unevenly spaced, give 
that "made all by hand" look. 



88 



THEY'RE STILL WEARING 
^ LONG DRESSES 




I 



I 



It looks simple, 
but the cut is in- 
tricate. Harry 
Collins, one of the 
fashion experts of 
Hollywood, de- 
signed this pale 
blue crepe eve- 
ning gown for Miss 
Collyer. Circles 
of gold are em- 
broidered all over. 
The same kind of 
embroidery, in a 
solid band, forms 
girdle and shoul- 
der straps. 





Sophistication with ruffles. The color is gray chiffon. 
The top of the bodice is lace. The shoulder ruffle 
ends in a ridiculous scarf. The skirt is in many sec- 
tions. The general effect— with June Collyer wearing 
it— is ravishing. 



That lovely dusty 
pink shade, in chif- 
fon, fashions this 
willowy evening 
dress. The skirt fits 
about the hips, flairs 
about the knees and 
floats out from the 
ankles. The top part 
is gathered on to a 
panel that runs 
straight down the 
front and helps to 
form the fullness in 
the skirt front. 



89 




Rita La Roy shows a stunning 
version of that indispensable 
garment, the midnight blue 
(or black) evening gown. 
Wearable from October till 
March. Always looks smart. 
But it must follow rather se- 
vere lines and, my dears, 
velvet seldom needs trim- 
ming. This model has novel 
diagonal shirring at the hip 
line. 



Marion Schilling shows you 
what to wear on Sunday 
evenings or when you 
haven't been able to find 
out whether it's going to be 
formal or not. It's the 1931 
edition of the popular 1930 
fishnet restaurant dress. 
Don't you love the cute 
little ruffles on the short 
sleeves? Elbow length gloves 
with this sort of frock, please, 
and a matching velvet hat. 



Velvet keeps its straight lines— tulle bil- 
lows softly— metal and jewel embroidery 
returns with discretion— if winter comes, 
they'll be ready for its festivities 



Joan Bennett's blonde 
prettiness is even more 
so in white. While the 
frothy white frock below 
reminds us how they 
wore them years ago, the 
three-quarter length 
evening wrap of velvet, 
fox trimmed, is distinctly 
of the 1930 mode. The 
sleeves start out with the 
idea of fitting closely and 
suddenly widen out in a 
circular flair. 




90 



A perfect duck of a party 
frock, below, worn by 
Sue Carol. It's a . soft, 
rosy satin down to the 
knees, where it suddenly 
changes its mind and 
finishes up in pink silk 
ninon. A large and gor- 
geous flower ornament 
is applied to the girdle 
line. Gathered cap 
sleeves are kept where 
they belong by a tiny 
shirred band. 




Irene Delroy, wearing the 
most useful kind of an eve- 
ning wrap ever. But, of 
course, black and white' is 
always useful and always 
smart. This one is black 
caracul— very gorgeous flat 
caracul— and has a luscious, 
stand-up collar and deep 
cuffs of ermine." 



One of Bebe Daniels fa- 
vorite gowns, designed by 
Greer — a gentleman out 
Hollywood way who knows 
a lot about clothes. It is of 
white satin, embroidered in 
small clusters of brilliants, 
scattered here and there. 
The fullness in the lower 
part of the skirt is achieved 
by intricate cutting at the 
knee line. 



It's no use talking, evening dresses are 
very, very long, even when you're very, 
very young. Some of Hollywood's fairest 
parade, wearing their very best clothes 



91 



THE 



GIFTS 

THEY 
GET 




By 

HARRIETE MARSH 



When a fan sent Alice White two white rabbits 
he certainly started something. Pretty soon the 
White household was overrun. 



THOSE who are famous on the silver-sheet gain 
many cherished things — wealth, adulation and lux- 
uries among them. It is very doubtful, though, if 
any one thing gives them the real personal pleasure 
they derive from the many unique and, in some cases, 
extremely rare gifts which their film followers send 
them. 

From all corners of the glohe comes a regular 



o 



ne 



of the stars' 



presents they receive from their 



flood of presents. Dogs, monkeys, turtles, bees 
and canary birds from a variety of countries 
An antique mirror from France, a bowie 
knife from Africa, embroidered robes 
from Japan, dishes from England, 
pottery from Mexico — well, 
name the rest yourself, for 
almost any gift you can 
think of has at one time 
or another been pre- 
sented to a screen player 
by an adoring fan. 

Not all the gifts are elaborate, 
by any means. Some are quite 

simple and worth comparatively little some $tar SQme 

as tar as monetary value goes. Others 
are jewel encrusted and worth a king's ran- time 
But it isn't the amount of money they 



and she wouldn't part with it for any amount of money. 

Irene Rich received an exquisite fan early this year 
from an admirer in far-off France. The base is intri- 
cately carved ivory, while the body is of parchment, 
decorated with rich oil paintings of famous women in 
history. It has actual value as well as sentimental 
interest for Miss Rich. 

Winnie Lightner's most unusual gift is a tiny 
apron, about doll size, sent her by an admirer 
in the East, fn the center of the apron is a 
tiny pocket, in which was concealed a 
letter asking for her picture. An- 
greatest I'OVS are the other curious gift she treasures is 

Si/ an ash tray, carved of pine wood, 

with a v turkey in the center 



adoring fans. Almost every gift you can 
possibly imagine— and a lot you 
can't— has been sent to 



som. 

cost that matters — it is the spirit in which the 
things are sent that really counts with the stars. 

Take the case of the little orphan children in a 
Missouri home, who, knowing Joan Crawford's love for 
toys of all kinds, made with their own tiny hands a 
toy elephant and sent it to her because she ''made life 
so much brighter." The little animal is made of light 
brown felt and its saddle contains a small powder 
mff and rouge pad. The gift is Joan's favorite 



The turkey's spread tail is 
made of pine needles. 
Would you think of 
giving girls you didn't 
know stuffed dogs ? Scores 
of people not only think of it but 
have contributed to the huge col- 
lection of stuffed canines that belongs 
to Dorothy Lee. Dorothy has nearly 
three hundred such pets. Her reputation as 
a collector is country-wide and hardly a week 
passes that the mails do not bring Dorothy a new 
dog for her menagerie. Not only fans but also 
companies putting new and novel stuffed pups on the 
market habitually send one to Miss Lee for her collection. 
The "game" room of her home is literally swarming with 
these toys while every other room in the house boasts at 
least one or two dozen, some hardlv more than an inch 
high, others as big as real, live police dogs. 

Live animals, too, play a big part in the list of gifts. 



92 




Here's an extraordinarily ancient book which was 
sent to Clara Bow by an ardent admirer. The 
book originally came from India. 



"Oh," a great breeded bulldog with a wonderful ped- 
igree, follows Nick Stuart around wherever he goes— he's 
one friend with whom Nick will never part. "Oh" was 
presented to him by one of his Los Angeles' fans, a 
'prominent attorney. 

A Mary Brian admirer, living in the Imperial Valley, 
California, sent her two turtles. Mary says they must be 
twins, for both have the same name, "23", and it's painted 
on their backs! 

The friend who sent Alice White the two white rabbits 
may not have realized what might happen. Alice dwells 
in an apartment in Hollywood. It has its own backyard 
but the yard is rather small. However, it was plenty big 
enough to hold "Bunny" and "Funny," two rabbits from 
a fan admirer. Recently, however, "Bunny" and "Funny" 
were removed to a farm — and took with them a remark- 
able following of children, grandchildren and great-grand- 
children! Let this be a lesson to fans and if they must 
give rabbits to stars, give *two rabbits named Pat and 
Mike or Tom and Jerry — not Pat and Mary or Tom 
and Florence ! 

A FAN in Texas sent Janet Gaynor three ducks when 
she was playing in "Christina." As it was a 
picture with a Holland background, he suggested they 
might need some ducks ! And further suggested that 
when they were finished with the picture, the troupe could 
have a swell feed ! However, Janet vetoed this sugges- 
tion and took the ducks to keep in her backyard. 

John Mack Brown treasures two gifts from among the 
many he has received from fans — one is the beautiful 
police dog which was given to him when it was a mere 
puppy. Johnny spends many hours on the beach with his 
dog and it goes with him wherever he goes. The other 
gift is "Butts," a trained monkey sent him by an ardent 
fan in South America. (Continued on page^W) 




This decidely odd Japanese kimono was sent to 
Nick Stuart by a Japanese girl who is one of his 
most devoted and loyal fans. 



93 




Two people— three loves. The real love of 
their private lives and the love they assume 
for the microphones and cameras. At left, 
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., and his wife, Joan 
Crawford. Above, Joan and Robert Mont- 
gomery in "Our Blushing Brides." Below, 
Doug and Glenda Farrell in "Little Caeser." 



LOVES 





95 




VENETIAN 



'Ah, Loretta, mia car- 
issi'ma !" sighs David. 
"Ah, David, my own!" 
sighs Loretta. "My 
father has given me the 
gondola for the day," 
hints David. 



"How lovely it would 
be to float on the la- 
goon," replies Loretta. 
"But my mother says 
I must remain at home 
today." 



David is properly de- 
jected. But he is not 
going to give up. He 
sings his best songs in 
his best voice. Loretta 
listens entranced— her 
filial resolves weakens. 





A delightful little love story 




ANCE 




Loretta returns with 
mama's consent. And 
David asks the heavens 
to bear witness that 
Loretta's mama is the 
kindest, the most gra- 
cious, and the sweetest 
lady in all Italy. 




'Perhaps if I offer to 
cook all the dinners for 
the rest of the week, 
mama may let me go- 
that is, if you really want 
me to," she smiles at 
David. 



All is well. The sun is 
bright and the waters 
are blue. Loretta has 
no misgivings about 
mama. And David has 
papa's consent to keep 
the gondola all day. 
Happy lovers! 



enacted by two charming players 



"Adios," the picture in which Richard Barthelmess plays a 
Mexican bandit, promises to be one of the most successful 
pictures of his long and varied career. And that means a lot, 
for, according to First National, this star has never had a failure. 



CLOSE UP 




By Joseph Henry Steele 



His eyes are penetrating. One 
never quite forgets them. His 
jaws are square and his lips are 
firm. His lips form a crooked 
line running down to the right. 
Thus this famous face is 
brilliantly described. 



This delightful study of Richard Barthelmess gives 
you an intimate picture of this charming young 
man in a few brief but colorful words 



THE living room of the Richard Barthelmess suite 
at First National- Vitaphone studios. 
Cream curtains floating in a vagrant breeze. A 
phalanx of celebrities looking down from the walls. 
David Wark Griffith in a highcrowned felt hat. A 
scribbled autograph. To Richard the Great— Old times 
and new— D. W. — his mark, $. 

Precious momentoes of "Tol'able David." The rifle 
and powder horn. A Ralph Barton caricature and a 
Royal Stowell pastelle. 

Cool and lazy views of the yacht "Pegasus." "Patent 
Leather Kid" boxing gloves and a "Dawn Patrol" broken 
propeller. A heroic bust by Ricardo Harlan. 

Beautiful ladies, wistful and modern. Leading ladies 
from the sprite-like Gishes to Betty Compson and Marian 
Nixon. Those of bygone days, too — Clarine Seymour, 



dainty Marguerite Clark and exotic Alia Nazimova. 

A silly picture of Clayton, Jackson and Durante. The 
Academy annual award attributing to. . . . 

THP2 door opens and he is here. 
The jangle of spurs and a dark-visaged Mexican 
bandido. Two large eyes of bottomless brown. , Sombre 
and kaleidoscopic. Curiosity and a sincere welcome. A 
pair of good shoulders and a firm, friendly grip. "Sorry to 
be late." Spoken quickly. "Just saw 'The Dawn Patrol.' 
Haven't much time. Expect to finish 'Adios' this week." 

His eyes are penetrating. One never quite forgets 
them. His jaws are square and his lips are firm. His 
lips form a crooked line running downward toward the 
right. The crooked, wistful smile that is the Barthelmess 
trade-mark famous everywhere. {Continued on page 112) 

99 



This gentleman from Montana— none other than Gary Cooper- 
has evidently mislayed his horse. However, some of the 
Paramount electrician's equipment came in handy for an in- 
formal portrait of this lean and likeable young man from the 
West. How do you like ? Personally, we're for him, 
a-horseback or a-lamp-back. 



Insurance policies 
have often been is- 
sued for strange and 
unusual risks, but it 
takes the movies to 
provide the most 
unique and amazing 
policies of all 

By 

Mary Sharon 



You can easily picture 
the risks that M-G-M 
took when it sent a com- 
pany of actors, including 
Harry Carey, to Africa to 
film "Trader Horn," 
These risks were simply 
innumerable and they 
were ail covered. 




MATTERS of POLICY 



TO insure or not to insure" may be a debatable topic 
with some people but not with citizens of Holly- 
wood. Here you find policies that run all the way 
from the sublime to the ridiculous. 
Where, but in Hollywood, would you find one and the 
same beneficiary named in earthquake, finger, dog and life 
insurance policies? "Ukelele Ike" Edwards has all four. 
Needless to mention, his policy on his fingers is the most 
important. It is written for $100,000 but has a double 
indemnity clause. Should he become disabled in the pur- 
suance of his duties and unable to wield a ukelele pick 
in a satisfactory manner, through this indemnity clause 
he would receive $200,000. Hangnails can hold no terrors 
for him. 

When Bess Meredyth was thrown through her wind- 
shield in an automobile accident and suffered terrible 



lacerations about her face, Hollywood experienced a shock. 
Then, the reaction set in. The stars went "en masse" to 
the nearest insurance office and took out scar policies! 

XTORMA TALMADGE was the first to be accepted for 
star insurance. Her policy was written for $200,000 
which seems a small amount for a face like Norma's. On 
the other hand, one could buy almost a new face for that 
amount. 

Dorothy Sebastian, Anita Page, Bessie Love and Kay 
Johnson all carry heavy scar and accident insurance 
policies. 

Fifteen persons rushed out for eye insurance policies 
following the recent accident to Mel Brown, who was 
rendered blind in one eye by the powerful ray of a sun 
arc, while working on an RKO talkie. 

' 101 




Here is some of the 
camera equipment of 
"The Sea Bat" com- 
pany. A barge sank 
and a number of cam- 
eras were lost. But 
"location insurance" 
covered the loss. 



Ben Turpin's crossed eyes have always been heavily 
insured. 

When Louise Fazenda was appearing in old Mack 
Sennett comedies, the studio had a $100,000 insurance 
policy covering her two pig-tails. Louise had to go 
through several fire and water stunts which made the use 
of a wig impossible and, as thousands of dollars were 
tied up in the production, insurance on her funny braids 
was taken out to protect the studio in the event that it 
would be impossible through accident to complete the 
film. 

"DUDOLPH FRIML, the rightly successful and highly 
temperamental musician, who created the score for 
"Bride 66" for Samuel Goldwyn, has insured his hands 
for $500,000. 

Natalie Moorehead, one of the film city's most stunning 
blondes, has insured her hands for $10,000 each. 

"My career would be ruined if my hands were injured," 
she explained as she chatted with me between scenes on 
the First National sound stage. "I talk with them as 
much as I do with my voice." 

Ann Pennington has her knees insured for $250,000 
against scar, accident and disability. 

Joan Crawford carries similar insurance upon her 
dancing feet. 

Naturally, the stars carry heavy voice insurance. 

Corinne Griffith became the trail blazer in this direction 
when she insured her voice for $1,000,000. Warner 
Brothers followed suit by insuring the voice of Vivienne 
Segal for $250,000. Lawrence Tibbett and Grace Moore 
carry million dollar policies on their voices. Rudy Vallee, 
the vagabond crooner, carries $75,000 voice insurance. 
Plarry Langdon brings up the rear with a $50,000 policy 
upon his voice. It is no laughing matter with Harry but 
shows his sound business sense, for his voice is his greatest 
asset in the talkies. 

The voice of Mary Lewis is insured for $500,000. She 

102 



put her affirmation to her Pathe contract and insurance 
policy through the medium of sound recording instruments 
and cameras.; This is the first instance of binding agree- 
ments being entered into vocally, and may be the begin- 
ning of a new custom. 

Marion Davies has her jewel collection insured for 
$500,000. Norma Talmadge carries a policy of $250,000 
on her gems. Many other stars have jewelry insurance. 



ST 5 % 















d at srjsi £Li*.0£l 


y & sts 

















No. . 15915 . 

Certificate of Insurance 

T1h3 is to Certffy that the undersigned have procured inaoranfif 1 ashereinaftu: 
specified from 

UNDERWRTTERS AT LLOYD'S, London 

Subject to the tenna aiid coiniitiens of Lievd'R Regnlar 

ueam ( m* Jt-a ! isv scums saos ........ Wfej 

inlaw of PQUOIAS 3AIKBAK1S 

ors sKDsss sre-TY teto-ako doiubs 



in the amount ot 



I the 



H3H, 18 



and ending with tneTHIH2::*-?X3S2 



$180,000.- isitsst AscnMOtii. astra ot loss w r.c lass .3 ?.t 

ca o:s c? sisa, cs fjss 2:33:. ;rs na less r? 033 : ; -3 cs. 
cenr sm. mo *> 00m rrs ssa c?.r« «rs=> 1? • is 
sum is soasbed mmt vnmm wmm ; -is nr.* 
to ttm iK kssss so r-j.7 thb asstc! tsz in uo» 
akeab oa ao: m kohoss piojdbbs. 

is oiss o? iosm jBsaotaar suaaase* w mtux* 
Kits potior stao pats 4 asm* tTi.:;!:-; ;ieo: 
P3B IDB. $52 -MI -c r-S TCUS tn DOS - A3 
A00ISS3T iFCMs K-3) I'OMOY 10 33 I3S733 CS T3:3 SKK. 

ICSS IF AEY PAYAaiS «0 133 BOKSAS rjUKGB ?I0' "33 
JCBQgATICg. 



Here is one of the very first insurance policies ever 
issued to cover a movie actor's features. Douglas 
Fairbanks was the actor for whom this policy was 
issued. Since that time many similar policies have 
been held by Hollywood movie stars. 



From pig-tail and finger insurance to swimming pool insurance 
is a pretty far cry— but by no means too far for Hollywood 



George Olsen, popular orchestra leader at the Roose- 
velt Hotel in Hollywood, has taken out love insurance 
on his orchestra boys. Contrary to what many think, love 
insurance does not mean that the musicians must eschew 
love and marriage. However, should they or their wives 
cause unpleasantness or loss of contracts through sudden 
marriages the insurance company will make good their 
loss. 

"I had to do it in justice to myself," Olsen insists. 
"When I first organized my orchestra, I realized that I 
had a fine looking bunch of boys. 
Upon coming to Hollywood some of 
them got married. This came very 
near to disrupting my or- 
chestra. Supposing the 
orchestra has a nation- 
wide tour to make and 
some of the boys' wives 
object. What happens? 
The boys stay with their 
wives. The result is that 
I lose a young man on 
whom I have spent con- 
siderable time and money 
training for my orchestra. 
Love Insurance sounds 
sensational but it is really 
a cool-headed precaution." 



M 



R. AND MRS. 
JAMES GLEASON 
have a unique insurance 
policy written for $50,000 
upon their swimming pool. 
Any one injured in or near 
the pool ; dresses spotted 
by splashing water ; or any 
kind of damages or casualties result- 
ing from the pool are taken care of by 
this policy. 

The first time Mrs. Gleason went 
into the pool after it was built last 
spring, she cut her foot quite badly on 
a broken electric light bulb and three 
stitches had to be taken to close the 
wound. This convinced her of the 
need for insurance. 

William Janney was attending a 
garden party at the Gleason home several weeks ago and 
slipped on a stone. 

"Please, Bill," Mrs. Gleason implored, "Don't hurt 
yourself here. Go near the pool, if you must fall, for you 
are protected by insurance over there." 




Rudolf Friml, the highly suc- 
cessful musician who created 
the score for Sam Goldwyn's 
"Bride 66", considers that his 
hands are worth insurance to 
the amount of half a million 
dollars. 



OBERT ARMSTRONG carries servant insurance. 
According to California law, a servant injured in the 
employ of anyone is privileged to recover damages. Rob- 
ert has complete insurance coverage on each of his three 
colored servants, which takes care of injuries sustained 
in falling down stairs, gas explosions or any other acci- 
dents that may occur to them about the house or grounds 
while they are performing their duties. 

Some time ago a rumor went the rounds that a well- 
known director took out temperament insurance for Jetta 
Goudal, during one of his large productions in which she 
had a prominent role. It doesn't sound implausible. 



No doubt every producer would like to protect himself 
in this manner if possible. The overhead of many costly 
productions has been vastly increased through the whims 
and vagaries of temperamental stars. 

The highest horse insurance in Hollywood is carried by 
Ken Maynard for his thoroughbred, Tarzan, which ap- 
pears with him in his talkie-westerns. Ken has three 
different policies on Tarzan which aggregate $35,000. 

Through the compensation laws of California, pro- 
ducers must insure their cast against accident and death. 

Two years ago the double for Doro- 
thy Dwan was caught in a whirlpool. 
The canoe which she was piloting 
down stream overturned 
and she was flung against 
a rock and drowned, even 
though Tom Mix leaped 
in and did his best to res- 
cue her. The girl's par- 
ents received compensa- 
tion insurance for the acci- 
dent. 

SIMILAR incident 
occurred in the matter 
of insurance, when Ruth 
Elder's double was killed 
in an airplane accident 
during the filming of a 
Hoot Gibson feature. The 
double, who was a trained 
parachute jumper, was re- 
quired to do a jump from 
2,000 feet in the air. The 
chute did not open. Some 
of the spectators claimed 
that she committed suicide, 
others that she fainted. Some insisted 
that the chute was faulty. At any rate, 
she was killed and her relatives were 
given conpensation insurance. 

All companies carry tremendous in- 
surance on the pictures in production. 
The raw film is insured and all the 
while it is in the camera, the labora- 
tory, the cutting room and the sound 
room, the negative is entirely covered. 
The insurance is not removed until 
the picture reaches the exhibitor. 

Laboratory fires have sorely taxed the insurance com- 
panies. Film is highly explosive and the merest friction 
may result in tremendous loss both of negative and lives. 
In the event of a fire, studio workers would have a small 
chance of reaching safety. 

Recently, the Consolidated Laboratory in Hollywood 
caught fire and burned. Several major talking pictures 
were lost in the conflagration and insurance companies set 
about to remedy the tremendous risk. A new sprinkling 
and fire system was installed in the various laboratories. 
The moment that a fire occurs, an automatic device causes 
the water to fall from the ceiling of every room, and at 
the same time an alarm rings at the local fire station, 
guaranteeing immediate succor from the fire department. 
Tests made of the new device have been entirely satisfac- 
tory so that the biggest bugbear of the insurance com- 
panies may be a thing of the past. (Continued on page 115) 

103 



BEAUTY ADVICE 

THE BEAUTY BUDGET 

By MARY BIDDLE 



I'M almost ready to wager that 
most girls, even the most sys- 
tematic and far-sighted ones, 
have never thought of putting 
their beauty on a budget. Well, 
why not ? You budget your clothes, 
your food, your commutation, and 
your amusement — and then you 
find yourself unable to resist a 
new perfume and squander enough 
to keep you in beauty aids for six 
months. Don't you? Anyway, 
I've done so myself in the past. 

Now, then : you must have 
powder, rouge, lipstick and cold 
cream. You must have your nails 
clone and your hair shampooed. 
(You really can take care of those 
two little items yourself, you 
know.) You must do things about 

your figure and your weight. And even though it isn't 
precisely necessary, what feminine soul does not occasion- 
ally crave that very flaqon of expensive perfume I was 
talking about, or some costly trifle for her dressing table? 
Well, well; — all in good time, my dears, all in good time. 

WHY PAY FOR THE BOX? 

My humble suggestion is that you reduce the absolute 
essentials to an absolute minimum and save the surplus 
beauty money for the things you just can't economize on. 
(I'll speak of them later.) It's quite possible to buy the 
very best powder, rouge and lipstick cheaply. How manv 
times do you buy the bee-yootiful box that the powder 
comes in, extravagantly passing by the cosmetic with the 
unromantic name which comes in the unromantic tin can 
or cardboard box ? 

In most large cities, there is to be found somewhere one 
of those delightful beauty experts (a person who really 
knows something about the skin) who mixes powder to 
suit the individual. And rouge and lipstick. He turns a 
strong light on your face, bringing out its worst points, 
and sends you home with the materials to bring out its 
best points. I pay three dollars for a very generous box 




Having had her hair curled, Irene Dunne 
is now having her eyelashes curled by 
Ern Westmore, head of the RKO 
make-up department. All of which 
proves that being beautiful is a com- 
plicated business. 



from one of these gentlemen — a 
box which lasts six months. And 
I don't skimp on it either. (That's 
twelve and a half cents a week, 
dears, if my arithmetic is what it 
should be.) The paste rouge costs 
two dollars and lasts over a year. 
The darn lipstick seems to last for- 
ever. Why not look up such an 
expert ? 

TRY A TEA KETTLE WAVE 



Then there's the little matter of 
having your hair waved. How 
many of you try — really try — to 
do it yourself? You know, there 
are very few heads of hair in this 
world which don't have a little bit 
of a natural wave, or a tendency 
to dip gracefully around the face. Very, very few peo- 
ple have absolutely straight hair — and. of course, they 
had better get themselves a very swell permanent wave 
immediately. But the majority of you — don't rush off 
and get a marcel every time you have an important date. 
Constant use of irons on the hair can't do it any good— 
don't tell me! And my main objection to this finger- 
waving business is that they will use that stickum stuff. 

"Oh, no, modom, the preparation is quite safe!" My 
polite retort is "Nonsense!" Maybe it is harmless. 
Nevertheless, it makes the hair dull and dead looking. 

I'll bet you haven't heard of this : fill the tea kettle half 
full, let it boil very hard — so that the steam rushes out 
of the spout. Put your head in the steam (not too close, 
now) and let the vapor thoroughly permeate it. (Inci- 
dentally, steaming is excellent for the complexion.) Stay 
there for about fifteen minutes, tossing the hair about 
and fluffing it around the face. The vapor will condense 
in tiny drops on the top of the hair; instead of making 
your hair stick close to your scalp in a dank and soppy 
way, it will cause it to become slightly wiry and very 
easy to manage. While it is still warm, press waves into 
place. This system works for both the very fuzzy sort 
of hair and the only slightly (Continued on page J 27) 



First of a series on how to make the most of your beauty 



104 



Lucky Thirteen 

{Continued from Page 58) 



her return, she persisted in her deter- 
mination, parental opposition was with- 
drawn — but no special assistance was 
forthcoming. 

Her very first role was Shakespear- 
ian. Kay was the queen of the players 
in a modern "Hamlet." Then she re- 
turned to the stamping grounds so fa- 
miliar to her mother, and trouped 
through Cincinnati, Dayton, Indian- 
apolis and "points West" with the 
Stuart Walker Stock Company. 

~\X7H EN next she saw Broadway it 
* * was as a full-fledged thespian, and 
she managed to remain on the Big 
Street as a member of the cast in 
"Venus" — later in "Crime" — and finally 
with Walter Huston in "Elmer the 
Great." Oddly enough, her next talkie, 
"The Virtuous Sin," features Kay op- 
posite this actor, and it was with him, 
too, that she made her movie debut in 
"Gentlemen of the Press." 

That picture was photographed in the 
Paramount New York studios, and at 
the time, director Millard Webb sought 
a blonde for the part. But the mega- 
phone-man knew a discovery when he 
saw one, and he was too clever to pass 
•up a bet like Kay Francis because she 
happened to be brunette. 

They do say that there was quite a 
romance budding between Millard and 
Kay during those days on the Long 
Island lot. But the Webb preference 
for blondes finally asserted itself in his 
marriage to Mary Eaton. And even 
before this the Paramount officials had 
signed Katherine Clinton's little girl to 
a Hollyw'ood contract. Westward she 
went, and three days after her arrival 
in the Santa Fe Railroad's excuse for a 
station, she was playing in Clara Bow's 
picture, "Dangerous Curves." 

OT even the presence of the Brook- 
^ lyn Bonfire could overshadow the 
work of this glamorous newcomer. A 
half-dozen other roles followed in quick 
succession. And each of them was in- 
creasingly important. In a word, Kay 
Francis joined the ranks of those who 
come, and see, and conquer Hollywood. 
Not only did she acquire an immediate 
following with the fans, but she estab- 
lished herself in the good graces of the 
studio, and attained instant popularity 
in the first rank of cinema society. In 
fact, it wasn't long before she and Ron- 
ald Colman became close friends. And 
when a divorce made Ronnie Holly- 
wood's most eligible bachelor, it became 
necessary — or at least customary — for 
Kay to deny engagement rumors as 
"silly." Nevertheless, Malibu says what 
a fine couple they'd make. 

/"\ N the screen Kay Francis has been 
a "dangerous woman." Yet in life 
she is far from the popular conception of 
a siren. She has an easy, unruffled atti- 
tude, and is seldom shaken from her 
poise. She possesses a powerful per- 
sonality, and the ability to control her 
emotions to an amazing degree. 



She has oodles of temperament — but 
no temperamentality. There is a dis- 
tinction. The girl is acutely sensitive 
and keenly alive to impressions. De- 
cidedly high-strung, she keeps herself in 
utter control. Her energy is never 
wasted — especially not in the nerve- 
wracking temperamental outbursts fa- 
miliar to the studios. She is quick to 
perceive, and grasps at once a director's 
idea of characterization. She doesn't 
complain at any amount of labor neces- 
sary to get just the proper shading. 

She is tolerant and friendly. Al- 
though she possesses a pungent and un- 
failing sense of humor, and has a hearty 
laugh, her fun is never unrestrained or 
boisterously hilarious. According to 
Bill Powell, she is most popular with 
discriminating men of a sensitive type, 
because, he says, she understands them. 
Perhaps that description fits Ronald 
Colman better than any other chap in 
the cinema city. Powell, by the way, is 
godfather to the Francis dog. 

T/'AY has been termed the "best- 
dressed woman in Hollywood," a 
title that pleases her not at all, for she 
would willingly depart from all pre- 
tense of beauty or sartorial elegance to 
play a role with dramatic possibilities. 
In her new film she has abandoned the 
sleek, boyish pompadour style of hair- 
dress which is distinguished as a "Kay 
Francis bob," for an ear-covering coif- 
fure which terminates in a coil of hair 
at the back of her neck. 

Her present maid has been with her 
for several years — evidence of an even 



disposition. She likes substantial foods, 
and is one of those fortunates who 
dares eat as she pleases without fear of 
adding unwanted weight to her 115 
pounds. Her perfume is a blend of 
several which she mixes herself, and 
from which she never departs. She 
shines as a hostess — yet doesn't work 
at it perpetually — and doesn't inflict 
herself upon her guests. She has a con- 
tralto voice which is especially pleasing. 
The studio helpers — prop men, electri- 
cians, and the rest — are all "for" her. 
To them, severest critics of the stars, 
she's proven regular. 

/~\NE of her few superstitions is that 
^-^ there's luck in odd numbers, as 
Rory O'More is quoted in the poem. 
Thirteen has played its part in her life. 
From the date of her birth on the thir- 
teenth day of the thirteenth month fol- 
lowing her mother's marriage, through 
the production of "Hamlet" where her 
name was thirteenth on the program, to 
her arrival in Hollywood and her first 
assignment to work on stage thirteen, 
the number has pursued her. Strangely, 
the number of her house is 8401, and 
her automobile license is 1-W — 750. 
Both combinations total thirteen. 

Following the thirteen thought — 1930, 
the digits of which ad up to thirteen, 
has been a fortunate year for her. And 
in '31 — which is 13 reversed — you're 
quite sure to see the girl on our cover a 
star in her own right. For Kay Francis 
is one of the brightest prospects to 
illumine the film firmament since the 
days when pictures were speechless. 




A new portrait of the lady in whose life the number thirteen 
has played such a large part. 



105 



PREVIEWPOINTS 

A few quick glimpses at some of the pictures now in production 



MADAME SATAN (M-C-M) 




THE picture at the left shows Roland Young-, Reginald 
Denny, and Kay Johnson in a comedy moment from 
the above picture. The picture at the right shows Roland 
Young at left, Lillian Roth, Kay Johnson, Reginald 
Denny, and crowd in the ball room sequence in which 
Lillian Roth, as the attractive vamp, is out-bid as a danc- 
ing partner by the sudden arrival of Kay Johnson, as 
Madame Satan. 

This story is one of those typically DeMille affairs with 
marvelous settings, for which there is really no word to 
describe them — lavish being far too inadequate. Super- 
super-lavish is the sort of word we're striving for. 




The ball-room scene on board the zeppelin will, as the 
old familiar phrase has it, take your breath away. The ball 
is a masquerade and the various costumes are simply a 
knockout. You can easily see how this would give the 
great DeMille a chance to get very impressively colorful, 
and he certainly takes advantage of it. 

There is, of course, a thrilling sequence toward the end 
of the picture, and it's a scene no one should miss. This is 
where the zeppelin, which has been moored to the mooring 
mast during the ball, suddenly breaks away. The scenes 
of wild confusion and terror, as the zeppelin goes on its 
lurching way, will pull you up from your seat. 



LAUGHTER 




HERE is the amazingly cute star, Nancy Carroll, back 
again in a story that gives her a chance to go dra- 
matic once more. We're glad of this for we have not for- 
gotten how little Nancy came through in "The Devil's 
Holiday." Also in the cast of "Laughter," is Fredric 
March, Paramount 's handsome leading man who is 
threatening to grab off all the fan mail that comes to 
Hollywood. Frank Morgan, the famous New York stage 
actor, plays the part of Nancy's elderly husband, a serious- 
minded millionaire. March, by the way, plays the role of 
a charming pianist who falls in love with Nancy. The 

106 



(Paramount) 




role of Nancy's flapper step-daughter is played by Diane 
Ellis. This gives quite a novel twist, for Miss Ellis seems 
to be about the same age as Miss Carroll and they treat 
each other like regular girl friends instead of step-mother 
and step-daughter. 

Nancy Carroll seems to become lovelier and lovelier in 
every picture, and this is no exception to the rule. She 
has her hair fixed in a new style in some scenes, piling it 
on top of her head, a lose wave falling over the right side 
of her face. It looks fascinating. 

This promises to be one of her best pictures. 



The Modern Screen Magazine 



JHinisters 9-Year Old Boy 
l\uns 3 into 



Fortune" 



Former Poor Country Preacher Now Reveals Small Son's Secret That Saved 
Family Home and Brought Prosperity and Happiness. Tells Easy Way for 
Any Man or Woman to End Money Worries. A Remarkable Story of Dra- 
matic Facts More Thrilling Than Fiction Because It Is True. A Life Drama 
With a New Kind of Happy Ending That Will Probably Amaze You Because 
It Shows How You, Too, May Find the End of the Rainbow. 

As Related 
By REV. C. V. MCMURPHY 



WITH a sigh of despair Rev. McMurphy thought 
of the hopelessness of his present situation. 
Would the little home he had just built for his lov- 
ing family be snatched away, he thought. How could 
he ever meet the builder's notes that would soon be 
due? . How could he even earn a living, now that 
their little car had broken down and they were no 
longer able to travel their district to carry on their 
ministerial work. The outlook *as surely despairing! 
Then as swiftly as misfortune had darkened their 
home, the darkness vanished. And it was his little 
boy who lifted the shadow. "Daddy," he exclaimed, 
"don't worry any more. I have a way out of our 
troubles." Excitedly he told his astonished father of 
an article he had read about the president of a mil- 
lion dollar institution in Ohio who had founded a 
plan to help worthy men and women out of their 
financial troubles. Breathlessly he told that he had 
written this man — Curtis W. Van De Mark, called 
the great public benefactor because of the noble 
work he is doing for others. 

Eagerly Rev. McMurphy read every word about the 
vast business of this big institution scattered all 
over America — business so widespread that it is 
possible to help local men and women in a pleasant, 
dignified way. "What a generous offer! And how 
easy and simple, too. The end of my financial 
worries," exclaimed Rev. McMurphy! Why, he 
even offers to make a local profit-sharing "pardner" 
of everyone who follows his easy plan. "How 
can such a thing be possible?" thought Rev. 



McMurphy. Yet it must be true. He 
won't even let anyone risk one penny buy- 
ing anything. He just wants you to 
follow his simple plan in full or spare 
time. 

"Why .Daddy," said the boy, "even I can 
do this easy work. Let me try — please. 
Just loan me a few dollars to pay my ex- 
pense, Daddy." Awakened by the courage 
and enthusiasm of this 9-year-old child, he 
accepted this man's generous offer. But 
he also determined to allow this child to 
complete his wonderful lesson in courage and 
faith, so he let him go out alone to see what he 
would do. "My little boy came back in an hour 
with profits of nearly $3.00. I said to myself: 'If 
this child can make that much, I can make twice 
that amount.' And I took up the work. I assure 
you I now have no fear of financial problems. 
The notes on the house have been burned and we 
have a nice car to ride around in and attend to our 
church affairs. Last Saturday I went out after 2 
o'clock, made $30.00 and was back before sunset. 
If all the underpaid country preachers could learn 
what a great opportunity awaits them with you 
there would be fewer long faces from financial 
problems and more good cheer in preaching the 
gospel." This true story of Rev. McMurphy's is 
simply an example of the many letters Van has re- 
ceived from men and women whom he has helped 
toward ending their financial troubles. 




Now Van Offers Cash To Other 

Honest Men and Women 

For Just Saying 20 Magic Words to 10 
Ladies and Follotving His Simple Instructions 




You don't need 
to sell a thing to 
get this cash. This 
is the new, sen- 
sational plan of 
the famous busi- 
ness genius — Curtis 
W. Van De Mark 
the wizard who 



has already put more than 30,000 men and women 
on the road to prosperity. "Conservative" 
leaders called Van "crazy" for making this radical 
cash offer. They said it would ruin "conservative" 
traditions. But cooler heads called it a master 
stroke that would prove a tremendous boon to 
prosperity. Van not only makes you his profit- 
sharing local "pardner" — but he will actually pay 
you a cash penalty if you don't make S15 the very 
first day. 



$25,000.00 Bond 
Backs Our Products 




No Need to Sell Anything 

To Qet This Cash Penalty 



ting" 



Countless 
h o u s ewi ves 
have learned 
that they can 
make big sav- 
ings on our 
amazing bar- 
gain offers. 
So in almost 
no time the sale of our prod- 
ucts has expanded almost to the "burst- 
point. Now we must hurry and employ 



1100 more local men and women to take care of 
new and regular customers in each town. Time 
must not be wasted! Expense must not be con- 
sidered! Orders must be filled quick! Customers 
must not be kept waiting! Big money for our 
representatives means nothing to us from now onl 
So I have smashed the so-called "conservative" 
business traditions. I now offer every honest man 
and woman steady work and will pay actual cash for 
just a few hours of their time. You don't need sales 
experience. What I want is sincere men and women 
who will be as honest with me as I am with them. 



I Pay You a Cash Penalty 



Just say 20 magic words to 10 ladies — 20 secret 
words that have proven almost magical money 



getters for over 30,000 of my "pardners" — an amaz- 
ing yet simple 20-word sentence that took me 35 



"I Now Have No Fear of Financial Problems' 



years to discover and I will pay you an actual cash 
penalty if your first ten calls do not show you a big 
profit. I allow you to make a profit on every order 
my customers give you. So what is to stop you 
from making as high as $35.00 in a day like some of 
my other "Pardners?" 

I Send You 
$18 Worth of Goods 

to start you (retail value! at my risk. Send no 
money for this generaous offer — just mail applica- 
tion below. I don't let you risk one penny. I take 
all the chances. Maybe you think this is just or- 
dinary work. But don't be mistaken. If you 
treat me fairly I'll set you up in a business of your 
own. I'll tell you a priceless secret that will get 
others to make money for you. Right now I 
promise to help you toward ending your money 
worries forever, and I am known to 30,000 "Pard- 
ners" as the man who always keeps his promises. 
Mail the application below right now for our cash 
penalty agreement. Start in spare time if vou 
wish and I'll still give you my cash offer. If you 
are a married woman you can surely devote a few 
spare hours a day. My plan is a funny one. 
Some of my women "Pardners" have actually made 
more than their husbands in a few hours of this 
pleasant, dignified work. 

RUSH APPLICATION 
SEND NO MONEY 

This announcement will probably "upset" the na- 
tion. Untold thousands will applv for these open- 
ings. The time to act is NOW! Tear out the 
Application below and mail it quick. Send no money. 
This is not an order. You do not pay anything for 
this offer. Nothing will be sent C.O.D. Curtis 
W. Van De Mark, President. The Hea'th-O 
Quality Products Co., Dept. 6044-MM, Health-O 
Bldg., Cincinnati, Ohio. 



fcURT.S W. VAN DE MARK™ President, 

IThe Health-O Quality Products Co. 
Dept. 6044-MM, 

Health-O Bldg., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Dear Van: I hereby apply for opening as I 
"Pardner" in my town to start on your new I 
cash penalty plan. Send your sensational offer I 
of S18.00 worth of products (retail value) to ■ 
start me and your written warrantee. Also I 

I tell me how I can make money introducing you ■ 
to 10 ladies and using the 20 magic words and I 

(other instructions. This is not an order — 
send nothing C. O. D. I risk nothing. 1 I 
| want $ per hour. , 

| Name 



1/ You Don't Make Big Profits The Very First Day \ 



Address . 



City. 



State. 



.—I 



107 



Some More PREVIEWPOINTS 



THE LIFE OF THE PARTY (Warners) 




THE irrepressible Winnie Lightner is just as delight- 
fully irrepressible in this picture as she always is. In 
the left picture we have Charles Judels, who plays the ex- 
citable Frenchman, and Winnie Lightner, who plays the 
gold-digger. At the right we have Winnie Lightner again, 
Irene Delroy, and Jack Whiting in a dramatic moment. 

This promises to be a really good show for, besides the 
players just mentioned, it has Charles Butterworth, John 
Davidson, and Arthur Hoyt. The screen play and dia- 
logue is being written by Arthur Caesar, the man who has 
made himself famous in Hollywood for sassing his bosses. 




There is a scene in which Winnie does even better than 
her famous banquet sequence in "The Gold-Diggers." 
This is in the race track portion of the story. It seems 
that the jockey is knocked out by the villain or something, 
as jockeys have a habit of doing in the movies, and so 
our own Winnie decides to ride the horse, in person. The 
horse, incidentally, is what you might call unruly, and when 
you see Winine galloping down the course atop the most 
unruly horse (which is poetical), you will laugh your head 
off, or your ears off, or something. 

All in all, this promises to be a good one. 



SEA LEGS (Paramount) 




ON the left we have Jack Oakie and Lillian Roth in a 
cute clinch, and on the right, Oakie, Eugene Pallette 
and Harry Green. 

Of course, if you are not an Oakie fan, we can't expect 
you to get all enthused over Jack's latest riot. If you are 
an Oakie fan (and who isn't), please get ready to fall off 
your seat and roll in the aisle. 

The story concerns Searchlight Doyle, played by Jack 
Oakie, who is the erstwhile lightweight champion of the 
United States Navy and who is mistaken for Armand 
O'Brien, the most disliked sailor in the Sainte Cassette 
Navy (Sainte Cassette is the name of the mythical king- 
dom to which this navy belongs). 

108 




Of course, since Oakie is looked upon as the Navy's 
most disliked person, plenty is going to happen. They treat 
him so. badly that he decides to jump overboard, but just as 
he is going to do so, a procession of lovely girls comes out 
of a cabin, for no reason at all. This, of course, makes him 
change his mind, even though they do turn out to be the 
Captain's daughters. Into the story comes Harry Green, 
Paramount's famous Hebrew comedian, who has inspired 
many films with his own brand of humor. Jack falls in 
love with the Captain's daughter, and they have a funny 
scene when the rolling of the steamer throws them into 
each other's arms, although they have actually been quar- 
relling. The story is full of such delicious nonsense. 



The Gifts They Get 



HEDDA HOPPER has received many 
gifts, but the one she likes best is 
a very fine terrier .which came by air 
mail from New York. It is now Hed- 
da's constant companion. 

According to William Janney, his 
most delightful fan gift is likewise a 
wire-haired terrier pup. It arrived by 
messenger at Billy's home, with no 
identification except a tag that read: 
"How about giving that 'little brother' 
stuff a rest and being big brother to 
this dog?" (Most all of Janney's parts 
on the screen have been "younger 
brother" roles.) Billy looked at the dog 
and exclaimed: "Gosh, but he's cute!" 
The pup promptly started jumping 
around and barking, so young Janney 
named him "Cute" and he continues to 
be just that, chewing up everything he 
can lay his molars into. 

"Petey" came to Carmel Myers 
from the Canary Islands. "Petey" hap- 
pens to be a yellow canary and although 
he has a beautifully trained voice, he 
didn't come to Hollywood to try to get 
into talking pictures ! 

EVEN ponies are sent to favored 
ones. The most prized gift received 
by Robert Montgomery is a polo pony 
sent to him by an Eastern admirer. 

Bob is an ardent polo player and, 
since receiving the pony, has been 
spending most of his leisure time on 
the field. 

Ilka Chase, popular Fox comedienne, 
received two kittens from a fan when 
she was playing in "The Floradora 
Girl." She took them home and named 
them "Vogue" and "Vanity Fair" (her 
mother is the editor-in-chief of the 
three Vogues). Miss Chase has become 
much attached to the kittens and gives 
them the run of her Laurel Terrace 
home. 

A pet pigeon arrived at the studio for 
Bernice Ciaire. Attached was a note, 
written in a childish hand, saying it 
was a little present for her. No name 
or address was signed. 

It remained for a fan in Los Angeles 
to send James Gleason his most novel 
gift. It was a hive of bees, with an 
anonymous note, suggesting it would 
be a fitting addition to the Gleason 
home ! Jim says he doesn't know 
whether it was intended for a joke or 
not. 

However, since the bees have been 
supplying him with fine honey for his 
breakfast cakes, he says he is certain 
the joke is not on him ! 

A/IARION DAVIES has received 
many unusual gifts of flowers. Re- 
cently an English admirer sent her a 
huge box of carnations from London. 
It arrived in Hollywood exactly eight 
days after having been sent. Miss Dav- 
ies is also the proud possessor of a 
unique and priceless collection of clocks, 
sent her by fans from all parts of the 
world. 

Gary Cooper was given a rare pewter 
cup and mug made from a ram's horn. 



(Continued from page 93) 

The relics were sent to him in Holly- 
wood by an old lady fan who lives in 
Helena, Montana, near Gary's birth- 
place. 

One of Norma Shearer's most ardent 
admirers sent her a magnificent gift. 
It is a "futuristic" make-up table of 
glass and black onyx and the globe- 
shaped lamps are of crystal mounted on 
onyx bases. 

Besides "Oh", the bulldog, our old 
friend Nick Stuart received a decidedly 
odd Japanese lounging kimono from a 
Japanese girl fan, Yukiko Tomizuka of 
Tokyo, Japan. It is for beach or home 
wear. 

Miss Tomizuka is a noted de- 
signer and creator of costumes for one 
of the big film companies in Japan and 
needless to say, Nick highly prizes his 
gift. 

Clara Bow was sent an ancient book 
by a collector fan of hers in New York. 
It was printed about a century, B. C, 
in India, and Clara considers it one 
of her greatest treasures. 

John Whitting, a New York fan ad- 
mirer of Neil Hamilton, has made the 
actor one of the rarest gifts for the 
past three years. "Rare," Neil points 
out, "because the gifts have required 
great patience and effort and thought." 
Each year Mr. Whitting has sent Neil 
a beautiful scrap book. It contains 
countless hundreds of pictures and 
stories of and about Neil, collected 
throughout the year. It also contains 
poetry, personal criticisms and other 
things of particular interest to the 
screen player. The books sent thus far 
(three) are beautifully bound volumes 
and occupy prized positions in the Ham- 
ilton library. 



A MONG the many gifts Bessie Love 
has received, she prizes most the 
antique French mirror which was sent 
to her from an admirer in France. The 
mirror arrived in perfect condition and 
Bessie has hung it in the place of honor 
in the boudoir of her home. 

Maurice Chevalier is another star 
v/ho received a gift from far-away 
France. He received a stuffed, tan and 
white dog from a designer of movie 
stage sets in Paris. 

Rare and costly were the presents 
sent to Betty Compson by a Miss 
Amelia Bliss of Chicago. This lady 
traveled extensively throughout the 
world and from far corners sent to 
Betty the most beautiful Spanish shawls, 
linens, jewelry, furniture and rare china 
and antique pieces. At one time when 
Miss Compson was going to New York 
she wrote to Miss Bliss and told her she 
would like to stop off and see her in 
Chicago. She received a letter in re- 
turn in which Miss Bliss asked Betty 
please not to stop. "I've had so many 
illusions shattered during my long life," 
wrote the old lady, "I'm sure you would 
not be another but I don't want to even 
chance it ; I prefer to hold this one 
illusion always." The recent death of 
her admirer was a tragedy in Betty's 
life for, although the two had never 
met, they were the warmest of friends. 

James Hall once received four large 
bundles of bath towels from a fan, and 
a prisoner in Leavenworth once sent 
him a leather belt that he had made 
himself while in prison. 

Paul Lukas was sent a white-haired 
monkey ash tray from Hungary by one 
of his followers. On the monkey's back 
(Continued on page 129) 




Some More PREVIEWPOINTS 



BEYOND VICTORY (Pathe) 




THE picture on the left shows William Boyd and 
June Collyer, and on the right, Russell Gleason and 
Fred Scott. 

In a dug-out facing No Man's Land were five men, 
dirty, grimy and war weary. During a battle they had 
been forced to fall back, and the Germans were advanc- 
ing on them slowly. They were now waiting to throw a 
plunger which would not only kill some of the enemy but 
themselves as well. The men are William Boyd, Fred 
Scott, Lew Cody, James Gleason and Russell Gleason. 

As they wait for death, they are in a state bordering on 
hysteria and so, in order to keep them from going insane, 
the Sergeant starts to tell them about his civilian life, to 




keep their minds occupied. It seems that his wife, through 
a series of circumstances, believes that he has been untrue 
to her. This, however, is not the truth, and he asks his 
comrades that if he dies, will they do their best to find 
his wife and tell her the truth. 

Then Fred Brandon tells his story. It seems that the 
girl he loved had given birth to his child the day before he 
sailed for France and they were unable to be married. 
The girl died. Fred asks his comrades if they are saved, 
to find his child and care for it. 

Then Lew Maclntyre tells his story. The Germans 
arrive, the plunger explodes, giving the chance for a fine 
ending. 



LEATHERNECKING (RKO) 




Besides these three players, the cast also includes Louise 
Fazenda, Ned Sparks, Lilyan Tashman, and Benny Rubin. 

It seems to be a sort of semi-musical and semi-dramatic 
piece of film fare, with some excellent songs and dancing ; 
the songs composed by the famous Rogers and Hart of 
New York musical comedy fame. 

The story, what there is of it, concerns Chic Evans of 
the Marines who conceives the brilliant idea of stealing his 
captain's uniform and Distinguished Service Medal, and 
dashing off to a dance given by high Honolulu society. He 

110 




attracts the attention of Delphine Witherspoons, the 
haughty society girl who falls for him like a ton of coal. 
Then trouble begins when Chic's buddies follow him and 
also crash the ball. Still more trouble comes along when 
they get into a fight and smash a priceless vase belonging 
to the Witherspoons. Of course, Chic's deception is dis- 
covered and he is thrown into the brig, thus being sep- 
arated from the girl he loves whose name by now you 
must know is Delphine Witherspoons. 

Then a girl friend of Delphine's, realizing how much 
Chic loves her, decides to fix everything up so the two will 
be thrown together again. This, however, does not turn 
out quite as expected and plenty excitement happens. 



The Modern Screen Magazi 



Hollywood Highlight! 

(Continued from page 33) 



was half a head taller than her Romeo. 
Jobyna Howland, who stands six feet, 
two inches tall, was his beloved in "The 
Cuckoos." In his latest picture, "Half 
Shot at Sunrise," Leni Stengel is his 
sweetheart. And in all their love 
scenes she has to take him upon her 
knee. 

"Aw !" says Woolsey. 

*TpHERE have been some meteoric ca- 
* reers in pictures, but that of Lew 
Ayres ought really to stack up against 
any of them. On September 1, young 
Ayres celebrated his first anniversary as 
a picture player, and yet in that one year 
he has been cast in six pictures, in five 
of which he has played important 
roles. 

Young Ayres was playing in a Holly- 
wood orchestra when he won a small 
role in "The Kiss," the last Garbo si- 
lent picture, and students of the screen 
spotted him immediately as a great pos- 
sibility. He was then cast as the hero 
in "All Quiet on the Western Front," 
where he put over one of the greatest 
screen performances ever seen. Since 
that time he has appeared in "Common 
Clay" with Constance Bennett, "East is 
West," with Lupe Velez, and in "Hand- 
ful of Clouds." And now he has sched- 
uled the starring role in "Mississippi," 
from a popular novel. 

/^\UR own screen melodrama: 
^ The bad, bad landlord is just 
about to foreclose the mortgage on the 
aged widow when she rents her place 
for a miniature golf course. 

TF Howard Hughes, the kid million- 
*■ aire of Hollywood, had had his way 
when he opened "Hell's Angels" in 
New York, Broadway would have seen 
a ballyhoo the like of which even P. T. 
Barnum had never dreamed. But for 
several reasons it never came off. 

Having hired half of Hollywood 
Boulevard when he introduced his spec- 
tacle to Los Angeles, young Hughes 
planned to go even farther in New 
York. First, he offered the British 
Government $100,000 to permit the 
Dirigible R-100 to extend its flight to 
New York upon the night of the open- 
ing, but, because of the official mission of 
the airship the offer was declined, 
although those in charge of the 
flight would have liked to get that 
$100,000. 

Next, the young producer planned to 
have a fleet of airplanes hover over 
Broadway to pep up things, but he was 
apprised of the ordinance which pro- 
hibits stunt flying over the city. The 
next best idea was to have a lot of 
racket to brighten up things, but this 
time the Hollywood playboy was in- 
formed of the Anti-Noise Crusade, 
which right now is a very important 
campaign in New York. 

So Hughes contented himself with 
simply putting on a dignified opening 
at a cost of a mere $100,000, which to 
him is a spit in the ocean. 



DARENTAL protests have kept many 
a youth from popular fame, but ap- 
parently John Green, son of Vivian 
Green, wealthy New York broker, is 
not going to be one of them. For, like 
Roger Wolfe Kahn, young Green is 
winning a name for himself after pre- 
liminary opposition by his folks. 

His first impression was made when 
he wrote the song, "Coquette," a couple 
of years ago, but his family took hold 
of him and drove him into Wall Street. 
There he proved to be a distinguished 
flop so he started writing songs again, 
doing numbers for "The Sap From 
Syracuse" and other Paramount pic- 
tures. Now he has become so popular 
that his parents have forgiven him. He 
is twenty-one and has just married. 

1^ OT every girl in Hollywood is able 
to forge ahead upon the wings of 
the knowledge that she is a protegee of 
Mary Pickford. But Phyllis Crane is do- 
ing it, and getting along nicely, thanks. 

When "Our Mary" was casting for 
"Coquette" she had some difficulty in 
finding a girl for the role of "Betty 
Lee." But one day as she was entering 
the United Artists studio she spotted an 
auburn-haired miss who was applying 
for an extra part. She had a test taken 
of her, and, presto, Phyllis Crane was 
launched upon a career. 

The young woman is now featured in 
a Pathe comedy, "Hold the Baby," and 
it looks as if she might climb to some- 
thing worthwhile. 

HP HERE are some among the devoted 
*■ admirers of Jack Oakie who fear 
that the young man will make a nuis- 
ance of himself unless he puts on the 
brakes. At that, a lot of his wisecracks 
are just that — they are designed to get 
a rise out of persons addressed. But a 
number of them have all the earmarks 
of 'having emanated from an. inflated ego. 

During his recent sojourn in New 
York, more than one admirer turned 
against Jack because of what was 
termed his boasting. One of these erst- 
while admirers did his turning while 
the star was basking in front of a blaz- 
ing sign over the Brooklyn Paramount 
Theater which read : "Jack Oakie in 
Person." 

Indeed, Jack liked this sign so much 
that he had it shipped to Hollywood, 
where it is now being placed upon the 
roof of his garage, so that visitors who 
fly over in airplanes may mark the hal- 
lowed spot. 

YOUNG Philippe De Lacey, who is 
1 growing into a sturdy youngster, 
has hopes of appearing soon in a Broad- 
way stage production. With his adopted 
mother, the boy motored leisurely across 
the country from Hollywood for his 
first visit to New York since the time 
he arrived as a baby after having been 
rescued from a shell-torn home in Bel- 
gium. Edith De Lacey, the foster 
mother, was then a war nurse, and she 
brought the foundling home with her. 




AG* 

JUST FOR. YOU 

The living color of true beauty — a color so 
real, so different from the painty pastel 
shades of other make-up, that the beauty 
chemists who discovered it called it Phantom 
Red. For its phantom quality lets your own 
complexion tone show through and blend — 
the perfect counterpart of nature. It is 
your color — discovered just for you. 

Ash blondes with gardenia white skin — -the 
golden girls with titian hair and auburn — 
brunettes of the variest sunbrowned hue — all 
claim it as their own. Everywhere, Phantom 
Red Cosmetics have become the secret of 
personal loveliness and charm. Dorothy 
Mackaill and Lila Lee, whose pictures are 
here reproduced, and many other glorious stars 
of the screen have chosen Phantom Red for the 
natural expression of their beauty. 

Short and Sweet 

No longer is it necessary to make the dress- 
ing table a work bench, or the handbag a 
burden. With just four items of the Phantom 
Red line, you have a complete make-up for 
every purpose — the street, the office, for 
sports, for evening affairs. 



LIPS 



To the lips, Phantom 
Red Lipstick brings the 
bewitching glow of youth, 
vivid as life, revealing soft 
lip-texture. It is lasting, 
soothing, kissproof. 



CHEEKS 



Soft, satiny, seen only 
as your own true color. 
Phantom Red Rouge is your 
heart's desire. It holds its 
fresh bloom indefinitely. 




EYES 



Phantom Eye Shadow, 
neutral blue or brown, will 
delight you with its subtle, 
shadowing effect. Phantom 
Brow, in brown or black, 
gives a natural lustre to 
the lashes, adds sparkle and 
interest to the eyes. 



All Phantom Red 
Cosmetics are sold 
at leading toilet 
goods counters. For 
dainty 

10c sizes. /<pfA 
use the { ^Zfl 
coupon. 




Carlyle Laboratories, Inc., 
67 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

I enclose cents. Send — at 10c each — vanity 

sizes of the following Phantom Red Cosmetics 

( > Lipstick ( ) Rouge ( ) Brow ( ) Eye- 
Shadow 



Name 

Address. 



236 



111 



Open Letter to Clara Bow 



to him. I cannot find it in my heart 
to wonder that men flock around you. 
Your eyes and your lovely laughter must 
reassure them about life. 

\ XT HEN your first two pictures were 
* * released and you were reaching- for 
your place among the stars you used to 
come into my office and curl up in that 
old leather armchair that was losing its 
stuffing. Remember ? And you used 
to ask me what I would do about this 
thing or that thing. 

"Life is rushing me," you once said. 
"I get so puzzled. And I don't want to 
lose my head. Tell me, what would you 
do? I want to make the most of my 
life !" 

You haven't been doing that, you 
know. You've been as spendthrift with 
your emotions as you have with your 
money. You never seem to stop to count 
the cost. 

The last time you were in New York 
I tried to reach you on the telephone but 
it was no use. I didn't have the time 



(Continued from page 43) 

to explain my way through the retinue 
of flunkies and secretaries and "friends" 
that surrounded you. 

Which explains this open letter. I 
feel you're more likely to see it here 
than if it were mailed to you and opened 
by a secretary. And I, hope, too, that by 
appearing here it will 'help counteract 
some of the distorted notions people 
may have received about you from the 
press. Few stop to realize that many 
a newspaper story depends more upon 
insinuations and implications than it 
does on facts. And, of course, it is 
always more exciting to believe the 
worst. 

TT isn't too late to mend your ways. 
* You still remain on the crest in spite 
of the kind and quantity of publicity 
you have had. When your producers, 
fed up with your wild escapades, at- 
tempted to give a new star your right- 
ful place in "Paramount on Parade" the 
exhibitors all over the country are re- 
ported to have objected. That revue 



was worth the money it cost them only 
if it enabled them to display your name 
outside of their theaters. So, at the last 
minute, you were given the number in 
which you proceeded to make most of 
the other merrymaking headliners look 
like so many paper dolls. 

Youth is so short. Age is so long. 
See to it that you don't spend the latter 
financially and emotionally bankrupt. 
Remember, Clara, you have a head as 
well as a heart. And do try to use it as 
often. You can be sure when real love 
comes along the two will be in perfect 
accord. 

With both praise and criticism, 




"What do you consider the dominant, 
directing force in your career? Why 
did you become an actor ?" we ask. 

It is difficult to say what is going 
on in his mind. 

"My mother was on the stage. I sup- 
pose it was more or less natural that I 
should take up acting." 

We spoke of people. There was 



Close Up 

(Continued from page 99) 

charity and tolerance in him He views 
life detached!y, objectively. A passing 
show. Amusing. Tol'able. 

Clearly he sees human inconsisten- 
cies and weaknesses, and though he is 
maturedly sophisticated he is not 
cynic. There is little condemnation 
his makeup. 

Once his mind is made up there 



a 
in 



ts 




Marian Nixon, Robert Edeson and Dick Barthelmess in a scene 
from "Adios," Dick's latest. 



in him a definite, methodical and de- 
termined course of action. 

If the man Barthelmess has a religion 
it is the religion of good taste. Ignor- 
ance he condones, stupidity he hates. 

He most enjoyed making "Tol'able 
David," "The Enchanted Cottage," "Pa- 
tent Leather Kid" and "Dawn Patrol." 

\X7'HAT is the most important thing 
" * in acting ? 

His eyes focus on us again. 

Thought. The actor must think. It 
is not enough that he knows the action 
which is to take place. He must know 
what he is thinking, what is going on 
in his mind while that action occurs. 

If the actor thinks his scene, the 
mechanics of acting will follow, 

But not quite so simple, else there 
would be other Barthelmesses. This 
matter of thinking is the business of 
getting under the skin of the charac- 
ter, knowing him, feeling him, under- 
standing him and living him. 

f~\ N meeting Richard Barthelmess you 
sense many facets of his composi- 
tion. There is determination, courage, 
tenacity. There is the poet, the senti- 
mentalist, the realist, the romanticist 
and the modernist. 

There is a very physical man and a 
fine mind, there is love of good books 
and the company of brilliant minds. 
There is a dogged decision to make life 
give him the best it holds. 

There is introspection and keen ob- 
servation, self- analysis and a sense of 
humor. And, above all, common sense. 



112 



The Modern Screen Magazine 



A Certain Mr* Thorne 



{Continued from page 37) 

in the day's line. Between them a 
naughty French print grins over her 
shoulder at a framed picture of Rich- 
ard Barthelmess that stands precariously 
near the edge of the old-fashioned high- 
boy top. 

A frayed and dilapidated bathrobe 
drapes the bathroom door. It is two 
inches too short in the sleeves, just as 
the well-scuffed bedroom slippers are a 
size or two too large. Three stray 
cigarettes repose in a pink shaving 
mug which decorates the bathroom 
shelf. 

A half-written letter is exposed on a 
cluttered desk in the living room. It 
has been there for days. There is no 
stopper in the ink bottle, a pen has been 
carelessly thrown down. 

A gingerale bottle and a bucket (of 
what was once cracked ice) lay aban- 
doned on the kitchen table along with a 
half-squeezed lemon and an old cig- 
arette butt. 

An unopened bundle of clean laundry 
stands at attention in the corner of the 
bright red divan. A receipted bill for 
one month's rent made out to Mr. 
William Thorne peeks out from 
under the cigar box on the occasional 

table - , ™ 

Of all the days of the week, Mr. 

Thorne enjoys Sunday the most ... at 

his No. 3-B home. 



NO telephone calls rout him before 
twelve noon. The dilapidated robe 
and slippers are always convenient for 
a few hours of loafing. Or they make 
an ideal costume for, say, chucking one's 
head under the bath shower for a sham- 
poo. The sleeves are too short to get 
wet, and the collar . . . who cares about 
the collar? It isn't silk. 

On Sunday Mr. Thorne is quite given 
to puttering. First there is the paper 
to be rescued from the doorstep. But 
before it is entirely read, how about an 
egg (fried sunny-side-up) and a cup of 
coffee? Mr. Thorne is not immune to 
bragging slightly about his culinary 
talents. Only on one outrageous occa- 
sion did he permit a thin slice of toast 
to burn, and that was the time his 
mother called Mr. Thorne and informed 
him that William Powell was wanted 
at the studio for some added scenes and 
retakes. 

But, thankfully, these interruptions to 
his peace are few and far between. 
Sometimes he breakfasts on a tall white 
stool from the ledge in the kitchen. 
Now and then, when he is in a partic- 
ularly elegant mood, he carefully sets a 
corner of the living room table with a 
napkin, a sugar bowl, a bottle of cream, 
a package of cigarettes and an ash 
tray. 

Now and again, during these Sun- 
days at home, a pal will drop in for a 
friendly visit with Mr. Thorne. On 
such occasions the procedure is always 
the same: 

Mr. Thorne will raise himself lan- 
quidly from his reclining position on 
the red divan and offer a high ball — 



although he invariably recommends 
wine. With the slightest bit of encour- 
agement, he ambles into the kitchen and 
procures a keg of the stuff which he 
sets down in the middle of the floor be- 
tween the visitor and himself. Em- 
bellished with a large box of cocktail 
wafers, this informal repast will always 
prove an incentive for numerous in- 
teresting talks on music, literature, edu- 
cation and the erotic. Or the relative 
merits of tailors, the relative shortcom- 
ings of motion picture producers and 
other byways of Hollywood conversa- 
tion. Now and then the flow of talk is 
interrupted with : 
"Say when!" 

And then toward the end of the af- 
ternoon, or more exactly, when the wee 
clock on the mantle chimes a polite 
"bingbong . . . bingbong" — four o'clock, 
Mr. Thorne is usually reminded of a 
tennis match with Dick Barthelmess or 
Ronald Colman. A match to be played 
by Mr. Powell. For the briefness of a 
half hour he excuses himself and in the 
interval there is much running of water, 
much jerking out of clothes and what 
not. Then, to the visitor's dismay, Mr. 
William Powell walks slowly and ma- 
jestically from the bedroom. One 
senses a certain distant relationship be- 
tween the man who went into the bed- 
room . . . and the man who came out. 
One is almost tempted to ask Mr. Powell 
if he has seen Mr. Thorne puttering 
around in the room beyond . . . but one 
doesn't. One is sure that Mr. Powell's 
sensibilities would be offended by the 
mention of "puttering." His hair is so 
immaculately combed — when compared 
to Thome's tousled and uncombed head. 
The sports coat, fresh from the tailors, 
is so beautifully fitted — when one thinks 
of Mr. Thome's ill-fitting robe. Isn't 
it odd what a sleeve of the proper 
length will do to the appearance of 
the hands? 

OEFORE taking his leave, Mr. Powell 
. is very careful to lock up. Every 
door and window must be shut tightly — 
as though there might be a suppressed 
desire to keep this sanctum from the 
very air of Hollywood's pryings. Just 
as Mr. Powell slips out the back door, 
he turns for a last look around. As he 
does so, his eyes look very much like 
those of Mr. Thorne — such an affec- 
tionate glance ... it seems to weigh 
the privacy of these rooms and what 
they stand for in their full value. Clos- 
ing the door, Mr. Powell steps into a 
smart motor and slides away in a man- 
ner called elegent. 

The reason that the street address of 
No. 3-B has been omitted from the 
story is that privacy is such an un- 
usual thing in Hollywood that we 
wouldn't want to spoil it. Besides, Mr. 
Thorne is a whale of a nice fellow. 
There is one way in which you might 
be able to find it, however — Mr. Powell 
and Mr. Thorne are exactly alike in 
one way: they both enjoy reaching . . . 
for a high ball. 



DIAMOND "E" 

fjresh dirWindow Ventilators 



















1 



Why You Need 
CLOTH Ventilators! 

Because cloth acts as a filter against 
drafts, dust, dirt, soot, smoke, fog, 
rain, mist, hail, sleet or snow. 

Only a Cloth Ventilator will let the 
air in gradually and safely — thus 
protecting your family from danger- 
ous drafts. 

The cloth in "DIAMOND E" Ad- 
justable Window Ventilators is 
specially selected for fineness of 
weave and strength of fabric. Noth- 
ing can sift through except clean, 
fresh air. 

The "DIAMOND E" has an all steel 
frame built for durability, and hand- 
somely finished in black enamel. Will 
not rust, corrode, break, warp, split 
or fall apart. 

Sold by leading hardware, house- 
furnishing and department stores. 11 
sizes to fit any size window. Priced 
40c to $1.00. 

Several sizes of Metal Frame Cloth 
Ventilators in both black and brown 
steel frames are on sale at the stores 
of S. S. Kresge Co. and S. H. Kress & 
Co. 

If you cannot be conveniently served 
Write to 

BEH & CO., Inc., 
1140 Broadway, New York 



FALL OR WINTER 

ice Cream 
for Dessert! 

Made in 

THE "ACME" 
5-MINUTE 
ICE CREAM 
FREEZER 



It is easy to make delicious ice cream of every imag- 
inable flavor in your home at any time of the year 
at a great saving of time, work and ice. 

Ice cream, even in cool weather, is enjoyable and 
likewise very nourishing. Serve it more often. 
The Two Quart size sells at $1.00 in practically all 
stores. Also a smaller size Tin Freezer at 50c in the 
S. H. Kress & Co. Stores. 
If unable to buy an "ACME" Freezer 
Write to 

BEH & CO., Inc., 1140 Broadway, N.Y. 




113 



Their Real Names 



Hedda Hopper long ago worked as 
a chorus girl under her own name of 
Elda Furry, and about the same time 
a young man named Douglas Ullman 
was struggling along in New York's 
great Wall Street. Later he took to 
the stage and from there the screen and 
now we know " him as Douglas Fair- 
banks. 

Nancy Carroll started out in life as 
Nancy Lahiff ; Lila.Lee made her debut 
into the world as Augusta Appel. 

There's Phyllis Daniels — how many 
in the class know her? She was 
christened by that name but one day 
her grandmother was reading a story 
in which a "bebe" was the principal 
character — "bebe" is Spanish for baby 
— and it impressed her so much that 
henceforth she called Phyllis by the 
name of Bebe. 

f) ACK in Mexico, several years ago, 
Ramon Samaniegos' father wanted 
him to be a dentist, and his mother 
wanted him to be a pianist. He didn't 
want to be a dentist and he didn't have 
enough money to be a good pianist, so 
he became a movie, star . and today is 
known the world over as Ramon No- 
varro. 

James Hall was really born James 
Brown, but out of respect and admira- 
tion for a Mr. Hamilton, whose pro- 
tege he was, he took that name in place 
of his own and became noted in musical 
comedy as James Hamilton. Later, 
when Paramount gave him a contract, 
he decided to adopt the name Hall so 
as not to be confused with Neil Hamil- 
ton who was already under contract at 
the studio. 

Some of the talkie stars have real 
names quite similar to their film nom 
de plumes. For instance, Reginald 
Denny's true name happens to be Reg- 
inald Dandy; Corinne Griffith's is 
Corinne Griffen ; Lew Cody's is Lewis 
Cote, and Vera Reynolds' is Norma 
Reynolds. 

D. W. Griffith was responsible for 
at least three screen names. There was 
Kathleen Morrison working .under his 
direction. It was such a long name for 
the little Irish girl that Griffith always 
referred to her as Colleen, and before 
long the world knew her as Colleen 
Moore. 

'T'HE same is true of Juanita Horton. 

D. W. didn't like the name at all. 
"Why not have your last name 'Love' ?" 
he asked. "Everyone's going to love 
you on the screen, you know !" "Oh, all 
right," laughed Juanita. "And how 
about Bessie for a first name?" con- 
tinued Griffith. "Sure, that'll be fine," 
said the tiny, golden-haired girl — and 
so Juanita Horton became Bessie Love. 

Eve Southern started out as Elva 
Lucille McDowell. When Griffith chose 
her for a part in "Intolerance," he 
changed her last name to Southern be- 
cause she had such a soft Southern ac- 
cent, he said. Later, he told her to 
drop her middle name altogether and 



{Continued from page 47) 

then he took the "1" out of her first 
name and changed the "a" to "e" mak- 
ing her Eve Southern. 

Ralph Bushman started out in films 
with his own name but suddenly, for 
some ; reason, adopted his once-very- 
famous father's name and now calls 
himself Francis X. Bushman, Jr. 

C EVERAL years ago Marie Prevost 
was known as Marie Bickford 
Dunn ; Kathryn Carver went by the 
name of Catherine Drum ; Florence 
Vidor was known as Florence Arto, and 
Betty Bronson's friends called her by 
her full name of Elizabeth Ada Bron- 
son. Then there's Hugh Trevor, whose 
real name is Hugh Thomas ; Richard 
Dix, who came into the. world as 
Ernest Brimmer ; Walter Byron, who is 
known to his friends in . England as 
Walter Butler, and Hoot Gibson, who 
was born Edward Gibson. 

And did you know that Winnie 




Did you know that Douglas Fairbanks 
started out in life as Douglas Ullman? 



Lightner's real name is Winifred 
Hanson? That Lady Peel is justly 
famous in her professional life as Bea- 
trice Lillie? That Marion Davies was 
born Marion Douras ? And that Lane 
Chandler, when in school, sported the 
name of Robert Clinton Oakes? 

What's in a name ? Plenty, say the 
Hollywood celebrities — the difference 
between fame and oblivion. No won- 
der they aren't at all bashful about 
changing ! 

When Sue Carol and Nick Stuart 
were married they signed their real 
names on the dotted lines as Evelyn 
Lederer and Niculae. Pratza. 

Dorothy Janis' real name happens to 
be Doris Penelope Jones ; Creighton 
Hale's is Patrick Hale ; Kathryn Craw- 
ford's is Katherine Young, and Ford 
Sterling's is George Stitch. Farina, 
dark 'chocolate drop' of "Our Gang" 
fame, is known to his parents as Allen 
Clay Hoskins, and Wheezer, likewise 
of "Our Gang," is really Bobby 
Hutchins. Carol Lombard is Carole 
June Peters ; Myrna Loy, Myrna Wil- 
liams ; and June Collyer, Dorothea 
Heermance. 



EVERYONE thought that Lois Mo- 
ran was that clever young lady's 
real name, but now they say that she 
was really born as Lois Dowling. 
Leatrice Joy was really born Leatrice 
Ziegler, and Stepin Fetchit is better 
known to his dusky friends in Los An- 
geles' "darkytown" district as Theo- 
dore Lincoln Perry. Of course, you 
are curious to know Al Jolson's real 
name. 'Tis an odd one, too — Asa 
Yoelsen. 

KTUMEROLOGY was responsible for 
*■ ^ the changing of Ena Gregory's 
name to that of Marian Douglas, and 
Benjamin Greenburg, obviously a 
lengthy appellative, was shortened to 
Ben Bard. Lon Chaney's real name was 
Alonzo Chaney ; Glenn Tryon's is 
Glenn Van Tryon, and Ann Christy's is 
Gladys Harvey. . Hugh Allen sort of 
reversed his real name of Allen Hughes 
when he went into pictures, while Ar- 
mida, fiery little Mexican star, dropped 
her last name of Vendrell. 

Claud Allister's . real name is Claud 
Palmer. - He early became interested 
in conjury back in England and de- 
cided " the smart thing would be to 
change his name. When he was 18 
years old he had been doing quite a 
few magic tricks at parties. One day 
the name of a chap next door, Allister, 
popped into his head and as it appealed 
to him a lot he decided to take it for 
his own. When he came to Hollywood 
and went into talkies he still kept the 
name. 

Even good old Ben Turpin has a real 
name. It's Bernard Turpin, in case you 
didn't know. The stars are not the 
only ones who change their names, 
either — plenty of producers . and direc- 
tors have been known to do it. Con- 
sider, for example, the case of Samuel 
Goldwyn. His real name happens to 
be Goldfish and it is interesting to note 
how he came to change it. 

A great many years ago he allied 
himself with Selwyn in the forming of 
a big film corporation. For a trade 
name, they decided to combine the first 
syllable of Goldfish's name with the last 
syllable of Selwyn's. Thus the Gold- 
wyn Film Corporation came into ex- 
istence and ultimately, Goldfish took the 
name for his legal one and emerged as 
Samuel Goldwyn. 

Years past, they say Mack Sennett 
signed his real name as Michael Sin- 
nott whenever signing was necessary; 
James Cruze's boyhood friends ad- 
dressed him as Jimmie Bosen, and one 
mustn't forget Edwin Carewe whose 
real name happens to be Jay Fox. 

Rupert Julian and Joseph Von Stern- 
berg are two directors who adopted 
names other than their own. Julian's 
real name is Percival Thomas, while 
Von Sternberg's is Joseph Stern. 

So it goes — even ,unto the last. Karl 
Dane, long using one of the shortest 
names in pictures, really glories in the 
full sobriquet of Rasmus Karl Thekel- 
son Gottlieb ! Gurgle that off. 



114 



The Modern Screen Magazine 



Garbo the Athlete 



{Continued from page 73) 



never so happy ... as when they strung 
her in pearls . . . ropes and ropes of 
pearls . . . that she could twine through 
her fingers . . . and close her eyes . . . 
and make believe . . . that she was rich 
. . . and famous, like the great actresses 
she dreamed about . . . who always 
wore pearls . . . like a badge of Fame. 

AND even though she liked fashions 
^* the best ... it was always easy 
... to get her to pose in gag pic- 
tures . . . that are supposed to be funny 
. . . and she would climb ladders . . . 
and show her legs . . . and shake hands. 

Then one day . . . the publicity de- 
partment got an assignment ... a really 
tough assignment . . . and they had to 
find a girl . . . who would pose in a 
track suit . . . and "knock out" a prize 
fighter ... of mediocre standing . . . 
for the sake of art . . . and they called 
all the girls with pretty figures . . . 
and all the girls refused. 

But one young fellow . . . who hadn't 
been there long . . . and didn't know 
much about it . . . thought of Garbo 
. '. . and I was there . . . and I laughed 
at the idea ... of Garbo in a track suit 
. . . and I thought of her figure . . . 
and how long and lanky it was . . . 
for a track suit . . . but anyway . . . 
they had to have someone . . . and there 
was only one girl left . . . Garbo. 

And so they called her ... on the 
phone . . . and it wasn't long before she 
came . . . with her hat pulled over her 
eyes . . . and she seemed pleased . . . 
that they should have remembered her 
. . . for anything so important ... as 
"publeecitee" . . . and she said so. 

AND nowadays . . . when I hear 
about Garbo . . . and how mys- 
terious she is . . . and that the pub- 
licity boys never SEE her ... let alone 
in track pants ... I remember that 
day . . . four years ago . . . when she 
came back from the dressing room . . . 
in the little white suit . . . they had 
given her to wear . . . and how she 
blushed as she entered the room . . . 



and then they took her outdoors . . . 
in front of the publicity office ... to 
take the picture . . . and all of us stood 
in the window . . . and watched her 
pose . . . with boxing gloves on her 
hands . . . and a prize fighter under 
her foot . . . and at first we laughed 
. . . because the gag itself . . . wasn't 
as funny ... as was Garbo . . . but 
all of a sudden ... I looked at her 
face . . . and I saw that her head was 
high . . . and that even though there 
was a smile on her lips . . . there was 
a tear in her eye . . . and I knew right 
then . . . that she didn't like track pants 
. . . even a little bit . . . and I looked 
closer . . . and I saw that she didn't 
like prize fighters either . . . but some- 
thing in her face . . . and her eyes . . . 
seemed to cry out saying . . . "I'll do 
my best to get ahead . . . I'll do what 
they ask now . . . and always . . . until 
the world knows Garbo . . . even if I 
have to do it ... in track pants" . . . 
and then . . . the picture was taken . . . 
and she walked away. 

HP HEN a little later . . . when all the 
A boys had gone home ... I was still 
sitting there ... by the window . . . 
thinking . . . and Garbo came in . . . 
swinging an old make-up case . . . and 
there was a puzzled expression on her 
face . . . and she seemed to be think- 
ing aloud . . . "That peekchure ... it 
vas very silly" . . . and then she turned 
to me . . . and her eyes were wide . . . 
and she said . . . "When I get to be 
beeg star ... I do not pose in track- 
pants . . . with prize fighter ! . . . when 
I get beeg ... I do nothing so silly . . . 
so silly" . . . and then she turned . . . 
and strode away. 

And sometimes I think . .. . when I 
hear about Garbo now . . . and all this 
mysterious stuff . . . that it's just 
Garbo . . . carrying out that promise 
she made herself ... in the publicity 
department four years ago . . . when 
she posed with the prize fighter ... in 
track pants ... so that some day . . . 
she might be a BEEG star. 



Matters of Policy 

{Continued from page 103) 



Location insurance is taken out when- 
ever a company is sent from the home 
studio for work. The largest location 
insurance policy ever issued upon a 
single company was written on the 
M-G-M unit which was sent to Africa 
to film "Trader Horn." 

TOURING the filming of "The Sea 
Bat" recently, the small raft, which 
was being trailed behind the boat and 
which held the valuable cameras became 
submerged and sank. 

The machinery would have been a 



heavy loss to the company had it not 
been protected by location insurance. 

T N the beginning when the movies were 
*■ still a game and bankers refused to 
rate them as a business, little attention 
was given to the matter of insurance. 
Douglas Fairbanks was the first. 

If rumor is correct, necessity forced 
it upon him in this way. During the 
making of "Robin Hood," Douglas 
gambled too deeply. Chaplin stepped 
into the breach and put up the money. 
And he insisted on insuring Doug. 




k 



you haven't 
heard?. .. Why 

Ash's & Deere, 



course ! 



MY DEAR, you don't know 
what you've missed. You 
simply must learn this money- 
saving habit. I did, and I can't 
tell you how wonderful it's been. 

Here's the secret. Ash's lipsticks 
and eyebrow pencils,, together 
with Deere powder, rouge and 
lip salve compacts, are on sale 
at almost all chain stores. They 
are noted, you know, (or their 
guarantee of purity and listen to 
this — there's a choice of plain or 
Swivel lipsticks — loose, cake or 
sifter compacts and ever so many 
kinds of smart, colorful cases. 
Best of all — most of them only 
cost ten cents. 

Let's stop in now. I need a new 
compact and you — well you just 
wait and find out what a thrill 
you're going to get. 

At all Cham Stores 

The REICH-ASH CORP 

307 Fifth Avenue, New York 



k 



/ 




115 



Eavesdropping on Will Rogers 



man, you will possibly be helped by the 
following: Will Rogers is natural (and 
there's an entire volume). He is elec- 
tric and constantly keyed up to the 
highest pitch. His blue eyes, knifelike 
in their intensity, dart about the room 
with unresting rapidity. He sees some- 
one seven tables away and hurls a lusty 
greeting at him. His voice - is loud and 
boisterous with vitality. He punctuates 
his rapid-fire conversation with guffaws 
and belly laughs. 

Naturally the questions and answers 
did not follow quite as closely as I have 
put them. I have not bothered to put 
down the incidental conversation. You 
can imagine that yourself. All right, 
the interview begins. 

"\X7'HERE," one of his two compan- 
* * ions asked, "do the youngsters 
of today think they're going?" 

And Will gave answer approxi- 
mately like this : "What do you mean ? 
Where they goin'f As far as I know 
they ain't goin' nowheres. They're jest 



{Continued from page 35) 

tryin' to get along, same as you and I 
did at that age. If you mean all that 
old bunk about bein' wild, et cetry, why, 
that's just a big laugh. The kids of 
today ain't no worse than they was 
twenty years ago. They jest move 
faster, that's all. They got autos and 
airplanes (he says aircoplancs) and 
they sorta get around quicker'n what 
we did but what's the difference ? So 
do you and your wife and me and my 
wife. Ever'body, the whole fam'ly, gets 
out and whoops it up a little bit today 
and that's how it should be. It's jest 
a case of 'em havin' a better opportunity 
for gettin' out than they used to have. 

TEST my time we used to have to set 
*■ aroun' the house and 'visit.' I guess 
'visitin' ' was more responsible for kids 
leavin' home than anything else. Our 
idea of a big Sunday was to set around 
and stuff food till we couldn't budge 
and then spend the rest of the day 
wishin' we could die. Nowadays ever' 
body eats less and gets outdoors more 



and they're much better off for it. 

"Yes and in my day the parents spent 
half their time worrying about the kids 
— wonderin' if they'd ever amount to 
somethin' and frettin' about their diet 
or cold draug-hts or what have you. 
Well, I got three kids, oldest seventeen, 
and I don't think of 'em morning till 
night except to sort of envy 'em the 
good time they're havin'. And they 
seem to get along all right. They's just 
one thing I'd change about the young- 
sters of today. I wish they could see a 
little more of the animals than they do. 
That's where a lot of us older ones had 
'em. We come off farms or ranches 
and had chances to gallavant around 
with horses and dogs. That's good for 
boys and girls, too. Now most of the 
kids live in cities and can't tell a horse 
from a goat. That's too bad because 
kids need animals. That's because 
they're so much alike. If I had my way 
every boy'd have a pony and learn to 
play polo. My kid's beginnin' to give 
me a lot of competition at that game, 
doggone him." 

A T this point the conversation 
switched to society. Someone 
wanted to know why Will never used 
the elaborate bungalow built for him 
on the lot. "Think," he said, "of the 
gay parties you could have there." 

"That's just it!" spouted Will, giving 
the table a tremendous bang. "That's 
just why I never go near that bungalow. 
I'd have to 'entertain' and set around 
bein' bored by society. What sort of 
fun d'ya call that? Well, anyway, it's 
not my idea of a good time. So I'm 
gonna keep right on changing my 
clothes and putting on my makeup in 
my coupe and give that bungalow a 
wide berth. Because if I once start en- 
tertainin' I won't have no time for my- 
self. And that's the same reason I 
don't give parties out to my house. Yes, 
and always aim to be in Oklahoma when 
there's an opening. Maybe it's the In- 
dian in me but I'd a darned sight be 
out on a horse or up flyin' or even 
workin' than settin' around tryin' to act 
as if I was havin' a good time at a 
party. Besides, I'd jest go to sleep." 

"Is that why you haven't got a tele- 
phone ?" asked Borzage. 

"You said it ! If a man really wants 
to see me he'll find me, telephone or 
not. And if he doesn't want to see me 
about something important, but just 
wants to waste my time, why then I 
can get along without him anyhow." 

Then : "What do you do all day, 
Will ? How do you get rid of twenty- 
four hours?" 

"Well — ," he began, "it's usually gone 
before I can get rid of it. Seems like 
it's time to turn in before I get started. 
Anyhow, to begin with, I get up about 
six or six-thirty and give the polo ponies 
a work-out. That's the best time of day 
for me. It's quiet and sort of peaceful 
and nice. Seems like most people ought 
to get up around then. At least once, 
(Continued on page 129) 




The Modern Screen Magazine 



Little Liar 



(Continued from page 45) 



"You? Do me a favor?" He 
smiled. "Going to buy me a razor to 
cut my throat with, Lola ?" 
. "It's about 'Recompense,' Lola said, 
leaning forward slightly. "I have a 
hunch you won't want Arden in the 
part tomorrow. In fact, I'd bet my last 
dollar that you won't." 

"She'll work in 'Recompense,' " he 
said. "Save your breath and your last 
dollar, Lola. You'll need them both soon 
unless you pull up." 

"Well," Lola said slowly, "I've been 
doing a little research. I find that Sue 
Arden's name is not Sue Arden." 

"Not really," Derek said. "I suppose 
yours is Lolo Marvel, you little Tenth 
Avenue Annie !" 

"I didn't change my name for the 
same reason that she changed hers," 
Lola said. "She had a very good rea- 
son, though a pretty name originally. 
Her name was . . . Merle Caron." 

"Yes," he said, "that's a pretty name." 

"It doesn't mean anything to you, 
does it?" Lola said. "I brought some- 
thing along that will, though. Want to 
see?" 

Derek just stood and looked at her. 
She had a sheaf of newspaper clippings 
in her hand and was waving them 
gently back and forth under his nose. 
She shoved them in his hand, finally. 
"Look at them," she said. "That's your 
sweet little Sue Arden. I went to a 
lot of trouble to get those." 

Derek turned them over with numb 
fingers. Sue Arden's face stared back 
at him, slightly yellowed on newsprint. 
Steady eyes, she had, even in a news- 
paper photograph. 

UNDER her picture, there were de- 
tails. Merle Caron, it said, had 
been found in Stafford Tracy's apart- 
ment the night he was murdered. She 
had been wearing a negligee, and 
she had been sobbing hysterically. There 
had been blood on the negligee. Staf- 
ford Tracy's blood. That was important. 
There was a picture of the negligee, too. 
A very pretty one, slightly too large 
for Merle. 

Merle Caron declared that she had 
accepted Tracy's offer of his apartment 
for the night when he said that he 
would be out of town. She had awakened 
at the sound of a struggle, had cowered 
fearfully in her bed for several min- 
utes and had then rushed into the living 



room with a supreme effort. Stafford 
Tracy was lying on the floor, dead. She 
leaned over him and lifted his head. 
That was her explanation of the blood 
on the negligee. Perfectly natural, the 
newspapers said rather facetiously, that 
a girl would get blood on her negligee 
by leaning over a man who was covered 
with it. 

Merle Caron had been tried. There 
was only circumstantial evidence, and 
Merle was beautiful. The clippings 
about her acquittal said a lot about her 
beauty and more about the susceptibility 
of the jurors. The newspaper boys arc 
hard boiled. Jurors don't see so many 
pretty women. 



rVEREK laid the clippings on the 
table rather deliberately. "In- 
teresting," he said. "What was it you 
had to tell me?" 

"Why . . . that," Lola said, a bit 
taken aback. 

"I might have been interested if I 
hadn't known it a year ago," Derek said. 
"It's old stuff, Lola. Run along home 
now. I'm very tired." 

Lola stormed out of the apartment. 
Derek turned the clippings over and 
over, thoughtfully. He kissed the pic- 
ture with the steadiest eyes. "Little 
liar," he said gently. 

When he was sure that Lola was 
safely downstairs and out of the build- 
ing, he grabbed his hat and broke all 
speed records getting to Sue's apart- 
ment. 

She was still sitting where he had 
left her, exhausted from tears. Her 
eyes were red and swollen. He gather- 
ed her in his arms, sure of himself now. 
"Merle," he said, "will you marry me?" 

Sue quivered sharply and looked up at 
him. "You . . . knew?" she said. 

.Derek shook his head. "I didn't know 
this afternoon," he said, "or I shouldn't 
have left here. Why didn't you tell me, 
Sue darling?"^ 

Sue looked up at his eyebrows. They 
were steady, without a hint of change. 
She drew a deep breath and reached up 
to touch them. "Because of those," she 
said. 

"Those?" 

"Eyebrows," said Sue. "I was 
afraid they'd go up." 

"Not these eyebrows," Derek said, 
"ever." 



MODERN SCREEN HAS A GORGEOUS SURPRISE IN 
FICTION FOR YOU. A LOVE STORY REALLY WRITTEN 
BY ONE OF OUR MOST POPULAR LEADING MEN. 
DON'T MISS IT*. COMING SOON. 




Makes sun bleached 

h air lovely aga in 



Just use ColoRinse in the rinsing 
water after your next shampoo. You 
will be surprised and delighted how 
easily it restores the shimmering 
color sheen. It gives the hair new 
life and tone. It adds that charming, 
natural softness you love so much. 
ColoRinse is a harmless vegetable 
color — twelveshades tochoosefrom 
— that may be used as often as you 
please with the certainty of fasci- 
nating results. Made by Nestle, the 
originators of the permanentwave. 

1©C 



Buy it tvh 
you bought this 
magazine 




PHOTOS 
ENLARGED 

SIZE 8 X 10 INCHES 

Now ie your 
iihance to get a 



life-like Bromide 
photo enlarge- 
ment at an un- 
usual bargain. 
Same price for 
full length or 
bust form, 
groups, land- 
scapes, or en- 
largements of 



48 

Each 



original photo Guaranteed. 

Send NO MONEY 

JuBt mail photo or snapshot (any 
size) and within a week you will 
receive your beautiful life-like 
enlargement size 8x10 guaran- 
teed fadeless. Pay postman 48o 

plus a few cents postage or send 60c with order and we pay 
Take advantage of thiB amazing offer — seDd your photo today. 

538 So. Dearborn, Dept. 
Chicago, 111. 




REX ART 



putjuxet*. 
110 



117 




Film Gossip 

{Continued from page ij) 



Everybody was happy — except cer- 
tain dramatic critics who have never 
learned to spell the name correctly — 
nor had the faintest idea what it meant. 

* * * 

Universal is making a picture called 
"The Cat Creeps." United Artists have 
one called "The Bat Whispers" — both 
mystery — not zoo themes. 

jfc 5-1 ^ 

T^IGURE this one out if you can : 
*■ The Hays office considered the title 
"The Command to Love" too risque for 
movie consumption ; so a group of the 
refined boys got together and thought 
up "The Boudior Diplomat" as a sub- 
stitute. Subtle? 



"^T OW that Janet Gaynor and Charlie 
^ Farrell are again to be teamed un- 
der the Fox banner, the divorce reports 
concerning Janet and Lydell Peck are 
hot and heavy in the local Newspapers. 

If that manage ever survives the 
amount of gossip it has inspired since 
Janet and Lydell "stepped off" it will 
be one of the greatest miracles of 
Hollywood. 

It is hard enough for a Hollywood 
marriage to "stick" under the best con- 
ditions — but with the whole world lift- 
ing an eyebrow over Janet and Lydell, 
it must have been hard for them to 
salvage much real happiness from the 
debris. 

Anyway, Lydell doesn't look any too 
happy over on the Paramount lot . . . 
even though he has just been promoted 
to a brand new supervisors job. 



Just as everyone had Phillip Holmes 
well settled with Mary Lawlor, he is 
seen taking Mary Brian places. At least 
he sticks to "Marys" . . . and nice ones, 
too. 

% % 

\X7HAT with all the studios banning 
* * publicity concerning miniature golf 
and forbidding the players to appear, It 
was with a huge snicker that we wit- 
nessed the opening of Mary Pickford's 
own little $15,000.00 course over on 
Wilshire Boulevard. Hollywood had 
a great time that night, too. Just like 
the World's Premier of a picture, with 
the spot lights, stars, onlookers and all. 
It came to light during the evening, that 
several others among the colony are on 
the income side of a Pee Wee Course 
. . . but they asked to be forgotten. 

* * * 

/ Joan Crawford is sporting a new 
f make-up for the street. No pow- 
der; no cheek rouge; gobs of lip 
[rouge and mascara. In place of 
these regularly-accepted cosmet- 
ics, she is now using a sort of oil 
with which she generously 
anoints her skin. Looks swell for 
sports wear . . . not so hot for 
evening. 

A L JOLSON is the first big Amer- 
ican film star to invade Germany 
for the purpose of making an all-talking 
and singing picture entirely in the Ger- 
man language. 

Al has always been a great favorite 
in Germany since the advent of talkies, 
and his visit has been keenly anticipated 
by that country for a long time. Prob- 
ably the most anticipation, however, has 
been on the part of several score leading 
ladies who are all a bib and a tucker 
about the prospect of playing Jolson's 
lead. 

If you are a rabid Jolson fan (and 
who isn't?) you may be worried about 
Al's departure. Not a bit of it. He 
returns the latter part of November to 
start work on "Sons O' Guns" in which 
he will play with Lily Damita. Good 
Luck, Al. 

* * * 

DEMEMBER Ernest Torrence and 
Tully Marshall in their memorable 
roles in "The Covered Wagon" ? They 
are going to be re-united for the first 
time since that picture. They will play 
the same types in a Paramount special 
called "Fighting Caravans," a Zane 
Grey novel. 

* * * 

JOAN BENNETT is still officially 
*■* keeping her apartment at the fash- 
ionable Chateau Elysce, but most of her 
time is being spent at the Beverly Hills 
home of her svelte sister, Constance. 
This is quite a blow to the rumor hounds 
who had stirred up and circulated 
stories that the sisters were not exactly 
friendly and were waging a war for 
Bennett supremacy on the screen. 

Constance is quite devoted to Joan's 
small daughter and the three make up 
a very peaceful and devoted family 
group — something rather unusual in the 
Bennett clan. 

(Continued on page 130) 



118 



The Modern Screen M a g a z i 



"Am I My Brother's Keeper?" 



(Continued from page 75) 



Her request denied, Loretta, who 
since has travelled nearer to stardom 
than either of the others, departed in 
tears. It is said that Polly Ann, even 
to this day, does not know of Loretta's 
attempt to throw the glory to her. 

Another 1929 Wampus baby star who 
prayed that the award would go to her 
sister instead was little Raquel Torres, 
who rose to fame in "White Shadows 
in the South Seas." 

When Raquel's mother died in Her- 
mosillo, Mexico, the father brought the 
two girls to Hollywood. Then, he, too, 
passed away. Raquel went to work 
as a theater usher in order to support 
her sister. A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
executive noted her beauty, gave her a 
test — and a contract. 

Once before the cameras, she started 
a campaign in behalf of Renee. De- 
spite the fact that the younger girl was 
only an extra, Raquel urged the Wam- 
pus to eliminate her name from the 
nominations and substitute that of 
Renee. 

T UPE VELEZ is another who has 
found a place for her sister on the 
screen. 

Until three months ago, Josephine 
Velez was a dancer in a Mexico City 
cafe. Lupe sent for her and had her 
registered with Central Casting Bureau. 
Then she went to Director Tay Garnett 
and obtained from him a bit for Jose- 
phine in Pathe's "Her Man." 

HpHREE Hollywood stars who carry 
*■ out the query of the scriptures in a 
big way are Ramon Novarro, Eddie 
Ouillan and Marion Davies. 

Ramon's parents were reduced to 
poverty when their land holdings in 
Mexico were taken from them during a 
revolution. 

During his early struggles in Amer- 
ica, when his earnings as a stage dancer 
were small, Ramon hoarded even the 
pennies to feed his father and mother 
and ten brothers and sisters. When he 
finally won recognition in the films, he 
bought a beautiful home and moved the 
family to Hollywood. 

Three of the Novarro girls are now 
in a Spanish convent. The others are 
being educated by Ramon. 

THE parents and eight brothers and 
sisters of Eddie Quillan are sharing 
his success in the cinema. They came 
here upon his insistence when Eddie 
was given his first contract by Mack 
Sennett. 

EVER since Marion Davies reached 
the "big money," she has seen to it 
that her three sisters and the two child- 
ren of one of them have wanted for 
nothing that her gold could buy. Each 
week, allowance checks go forward to 
Ethel Davies, who lives with Marion, 
Renee Davies Lederer and Rosemary 
Davies Van Cleve. She has furnished 
universty educatons for Renee's two 
offspring — Pepi and Charles Lederer. 



HP HE attachment of Blanche Sweet 
and Bebe Daniels for their grand- 
mothers is unique in the film colony. 

Blanche's mother died shortly after 
Blanche's birth. When Blanche was 
seven, her father put her in a fashion- 
able boarding school in the East, but 
when she continued to plead with her 
grandmother, Blanche Alexander, to be 
taken away, that worthy literally kid- 
napped the child. 

They have been together ever since, 
and Hollywood seldom sees the younger 
Blanche without Grandma Alexander 
at her side. They share the same home. 

Bebe Daniels was only thirteen when 
she became Harold Lloyd's leading 
lady, but her first pay check went for a 
diamond ring and the down payment on 
a sedan for her mother, Mrs. Phyllis 
Daniels, and a new gown for her grand- 
mother, Mrs. George Griffin. 

Bebe always has insisted that they 
make their home with her, and Mrs. 
Daniels has served as her daughter's 
manager at a big annual salary. 

tpVERYONE knows of the devotion 
of Clara Bow to her father, whom 
she has maintained in luxury ever since 
she became a star. On four different 
occasions she has financed him in busi- 
ness enterprises. 

When Betty Compson reached star- 
dom, she purchased a home in Glendale, 
California, for her mother who had 
worked to give Betty an education. 
Then she established a trust fund for 
the parent, the income from which sup- 
plies the aged woman's every want. 

tpVEN when Mabel was Mack Sen- 
nett's only star, and she and her em- 
ployer swept and scrubbed the studio 
after the day's shooting was finished, 
Mabel was sending goodly sums to 
Josephine and her mother who live on 
Staten Island. Later she established a 
trust fund for them. On her deathbed 
she bequeathed them her entire estate. 

TvT O sooner had Jeanette MacDonald, 
Paramount's songstress, landed her- 
self in the movies, than she sent for her 
two sisters, Elsie and Blossom. Blos- 
som had been on the New York stage 
and wanted to continue her career, so 
Jeanette saw to it that she got screen 
roles. Elsie serves as Jeanette's sec- 
retary. 

Marian Nixon and her sister, Linda, 
have been particularly close to each 
other. Several years ago, Marian pur- 
chased for Linda a half interest in a 
gown shop, and bas since paid her a 
salary of $250 a month for designing 
and making her wearing apparel. 

Lilyan Tashman remembered her sis- 
ter as soon as she made good in Holly- 
wood. Kitty receives $250 a month as 
Lilyan's secretary and shares the Tash- 
man-Lowe home. 

When Dorothy Jordan was given a 
contract by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, her 
first act was to send for her sister, 
(Continued on page 127) 



• • • no more 
"brittle lashes" 




New Discovery 

Beautifies Lashes 
the Natural Way 

Found : An entirely new way to ac- 
centuate the loveliness of lashes. 
It is the new Liquid Winx with 
its unique "double treatment" 
formula. First it darkens lashes — 
gives them an enticing shadowy 
beauty. Then it softens lashes. 
Even brittle lashes become silky. 
And lashes that have been af- 
fected by ordinary mascaras soon 
regain their natural curliness . . . 
The new Liquid Winx is water- 
proof, can be applied easily and 
gives subtle — smart effects. 

Would you like to try it? Send 
10c for a trial bottle — enough 
for a month's use. 



ROSS CO., Dept. L-l, 243 West 17 St., New York City 
Enclosed is 10c for a bottle of the new Liquid Winx. 



Name 

Address.. 



Black □ Brown □ 



THE NEW 

WINX 



Preshru, 
C biQWi 

Responsible Mf'r Guarantees New Shirts for every 
one that Shrinks or Fades. Selling like Wildfire, 
Biggest Profits! Complete line includes Neck- /fltyju 
wear, Hosiery, Underwear and Jackets. Write 

Dept. BONDED SHIRT COMPANY 
S-37 81 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK /lilS^Lx \\ P. 



WRITE TO-DAY for FREE SAMPLE ^OUTFIT 



PHOTOS 
ENLARGED 



98 



Size 16x20 inches 

Same price for full 
length or bust form, 
groups, landscapes, 
pet animals, etc., or 
enlargements of any 
part of group pic- 
ture. Safe return of your own 
original photo guaranteed. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Justmail photo or snapshot (any 
size)and within a week yon will 
receive your beautiful life-like* 
enlargement sizel6x20in .guar- 
anteed fadeless. Pay postman 
98c plus postage or send $1.00 
with order and we pay postage. 

Special Free Offers 

enlargement we will send FitEB 
a hand-tinted miniature repro- 
duction of pboto Bent. Take ad" 
Vantage now of this amazing 
trffer*-send your photo today. 

UNITED PORTRAIT COMPANY 

900 W. Lake St., Dept. p-1310, Chicago, III. 

119 




The Modern Screen Directory (Players) 



"The Golden Calf." Now playing femin- 
ine lead with Amos and Andy in "Check 
and Double Check." 

CARROLL, NANCY; married to Jack Kirkland; 
born in New York City. Write her at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract Star. Hallie 
Hobart in "The Devil's Holiday." Laura 
Moore in "Follow Thru." Now working as 
Peggy Gibson in "Laughter." 

CHANEY, LON: died Thursday, August 30, 
survived by widow, non-professional; born 
in Colorado Springs, Colo. Was M-G-M 
contract star. Last two pictures, "Thun- 
der," (silent) and "The Unholy Three," 
(talkie). At work on "Cheri iBebi," at 
the time of his death, 

CHAPLIN, CHARLES: divorced from Lita 
Grey; born in London, Eng. Write him 
at the Charles Chaplin Studio. Producer- 
star. Last picture was "The Circus." 
Just finishing"City Lights." 

CHATTERTON, RUTH: married to Ralph 
Forbes; born in New York City. Write 
her at Paramount Studio. Contract star. 
Sarah Storm in "Sarah and Son." Fea- 
tured role in "Paramount on Parade." 
Pansy Gray in "Anybody's Woman." 
Now working in "The Right To Love." 

CHEVALIER, MAURICE: married to Yvonne 
Vallee; born in Paris, France. Write him 
at Paramount Studios. Contract star. 
Count Alfred in "The Love Parade." 



(Continued from page y)[ 

Pierre in "The Big Pond." Just completed 
role of Albert in "Playboy of Paris." 

CHURCHILL, MARGUERITE: unmarried; 
born in Kansas City, Missouri. Write her 
at Fox Studio. Contract player. Femi- 
nine leads in "The Diplomat," "The 
Valiant" and "The Big Trail." Now ap- 
pearing in "Good Intentions." 

CLAIRE, BERNICE: unmarried, born in Oak- 
land, California. Write her at First 
National Studio. Contract player. Mary 
Dane in "Numbered Men," Mile. Fifi in 
"The Toast of the Legion," Virginia 
Rollins in "Top Speed." 

COLBERT, CLAUDETTE: married to Norman 
Foster; born in Paris, France. Write her 
at Paramount Studio. Contract player. 
Barbara Billings in "The Big Pond," 
Lydia Thorne in "Manslaughter." Now 
on a world tour. 

COLLIER, WILLIAM JR.: unmarried; born in 
New York City. Write him at Warner 
Brothers Studio. Free lance player. Fea- 
tured role In "Lummox," United Artists; 
and "Hard-boiled Rose," Warner Brothers. 

COLLYER, JUNE: unmarried; born in New 
York City. Write her at Paramount Stu- 
dio. Contract player. Featured role in 
"Sweet Kitty Bellairs," Warner Brothers. 
Patricia Hunter in "A Man From Wyo- 
ming," Paramount. Now playing Mrs. 
Garland in "Extravagance," Tiffany. 




Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., likes his pets to be so big he can't fall over them. 
The Great Dane's name is Hamlet— get it? 



COLMAN, RONALD: separated from London 
actress-wife; born in Surrey, England. 
Write him at Sam Goldwyn Studio. Con- 
tract star. Stellar roles in "Condemned," 
and "Bulldog Drummond." Title role 
in "Raffles." Now making untitled 
picture. 

COMPSON, BETTY: divorced from James 
Cruze; born in Beaver, Utah. Write her at 
RKO Studio. Free lance star. Jane in 
"Inside the Lines," RKO. Sally in "The 
Midnight Mystery," RKO. Now working 
in "The Boudoir Diplomat," Universal. 

COOGAN, JACKIE: unmarried; born in Los 
Angeles, California. Write him at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract player. Now 
staging screen come-back in title role of 
"Tom Sawyer." 

COOPER, GARY: unmarried; born in Helena, 
Montana. Write him at Paramount Stu- 
dio. Contract star. Jim Baker in "A 
Man from Wyoming." Glenister in "The 
Spoilers." Now playing Tom Brown in 
"Morocco." 

CRAWFORD, JOAN: married to Douglas Fair- 
banks, Jr.; born in San Antonio, Texas. 
Write her at M-G-M Studio. Contract 
star. Jerry in "Our Blushing Brides." 
Now at work on "Great Day." 

CODY, LEW: widower; born in Berlin, New 
Hampshire. Write him at Pathe Studio. 
Free lance player. Played opposite Glotia 
Swanson in "What A Widow." Now 
working in "Beyond Victory" for Pathe. 

DAMITA, LILY: unmarried; born in Paris, 
France. Write her at Sam Goldwyn Stu- 
dio. Contract player. Leading roles in 
"The Rescue," Sam Goldwyn; "The 
Bridge of San Luis Rey," M-G-M; and 
"The Cock-Eyed World," Fox. On New 
York stage for last year, but returning 
shortly to the talkies. 

DANIELS, BEBE: married to Ben Lyon; born 
in Dallas, Texas. Write her at RKO. Con- 
tract star. Title roles in "Rio Rita," 
"Dixiana, " and "Alias French Gertie." 
Now playing opposite Douglas Fairbanks 
in "Reaching for the Moon" for United 
Artists. 

DELL, CLAUDIA: unmarried; born in San 
Antonio, Texas. Write her at Warner 
Brothers Studio. Contract player. Anna- 
bel in "Big Boy" and Sally in "Sit Tight." 
Now working in "Fifty Million French- 
men." 

DENNY, REGINALD: married to Bubbles 
Steifel; born in London, England. Write 
him at M-G-M Studio. Contract star. 
Male lead in "Madame Satan" and 
"Jenny Lind." Now working in "Those 
Three French Girls." 

DIETRICH, MARLENE: unmarried; born in 
Berlin, Germany. Write her at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract player. Now 
playing Amy Jolly in "Morocco." 

DIX, RICHARD: unmarried; born in St. Paul, 
Minnesota. Write him at RKO Studio. 
Contract star. Leading role in "Shootii.g 
Straight." Now starring in "Cimarron ." 

DORSAY, FIFI: unmarried; born in Asnierts, 
France. Write her at Fox Studio. Con- 
tract player. Featured role in "They Htd 
to See Paris." Feminine lead in "Hot for 
Paris." Now working in untitled M-G-M 
picture. 

DOVE, BILLY: divorced from Irving Willat; 
born in New York City. Write her at 
North Hollywood, California. Free lance 
player. Starred in "The Night Watch," 
First National. Now taking vacation. 

DOWLING, EDDIE: unmarried ; born in Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. Write him at 
Metropolitan Studios. Sono-Art con- 
tract star. Produced and starred in "The 
Rainbow Man" and "Blaze o' Glory." 

DRESSLER, MARIE: unmarried; born in Co- 
burg, Canada. Write her at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract player. Marthy in 
"Anna Christie." Marie in "Caught 
Short." Now at work in "Dark Star." 

DRESSER, LOUISE: married to Jack Gard- 
ner; born in Evansville, Indiana. Write 
her at Fox Studio. Contract player. 
Featured roles in "Not Quite Decent," 
Fox; "Madonna of Avenue A," Warner 
Brothers. Now playing Will Rogers' wife 
in "LightninV 

DUNCAN, VIVIAN: married to Nils Asther; 
born in Chicago, Illinois. Write her at 
M-G-M Studio. Free lance player. Co- 
starred in "Topsy and Eva," United 
Artists; and "It's a Gay Life" for M-G-M. 
Now taking vacation. 

DUNCAN, ROSETTA: unmarried; born in 
Chicago, Illinois. Write her at M-C-M 
Studio. Free lance player. Co-starred in 
"Topsy and Eva," United Artists; and 
"It's a Gay Life" for M-G-M. Now taking 
a vacation. 

DUNN, JOSEPHINE: unmarried; born in New 
York City. Write her at M-G-M Studio. 
Free lance player. One of "Our Modern 
Maidens," M-G-M. Featured in "China 

(Continued on page 122) 



120 



The Modern Screen Magazine 



MODERN SCREEN Directory 

(Pictures) 



(Continued from page 9) 



OUR BLUSHING BRIDES (M-G-M) — 
Joan Crawford in a story which, 
although it's a little silly, has every- 
thing in it that will make you sit up 
and take notice, including a fashion 
show that will knock both your eyes 
out. Don't fail to see it. 

QUEEN HIGH (Paramount)— A talkie 
version of the famous musical com- 
edy which is a wow. Suggest you go 
right away and see it. 

RAFFLES (United Artists)— Ronald Col- 
man as the suave crook, Kay Francis 
as the girl he loves — both giving ex- 
cellent performances. 

RAIN OR SHINE (Columbia)— Joe Cook 
in a picture that is a world-beater 
for fun. It all takes place in a circus 
and is good for a lot of laughs. Don't 
fail to see it. 

ROMANCE (M-G-M) — Reviewed in this 
issue. 

THE SAP FROM SYRACUSE (Para- 
mount) — Here's our own Jack Oakie 
in a story that will keep you guessing 
until the very end. Oakie's perform- 
ance as Littleton Looney will simply 
have you in stitches. This boy cer- 
tainly is a swell comic. 

THE SEA BAT (M-G-M) — A fairly inter- 
esting story which has as its theme 
a horrible sea creature. 

THE SHADOW OF THE LAW (Para- 
mount) — In this one William Powell 
plays the part of the fellow who is 
innocently accused of the murder. 
This has been done an awful lot but, 
even so, Powell's performance lifts 
it to new heights. 

SHE'S MY WEAKNESS (RKO) — A 
charming story of two young kids in 
love. Acted by Sue Carol and Arthur 
Lake in a charming manner. 

SHOOTING STRAIGHT (RKO) — Rich- 
ard Dix plays the part of the city 
gambler who makes his getaway, 
gets in a railroad wreck, turns up in 
a country town under another name 
and wins the love of the beautiful 
girl — after, of course, quite a few 
complications. Strongly recom- 
mend you to see it. 



SINS OF THE CHILDREN (M-G-M)— 
A sentimental bit of propaganda in 
favor of father, but it's well done. 

SO THIS IS LONDON (Fox)— Will 
Rogers — enough said! Don't miss it. 

SOLDIERS AND WOMEN (Columbia)— 
Grant Withers in a triangle drama 
which has as its setting a United 
States army post. 

SONG O' MY HEART (Fox)— The fa- 
mous singer, John McCormack, 
makes his talkie debut in this film. 
It's just a case of whether you like 
him or not. 

THE STORM (Universal)— Reviewed in 
this issue. 

STRICTLY MODERN (First National)— 
Dorothy Mackaill in a picture which 
is very well suited to her own special 
talents. Better see it. 

SWEET MAMA (First National)— Alice 
White in another cabaret story, with 
David Manners playing the boy she 
loves who gets mixed up with a gang 
of crooks. Good stuff. 

THREE FACES EAST (Warner Brothers) 
■ — Constance Bennett and Eric von 
Stroheim in the famous spy story. 
Well worth a visit. 

UNDER MONTANA SKIES (Tiffany)— 
Kenneth Harlan in a corking 
Western. 

THE UNHOLY THREE (M-G-M) — The 
late Lon Chaney in his last and first 
talkie. 

WAY OUT WEST (M-G-M)— William 
Haines as a city slicker who tries to 
trim the cowboys and gets trimmed 
himself. See it if you're a Haines 
fan. 

WHAT MEN WANT (Universal)— Mod- 
ern youth with Ben Lyon and 
Pauline Starke being the youth. 
If you like stories about the wild 
younger generation, better see it. 

WITH BYRD AT THE SOUTH POLE 
(Paramount) — Commander Byrd's 
famous jaunt to the South Pole 
movie-ized for you and posterity. 
Incidentally, it's worth a visit for 
its own dramatic sake. 



Hollywood After Dark 



(Continued from page 55) 



wood. The place is overrun with trick 
soft drink and sandwich stands. Call- 
ing them stands may get a letter from 
the Chamber of Commerce. They are- 
ornate, multi-colored and attractive. 
They are patterned after wind mills, 
ice cream freezers, oranges, milk bot- 
tles and beer bottles. They are lighted 
up like Coney Island and you can be* 



served without leaving your machine. 

It would never do to close without 
mentioning the two best places to dance 
in Hollywood : The Hotel Roosevelt, 
and the Cocoanut Grove in the Ambas- 
sador. Both of these places are swell. 
Swell orchestras, swell food. 

It is very easy to have a good time 
after the sun goes down in Hollywood. 



LIKE A BIG, BROAD, STRONG 
HAND— on the end of a stick, 



the 




HANDY WRINGER MOP 

is an effective scrubbing mop and 
a smooth wiping mop — in one. 
The entire mop-head lies flat 
on the floor — its larger spread 
providing greater mopping sur- 
face. It wrings easily and thor- 
oughly. Head is easily removed 
and replaced because of handy 
safety-pin clasp which holds both 
ends. It cannot mar or scratch. 

This new and finer mop is sold 
by many department stores and 
chain stores. IF YOUR DEAL- 
ER CANNOT SUPPLY YOL 
SEND 50c FOR KLEEN-O MOP, 
COMPLETE WITH 48" LAC- 
QUERED HANDLE. 

Manufactured and 
guaranteed by 

Gem Hammock & 
Fly Net Co. 

Milwaukee, Wis 





fcijclajh fflcautifier 



Instantly transforms lashes into a 
dark, rich luxuriant fringe of love- 
liness. Lends sparkling bril- 
liance and shadowy, invit- 
l /}jlag depth to the eyes. The 
>^ easiest eyelash beautifier to 
J apply . . . Perfectly harmless. 
Used bythousands.Tryit. Sol- 
id or waterproof Liquid May- 
belline, Black or Brown, 75c 
at all toilet goods counters. 
MAYBELL1NE CO.. CHICAGO 



Do not miss these authors in 
our December Issue 

THYRA SAMTER 
WINSLOW 

ADELE WHITELY 
FLETCHER 

WALTER RAMSEY 

Watch for WYNN, the fa- 
mous astrologer who is going 
to foretell Janet Gaynor's 
future by reading the stars. 
He has foretold many famous 
peoples' futures with uncanny 
results. 



121 




Ben Lyon and Ona Munson show you how it's done in the new picture, 
"The Hot Heiress." Guess you'll want to see it. 



Film G< 



jossip 

{Continued from page 75) 



Everybody was happy — except cer- 
tain dramatic critics who have never 
learned to spell the name correctly — 
nor had the faintest idea what it meant. 



Universal is making a picture called 
"The Cat Creeps." United Artists have 
one called "The Bat Whispers"— both 
mystery — not 200 themes. 



"FIGURE this one out if you can : 
*■ The Hays office considered the title 
"The Command to Love" too risque for 
movie consumption ; so a group of the 
refined boys got together and thought 
up "The Boudior Diplomat" as a sub- 
stitute. Subtle ? 

118 



MOW that Janet Gaynor and Charlie 
^ ^ Farrell are again to be teamed un- 
der the Fox banner, the divorce reports 
concerning Janet and Lydell Peck are 
hot and heavy in the local Newspapers. 

If that mariage ever survives the 
amount of gossip it has inspired since 
Janet and Lydell "stepped off" it will 
be one of the greatest miracles of 
Hollywood. 

It is hard enough for a Hollywood 
marriage to "stick" under the best con- 
ditions — but with the whole world lift- 
ing an eyebrow over Janet and Lydell, 
it must have been hard for them to 
salvage much real happiness from the 
debris. 

Anyway, Lydell doesn't look any too 
happy over on the Paramount lot . . . 
even though he has just been promoted 
to a brand new supervisors job. 



Just as everyone had Phillip Holmes 
well settled with Mary Lawlor, he is 
seen taking Mary Brian places. At least 
he sticks to "Marys" . . . and nice ones, 
too. 

\\7"HAT with all the studios banning 
* * publicity concerning miniature golf 
and forbidding the players to appear, It 
was with a huge snicker that we wit- 
nessed the opening of Mary Pickford's 
own little $15,000.00 course over on 
Wilshire Boulevard. Hollywood had 
a great time that night, too. Just like 
the World's Premier of a picture, with 
the spot lights, stars, onlookers and all. 
It came to light during the evening, that 
several others among the colony are on 
the income side of a Pee Wee Course 
. . . but they asked to be forgotten. 

' Joan Crawford is sporting a new 
[make-up for the street. No pow- 
der; no cheek rouge; gobs of lip 
[rouge and mascara. In place of 
these regularly-accepted cosmet- 
ics, she is now using a sort of oil 
with which she generously 
anoints her skin. Looks swell for 
sports wear . . . not so hot for 
evening. 



A L JOLSON is the first big Amer- 
ican film star to invade Germany 
for the purpose of making an all-talking 
and singing picture entirely in the Ger- 
man language. 

Al has always been a great favorite 
in Germany since the advent of talkies, 
and his visit has been keenly anticipated 
by that country for a long time. Prob- 
ably the most anticipation, however, has 
been on the part of several score leading 
ladies who are all a bib and a tucker 
about the prospect of playing Jolson's 
lead. 

If you are a rabid Jolson fan (and 
who isn't?) you may be worried about 
Al's departure. Not a bit of it. He 
returns the latter part of November to 
start work on "Sons O' Guns" in which 
he will play with Lily Damita. Good 
Luck, Al. 



DEMEMBER Ernest Torrence and 
Tully Marshall in their memorable 
roles in "The Covered Wagon" ? They 
are going to be re-united for the first 
time since that picture. They will play 
the same types in a Paramount special 
called "Fighting Caravans," a Zane 
Grey novel. 

* * * 

JOAN BENNETT is still officially 
*■* keeping her apartment at the fash- 
ionable Chateau Elysee, hut most of her 
time is being spent at the Beverly Hills 
home of her svelte sister, Constance. 
This is quite a blow to the rumor hounds 
who had stirred up and circulated 
stories that the sisters were not exactly 
friendly and were waging a war for 
Bennett supremacy on the screen. 

Constance is quite devoted to Joan's 
small daughter and the three make up 
a very peaceful and devoted family 
group — something rather unusual in the 
Bennett clan. 

(Continued on page 130) 



The Modern Screen Magazi 



ne 



"Am I My Brother's Keeper?" 



(Continued from page 75) 



Her request denied, Loretta, who 
since has travelled nearer to stardom 
than either of the others, departed in 
tears. It is said that Polly Ann, even 
to this day, does not know of Loretta's 
attempt to throw the glory to her. 

Another 1929 Wampus baby star who 
prayed that the award would go to her 
sister instead was little Raquel Torres, 
who rose to fame in "White Shadows 
in the South Seas." 

When Raquel's mother died in Her- 
mosillo, Mexico, the father brought the 
two girls to Hollywood. Then, he, too, 
passed away. Raquel went to work 
as a theater usher in order to support 
her sister. A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
executive noted her beauty, gave her a 
test — and a contract. 

Once before the cameras, she started 
a campaign in behalf of Renee. De- 
spite the fact that the younger girl was 
only an extra, Raquel urged the Wam- 
pus to eliminate her name from the 
nominations and substitute that of 
Renee. 

T UPE VELEZ is another who has 
' found a place for her sister on the 
screen. 

Until three months ago, Josephine 
Velez was a dancer in a Mexico City 
cafe. Lupe sent for her and had her 
registered with Central Casting Bureau. 
Then she went to Director Tay Garnett 
and obtained from him a bit for Jose- 
phine in Pathe's "Her Man." 

HpHREE Hollywood stars who carry 
*■ out the query of the scriptures in a 
big way are Ramon Novarro, Eddie 
Quillan and Marion Davies. 

Ramon's parents were reduced to 
poverty when their land holdings in 
Mexico were taken from them during a 
revolution. 

During his early struggles in Amer- 
ica, when his earnings as a stage dancer 
were small, Ramon hoarded even the 
pennies to feed his father and mother 
and ten brothers and sisters. When he 
finally won recognition in the films, he 
bought a beautiful home and moved the 
family to Hollywood. 

Three of the Novarro girls are now 
in a Spanish convent. The others are 
being educated by Ramon. 

*-pHE parents and eight brothers and 
*■ sisters of Eddie Quillan are sharing 
his success in the cinema. They came 
here upon his insistence when Eddie 
was given his first contract by Mack 
Sennett. 

EVER since Marion Davies reached 
the "big money," she has seen to it 
that her three sisters and the two child- 
ren of one of them have wanted for 
nothing that her gold could buy. Each 
week, allowance checks go forward to 
Ethel Davies, who lives with Marion, 
Renee Davies Lederer and Rosemary 
Davies Van Cleve. She has furnished 
universty educatons for Renee's two 
offspring — Pepi and Charles Lederer. 



' I 'HE attachment of Blanche Sweet 
and Bebe Daniels for their grand- 
mothers is unique in the film colony. 

Blanche's mother died shortly after 
Blanche's birth. When Blanche was 
seven, her father put her in a fashion- 
able boarding school in the East, but 
when she continued to plead with her 
grandmother, Blanche Alexander, to be 
taken away, that worthy literally kid- 
napped the child. 

They have been together ever since, 
and Hollywood seldom sees the younger 
Blanche without Grandma Alexander 
at her side. They share the same home. 

Bebe Daniels was only thirteen when 
she became Harold Lloyd's leading 
lady, but her first pay check went for a 
diamond ring and the down payment on 
a sedan for her mother, Mrs. Phyllis 
Daniels, and a new gown for her grand- 
mother, Mrs. George Griffin. 

Bebe always has insisted that they 
make their home with her, and Mrs. 
Daniels has served as her daughter's 
manager at a big annual salary. 

tpVERYONE knows of the devotion 
of Clara Bow to her father, whom 
she has maintained in luxury ever since 
she became a star. On four different 
occasions she has financed him in busi- 
ness enterprises. 

When Betty Compson reached star- 
dom, she purchased a home in Glendale, 
California, for her mother who had 
worked to give Betty an education. 
Then she established a trust fund for 
the parent, the income from which sup- 
plies the aged woman's every want. 

pVEN when Mabel was Mack Sen- 
nett's only star, and she and her em- 
ployer swept and scrubbed the studio 
after the day's shooting was finished, 
Mabel was sending goodly sums to 
Josephine and her mother who live on 
Staten Island. Later she established a 
trust fund for them. On her deathbed 
she bequeathed them her entire estate. 

"^"O sooner had Jeanette MacDonald, 
*~ ^ Paramount's songstress, landed her- 
self in the movies, than she sent for her 
two sisters, Elsie and Blossom. Blos- 
som had been on the New York stage 
and wanted to continue her career, so 
Jeanette saw to it that she got screen 
roles. Elsie serves as Jeanette's sec- 
retary. 

Marian Nixon and her sister, Linda, 
have been particularly close to each 
other. Several years ago, Marian pur- 
chased for Linda a half interest in a 
gown shop, and has since paid her a 
salary of $250 a month for designing 
and making her wearing apparel. 

Lilyan Tashman remembered her sis- 
ter as soon as she made good in Holly- 
wood. Kitty receives $250 a month as 
Lilyan's secretary and shares the Tash- 
man-Lowe home. 

When Dorothy Jordan was given a 
contract by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, her 
first act was to send for her sister, 
(Continued on page 127) 



• • • no more 
w brittle lashes" 




New Discovery 

Beautifies Lashes 
the Natural Way 

Found : An entirely new way to ac- 
centuate the loveliness of lashes. 
It is the new Liquid Winx with 
its unique "double treatment" 
formula. First it darkens lashes — 
gives them an enticing shadowy 
beauty. Then it softens lashes. 
Even brittle lashes become silky. 
And lashes that have been af- 
fected by ordinary mascaras soon 
regain their natural curliness . . . 
The new Liquid Winx is water- 
proof, can be applied easily and 
gives subtle — smart effects. 

Would you like to try it? Send 
10c for a trial bottle — enough 
for a month's use. 



ROSS CO., Dept. L-1, 243 West 17 St., New York City 
Enclosed is 10c for a bottle of the new Liquid Winx. 



Name 

Address.. 



Black □ Brown □ 



THE NEW 

WINX 



Responsible Mf'r Guarantees New Shirts for 
one that Shrinks or Fades. Selling like Wildri 
Biggest Profits ! Complete line includes Nee! 
wear, Hosiery, Underwear and Jackets. Wri 

Dept. BONDED SHIRT COMPANY 
S 37 81 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 

bee 




PHOTOS 
ENLARGED 



98 



Size 16x20- inches 

Same price for full 
length or bust form, 
groups, landscapes, 
pet animals, etc.. or 
enlargements of any 
part of group pic- 
ture. Safe return of your own 
original photo guaranteed. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Just mail photo or enapshot(any 
size)and within aweeK yon will 
receive your beautiful life-like 
enlargementsizel6x20in.fruar* 
anteed fadeless. Pay postman 
S8cplua postage or send SI. 00 
with order and we pay postage. 

Special Free OfferS 

enlargementwe will send FREE 
a hand-tinted miniature repro- 
duction of photo Bent. Take ad- 
Vantage now of this amazing 
Infer-- send your photo today, 

UNITED PORTRAIT COMPANY 

900 W. Lake St., Dept. p-1310, Chicago, III. 

119 




The Modern Screen Directory (Players) 



"The Golden Calf." Now playing femin- 
ine lead with Amos and Andy in "Check 
and Double Check." 

CARROLL, NANCY; married to Jack Kirkland; 
born in New York City. Write her at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract Star. Hallie 
Hobart in "The Devil's Holiday." Laura 
Moore in "Follow Thru." Now working as 
Peggy Gibson in "Laughter." 

CHANEY, LON: died Thursday, August 30, 
survived by widow, non-professional; born 
in Colorado Springs, Colo. Was M-G-M 
contract star. Last two pictures, "Thun- 
der," (silent) and "The Unholy Three," 
(talkie). At work on "Cheri tBebi," at 
the time of his death, 

CHAPLIN, CHARLES: divorced from Lita 
Grey; born in London, Eng. Write him 
at the Charles Chaplin Studio. Producer- 
star. Last picture was "The Circus." 
Just finishing"City Lights." 

CHATTERTON, RUTH: married to Ralph 
Forbes; born in New York City. Write 
her at Paramount Studio. Contract star. 
Sarah Storm in "Sarah and Son." Fea- 
tured role in "Paramount on Parade." 
Pansy Gray in "Anybody's Woman." 
Now working in "The Right To Love." 

CHEVALIER, MAURICE: married to Yvonne 
Vallee; born in Paris, France. Write him 
at Paramount Studios. Contract star. 
Count Alfred in "The Love Parade." 



{Continued from page y)[ 

Pierre in "The Big Pond." Just completed 
role of Albert in "Playboy of Paris." 

CHURCHILL, MARGUERITE: unmarried; 
born in Kansas City, Missouri. Write her 
at Fox Studio. Contract player. Femi- 
nine leads in "The Diplomat," "The 
Valiant" and "The Big Trail." Now ap- 
pearing in "Good Intentions." 

CLAIRE, BERNICE: unmarried, born in Oak- 
land, California. Write her at First 
National Studio. Contract player. Mary 
Dane in "Numbered Men," Mile. Fifi in 
"The Toast of the Legion," Virginia 
Rollins in "Top Speed." 

COLBERT, CLAUDETTE: married to Norman 
Foster; born in Paris, France. Write her 
at Paramount Studio. Contract player. 
Barbara Billings in "The Big Pond," 
Lydia Thorne in "Manslaughter." Now 
on a world tour. 

COLLIER, WILLIAM JR.: unmarried; born in 
New York City. Write him at Warner 
Brothers Studio. Free lance player. Fea- 
tured role in "Lummox," United Artists; 
and "Hard-boiled Rose," Warner Brothers. 

COLLYER, JUNE: unmarried; born in New 
York City. Write her at Paramount Stu- 
dio. Contract player. Featured role in 
"Sweet Kitty Bellairs," Warner Brothers. 
Patricia Hunter in "A Man From Wyo- 
ming," Paramount. Now playing Mrs. 
Garland in "Extravagance," Tiffany. 




Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., likes his pets to be so big he can't fall over them. 
The Great Dane's name is Hamlet— get it? 



COLMAN, RONALD: separated from London 
actress- wife; born in Surrey, England. 
Write him at Sam Goldwyn Studio. Con- 
tract star. Stellar roles in "Condemned," 
and "Bulldog Drummond." Title role 
in "Raffles." Now making untitled 
picture. 

COMPSON, BETTY: divorced from James 
Cruze; born in Beaver, Utah. Write herat 
RKO Studio. Free lance star. Jane in 
"Inside the Lines," RKO. Sally in "The 
Midnight Mystery," RKO. Now working 
in "The Boudoir Diplomat," Universal. 

COOGAN, JACKIE: unmarried; born in Los 
Angeles, California. Write him at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract player. Now 
staging screen come-back in title role of 
"Tom Sawyer." 

COOPER, GARY: unmarried; born in Helena, 
Montana. Write him at Paramount Stu- 
dio. Contract star. Jim Baker in "A 
Man from Wyoming." Glenister in "The 
Spoilers." Now playing Tom Brown in 
"Morocco." 

CRAWFORD, JOAN: married to Douglas Fair- 
banks, Jr.; born in San Antonio, Texas. 
Write her at M-G-M Studio. Contract 
star. Jerry in "Our Blushing Brides." 
Now at work on "Great Day." 

CODY, LEW: widower; born in Berlin, New 
Hampshire. Write him at Pathe Studio. 
Free lance player. Played opposite Glotia 
Swanson in "What A Widow." Now 
working in "Beyond Victory" for Pathe. 

DAMITA, LILY: unmarried; born in Paris, 
France. Write her at Sam Goldwyn Stu- 
dio. Contract player. Leading roles in 
"The Rescue," Sam Goldwyn; "The 
Bridge of San Luis Rey," M-G-M; and 
"The Cock-Eyed World," Fox. On New 
York stage for last year, but returning 
shortly to the talkies. 

DANIELS, BEBE: married to Ben Lyon; born 
in Dallas, Texas. Write her at RKO. Con- 
tract star. Title roles in "Rio Rita," 
"Dixiana," and "Alias French Gertie." 
Now playing opposite Douglas Fairbanks 
in "Reaching for the Moon" for United 
Artists. 

DELL, CLAUDIA: unmarried; born in San 
Antonio, Texas. Write her at Warner 
Brothers Studio. Contract player. Anna- 
bel in "Big Boy" and Sally in "Sit Tight." 
Now working in "Fifty Million French- 
men." 

DENNY, REGINALD: married to Bubbles 
Steifel; born in London, England. Write 
him at M-G-M Studio. Contract star. 
Male lead in "Madame Satan" and 
"Jenny Lind." Now working in "Those 
Three French Girls." 

DIETRICH, MARLENE: unmarried; born in 
Berlin, Germany. Write her at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract player. Now 
playing Amy Jolly in "Morocco." 

DIX, RICHARD: unmarried; born in St. Paul, 
Minnesota. Write him at RKO Studio. 
Contract star. Leading role in "Shootii.g 
Straight." Now starring in "Cimarron." 

DORSAY, FIFI: unmarried; born in Asnierts, 
France. Write her at Fox Studio. Con- 
tract player. Featured role in "They Ht.d 
to See Paris." Feminine lead in "Hot for 
Paris." Now working in untitled M-G-M 
picture. 

DOVE, BILLY: divorced from Irving Willat; 
born in New York City. Write her at 
North Hollywood, California. Free lance 
player. Starred in "The Night Watch," 
First National. Now taking vacation. 

DOWLING, EDDIE: unmarried ; born in Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. Write him at 
Metropolitan Studios. Sono-Art con- 
tract star. Produced and starred in "The 
Rainbow Man" and "Blaze o' Glory." 

DRESSLER, MARIE: unmarried; born in Co- 
burg, Canada. Write her at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract player. Marthy in 
"Anna Christie." Marie in "Caught 
Short." Now at work in "Dark Star." 

DRESSER, LOUISE: married to Jack Gard- 
ner; born in Evansville, Indiana. Write 
her at Fox Studio. Contract player. 
Featured roles in "Not Quite Decent," 
Fox; "Madonna of Avenue A," Warner 
Brothers. Now playing Will Rogers' wife 
in "LightninV 

DUNCAN, VIVIAN: married to Nils Asther; 
born in Chicago, Illinois. Write her at 
M-G-M Studio. Free lance player. Co- 
starred in "Topsy and Eva," United 
Artists; and "It's a Gay Life" for M-G-M. 
Now taking vacation. 

DUNCAN, ROSETTA: unmarried; born in 
Chicago, Illinois. Write her at M-G-M 
Studio. Free lance player. Co-starred in 
"Topsy and Eva," United Artists; and 
"It's a Gay Life" for M-G-M. Now taking 
a vacation. 

DUNN, JOSEPHINE: unmarried; born in New 
York City. Write her at M-G-M Studio. 
Free lance player. One of "Our Modern 
Maidens," M-G-M. Featured in "China 

{Continued on page 122) 



120 



The Modern Screen Magazine 



MODERN SCREEN Directory 

(Pictures) 



(Continued from page 9) 



OUR BLUSHING BRIDES (M-G-M) — 
Joan Crawford in a story which, 
although it's a little silly, has every- 
thing in it that will make you sit up 
and take notice, including a fashion 
show that will knock both your eyes 
out. Don't fail to see it. 

QUEEN HIGH {Paramount)— A talkie 
version of the famous musical com- 
edy which is a wow. Suggest you go 
right away and see it. 

RAFFLES (United Artists)— Ronald Col- 
man as the suave crook, Kay Francis 
as the girl he loves — both giving ex- 
cellent performances. 

RAIN OR SHINE (Columbia)— J oe Cook 
in a picture that is a world-beater 
for fun. It all takes place in a circus 
and is good for a lot of laughs. Don't 
fail to see it. 

ROMANCE (M-G-M) — Reviewed in this 
issue. 

THE SAP FROM SYRACUSE (Para- 
mount) — Here's our own Jack Oakie 
in a story that will keep you guessing 
until the very end. Oakie's perform- 
ance as Littleton Looney will simply 
have you in stitches. This boy cer- 
tainly is a swell comic. 

THE SEA BAT (M-G-M) — A fairly inter- 
esting story which has as its theme 
a horrible sea creature. 

THE SHADOW OF THE LAW (Para- 
mount) — In this one William Powell 
plays the part of the fellow who is 
innocently accused of the murder. 
This has been done an awful lot but, 
even so, Powell's performance lifts 
it to new heights. 

SHE'S MY WEAKNESS (RKO) — A 
charming story of two young kids in 
love. Acted by Sue Carol and Arthur 
Lake in a charming manner. 

SHOOTING STRAIGHT (RKO)— Rich- 
ard Dix plays the part of the city 
gambler who makes his getaway, 
gets in a railroad wreck, turns up in 
a country town under another name 
and wins the love of the beautiful 
girl — after, of course, quite a few 
complications. Strongly recom- 
mend you to see it. 



SINS OF THE CHILDREN (M-G-M)— 
A sentimental bit of propaganda in 
favor of father, but it's well done. 

SO THIS IS LONDON (Fox)— Will 
Rogers — enough said! Don't miss it. 

SOLDIERS AND WOMEN (Columbia)— 
Grant Withers in a triangle drama 
which has as its setting a United 
States army post. 

SONG O' MY HEART (Fox)— The fa- 
mous singer, John McCormack, 
makes his talkie debut in this film. 
It's just a case of whether you like 
him or not. 

THE STORM (Universal)— Reviewed in 
this issue. 

STRICTLY MODERN (First National)— 
Dorothy Mackaill in a picture which 
is very well suited to her own special 
talents. Better see it. 

SWEET MAMA (First National)— Mice 
White in another cabaret story, with 
David Manners playing the boy she 
loves who gets mixed up with a gang 
of crooks. Good stuff. 

THREE FACES EAST (Warner Brothers) 
— Constance Bennett and Eric von 
Stroheim in the famous spy story. 
Well worth a visit. 

UNDER MONTANA SKIES (Tiffany)— 
Kenneth Harlan in a corking 
Western. 

THE UNHOLY THREE (M-G-M) — The 
late Lon Chaney in his last and first 
talkie. 

WAY OUT WEST (M-G-M) — William 
Haines as a city slicker who tries to 
trim the cowboys and gets trimmed 
himself. See it if you're a Haines 
fan. 

WHAT MEN WANT (Universal)— Mod- 
ern youth with Ben Lyon and 
Pauline Starke being the youth. 
If you like stories about the wild 
younger generation, better see it. 

WITH BYRD AT THE SOUTH POLE 
(Paramount) — Commander Byrd's 
famous jaunt to the South Pole 
movie-ized for you and posterity. 
Incidentally, it's worth a visit for 
its own dramatic sake. 



Hollywood After Dark 



(Continued from page 55) 



wood. The place is overrun with trick 
soft drink and sandwich stands. Call- 
ing them stands may get a letter from 
the Chamber of Commerce. They are- 
ornate, multi-colored and attractive. 
They are patterned after wind mills, 
ice cream freezers, oranges, milk bot- 
tles and beer bottles. They are lighted 
up like Coney Island and you can be* 



served without leaving your machine. 

It would never do to close without 
mentioning the two best places to dance 
in Hollywood : The Hotel Roosevelt, 
and the Cocoanut Grove in the Ambas- 
sador. Both of these places are swell. 
Swell orchestras, swell food. 

It is very easy to have a good time 
after the sun goes down in Hollywood. 



LIKE A BIG, BROAD, STRONG 
HAND— on the end of a stick, 



the 




HANDY WRINGER MOP 

is an effective scrubbing mop and 
a smooth wiping mop — in one. 
The entire mop-head lies flat 
on the floor — its larger spread 
providing greater mopping sur- 
face. It wrings easily and thor- 
oughly. Head is easily removed 
and replaced because of handy 
safety-pin clasp which holds both 
ends. It cannot mar or scratch. 

This new and finer mop is sold 
by many department stores and 
chain stores. IF YOUR DEAL- 
ER CANNOT SUPPLY YOU 
SEND 50c FOR KLEEN-O MOP, 
COMPLETE WITH 48" LAC- 
QUERED HANDLE. 

Manufactured and 
guaranteed by 

Gem Hammock & 
Fly Net Co. 

Milwaukee, Wis 





fcijcltuh oPcauli/icr 

nstantly transforms lashes into a 
ark, rich luxuriant fringe of love- 
liness. Lends sparkling bril- 
I liance and shadowy, invit- 
Ijjing depth to the eyes. The 
1? easiest eyelash beautifier to 
apply . . . Perfectly harmless. 
Used bythousands.Tryit. Sol- 
id or waterproof Liquid May- 
belline, Black or Brown, 75c 
at all toilet goods counters. 
MAYBELLINE CO., CHICAGO 



Do not miss these authors in 
our December Issue 

THYRA SAMTER 
WINSLOW 

ADELE WHITELY 
FLETCHER 

WALTER RAMSEY 

Watch for WYNN, the fa- 
mous astrologer who is going 
to foretell Janet Gaynor's 
future by reading the stars. 
He has foretold many famous 
peoples' futures with uncanny 
results. 



121 



The Modern Screen Directory (Players) 



Bound," M-G-M; "Red Hot Rhythm," 
Pathe; "Melody Lane," Universal. 

DURKIN, JUNIOR: unmarried; born in New 
York City. Write him at Paramount Stu- 
dio. Free lance player. Now playing 
Huckleberry Finn in "Tom Sawyer." 

EDWARDS, CLIFF: divorced; born in Hanni- 
bal, Missouri. Write him at M-G-M Stu- 
dio. Contract player. Comedy roles in 
"Montana Moon," "Good News," and 
"Way Out West." Now working in "Those 
Three French Girls." 

EILERS, SALLY: married to Hoot Gibson; 
born in New York City. Write her at 
Universal Studio. Free lance player. 
Played leads in "Broadway Babies," First 
National; "A Sailor's Holiday," Pathe: 
"Spurs," Universal; "Dough Boys," 
M-G-M. 

ERWJN, STUART: unmarried; born in Squaw 
Valley, California. Write him at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract player. Eustace 
Macy in "Dangerous Nan McGrew. 
Paul in "Playboy of Paris." Oscar in 
"Social Errors," Ambrose in "Along Came 
Youth." . 

FAIRBANKS, DOUGLAS, SR.: married to 
Mary Pickford; born in Denver, Colorado. 
Write him at United Artists Studio. Con- 
tract producer-star. Co-starred with 
Mary in "The Taming of the Shrew. 
Now working in "Reaching for the Moon." 

FAIRBANKS, DOUGLAS, JR: married to 
Joan Crawford; born in New York City. 
Write him at First National Studios. 
Contract player. Billy Bear in "The Way 
of all Men." Douglas Scott in "The Dawn 
Patrol." Now working in "Little Ceasar. 

FARRELL, CHARLES: unmarried; born in 
Walpole, Mass. Write him at Fox Studio. 
Contract star. Now starring in "The 
Princess and the Plumber." Next picture 
to be "Liliom." 

FAZENDA, LOUISE: married to Hal Wallis; 
born in Lafayette, Indiana. Write her at 
First National Studios. Free lance player. 
Hortense in "The Leatherneckers, RKO. 
Aunt Kate in "The Main Street Princess. 

FRANCIS, KAY: unmarried; born in Okla- 
homa City, Okla. Write her at Paramount 
Studio. Contract player. Gwen in 
"Raffes" for Sam Goldwyn. Irene Man- 
ners in "For the Defense," Paramount. 
Now working in "The Virtuous Sin. 

GARBO, GRETA: unmarried; born in Stock- 
holm, Sweden. Write her at M-G-M Stu- 
dio. Contract star. Anna in "Anna 
Christie." Madame Cavallini in Ro- 
mance." Now working in "Red Dust. 

GAYNOR, JANET: married to Lydell Peck; 
born in Philadelphia, Pa. Write her at 
Fox Studio. Contract star. Starred in 
"Seventh Heaven," "Two Girls Wanted, 

1 "Street Angel," "Four Devils," "Chris- 
tina," and "Lucky Star." Still under con- 
tract, but hasn't worked for six months. 

GIBSON, HOOT: married to Sally Eilers; born 
in Tekamah, Neb. Write him at Uni- 
versal Studio. Contract producer-star. 
Starred in "Points West," "The Winged 
Horseman" and "Spurs." 

GILBERT, JOHN: married to Ina Claire; born 
in Logan, Utah. Write him at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract star. Starred in "One 
Glorious Night" and "Redemption. 
Now working in "Way for a Sailor." 

GLEASON, RUSSELL: unmarried; born in 
Portland, Ore. Write him at Pathe Stu- 
dio. Free lance player. Johnny Dale in 
"Officer O'Brien," Pathe. Featured role 
in "All Quiet on the Western Front," 
Universal. Russell in "Beyond Victory," 
Pathe. „ 

GORDON, GAVIN: unmarried; born in Chi- 
cago, 111. Write him at M-G-M Studio. 
Contract player. Tom, the young rector, 
in "Romance." 

GRAVES, RALPH: married to Virginia Good- 
win; born in Cleveland, Ohio. Write him 
at M-G-M Studio. Contract player- 
writer. Featured in "The Flying Fleet," 
M-G-M. "Submarine" and "Flight" for 
Columbia. 

GRAY, ALEXANDER: unmarried; born in 
Wrightsville, Pa. Write him at First 
National Studio. Free lance player. Fea- 
tured role in "Song of the Flame" for 
First National. 

GRAY, LAWRENCE: unmarried; born in San 
Francisco, Cal. Write him at M-G-M 
Studio, Contract player. Lead oppo- 
site Marion Davies in "Marianne" and 
"The Floradora Girl." 

GREEN, HARRY: divorced from Mabel Hurst; 
born in New York City. Write him at 
Paramount Studio. Contract player. 
Solomon Bimberg in "True to the Navy." 
Herman in "The Spoilers." Now playing 
Gabriel Graboswki in "Sea Legs," Jack 
Oakie's starring picture. 

GREEN, MITZI: unmarried; born in New 
York City. Write her at Paramount Stu- 
dio. Contract player. Featured in 
"Paramount on Parade." Penelope in 
"Love Among the Millionaires." Now 



{Continued from page 120) 

working as Becky Thatcher in "Tom 
Sawyer." 

GRIFFITH, CORINNE: married to Walter 
Morosco. Born in Texarkana, Ark. Write 
her at Malibu Beach. Free lance star. 
Stellar roles in "The Divine Lady," "Out- 
cast," "Prisoners," and "Saturday's 
Children." Now enjoying a year's vaca- 
tion. 

HAINES, WILLIAM: unmarried; born in 
Staunton, Virginia. Write him at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract star. Windy in "Way 
Out West." Now working in "Remote 
Control." 

HALL, JAMES: divorced; born in Dallas, 
Texas. Write him at Warner Brothers 
Studio. Contract player. Tommy in 
"Maybe It's Love." George in "Divorce 
Among Friends." 

HAMILTON, NEIL: married to Elsa Whitner; 
born in Lynn, Mass. Write him at Malibu 
Beach. Free lance player. Major Brand 
in "The Dawn Patrol." Doctor Petrie in 
"The Return of Dr. Fu Manchu." Alice 
White's leading man in "The Chicago 
Widow." Now working in "The Cat 
Creeps," Universal. 

HARDING, ANN: married to Harry Bannister; 
born in Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, 
Texas. Write her at Paramount. Con- 
tract star. Vera Kessler in "Her Private 
Affair." Linda Seton in "Holiday." 




Lita La Roy turns the clock back to the 
days when the actors helped out with 
the props. Look out for that 
finger, you may need it. 



making 



HARDY, OLIVER: divorced; born in Atlanta, 
Ga. Write him at Hal Roach Studio. 
Contract star. Co-starred in "The Brat." 
Now working in "The Rap," Roach pic- 
tures. 

HEGGIE.O. P.: unmarried; born in Angaston, 
South Australia. Write him at Para- 
mount Studio. Free lance player. King 
Louis XI in "The Vagabond King," Para- 
mount. Father Benedict in "The Swan," 
United Artists. 

HOLMES, PHILLIPS: unmarried; born in 
Grand Rapids, Michigan. Write him at 
Paramount Studio. Contract player. 
David Stone in "The Devil's Holiday" and 
Ernst Heron in "Grumpy" for Para- 
mount. Now working in "Barber John's 
Boy" at Warner Brothers. 

HOLT, JACK: married to non-prof essional ; 
born in Virginia. Write him at Columbia 
Studio. Contract star. Starred in 
"Flight," and "Submarine." Now work- 
ing in "Dirigible," all Columbia pictures. 

HUGHES, LLOYD: married to Gloria Hope; 
born in Bisbee, Arizona. Write him at 
RKO Studio. Free lance player. Male 
lead opposite Bebe Daniels in "When 
Love Comes Along." 

HUSTON, WALTER: separated from wife but 



not divorced; born in Toronto, Canada. 
Write him at First National Studio. Free 
lance player. Featured role in "The 
Virginian," Paramount. Title role in 
"Abraham Lincoln," United Artists. 
Lopez in "The Bad Man," First National. 
Now working in leading role in "The 
Virtuous Sin," Paramount. 
HYAMS, LEILA: married to Phil Berg; born 
in New York City. Write her at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract player. Feminine leads 
in "Way Out West," and "Way For a 
Sailor." Now working in "The Passion 
Flower." 

JANNEY, WILLIAM: unmarried; born in New 
York City. Write him at RKO. Free 
lance player. Juvenile lead in "Salute," 
Fox. Young brother in "Coquette," 
United Artists. Gordon Scott in "The 
Dawn Patrol," First National. Tommy 
Powell in "Shooting Straight." Now 
working as Tommy Brown in "Crime," 
for RKO 

JOHNSON, KAY: married to John Cromwell; 
born in Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Write her at 
M-G-M Studio. Contract player. Femi- 
nine lead in "Billy The Kid," M-G-M, 
"The Spoilers," for Paramount, and 
"Madame Satan," M-G-M. 

JOLSON, AL: married to Ruby Keeler; born 
in St. Petersburg, Russia. Write him at 
United Artists Studio. Contract star. 
Stellar roles in "The Jazz Singer," "The 
Singing Fool," "Say It With Songs," 
"Mammy," and "Big Boy," Warner 
Brothers. 

JORDAN, DOROTHY: unmarried; born in 
Clarksburg, Tenn. Write her at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract player. Feminine leads 
in "Devil May Care," "In Gay Madrid," 
"Call of the Flesh" and "Love in the 
Rough," M-G-M. Now at work in "Dark 
Star." 

KEATON, BUSTER: married to Natalie Tal- 
madge; born in Pick way, Kansas. Write 
him at M-G-M Studio. Contract star. 
Stellar role in "Free and Easy" and 
"Dough Boys." Now in Europe on a 
vacation. 

KENT, BARBARA: unmarried: born in Gads- 
bury, Alberta, Canada. Write her at Uni- 
versal Studio. Contract player. Juvenile 
lead in "What Men Want," Universal; 
"Feet First," Harold Lloyd Corporation. 
Will be Lloyd's feminine lead in his next 
picture. 

KANE, HELEN: unmarried; born in New 
York City. Write her at Paramount Stu- 
dio. Contract star. Nan McGrew in 
"Dangerous Nan McGrew," Helen Frey in 
"Sweetie." Now working in "Heads Up" 
at Paramount's Long Island Studio. 

KIRKWOOD, JAMES: divorced from Lila Lee: 
born in North Dakota. Write him at 
Warner Brothers Studio. Free lance 
player. Featured roles in "Someone to 
Love," Paramount; "The Time, the 
Place and the Girl," Warner Brothers; 
Mark Stone in "The Devil's Holiday." 

LAKE, ARTHUR: unmarried; born in Corbin, 
Kentucky Write him at RKO Studio. 
Contract player. Starred in "Tanned 
Legs," "Dance Hall," and "She's My 
Weakness Now," all RKO. Now working 
in "Bunker Bean," RKO. 

LANE, LOLA: unmarried; born in Boston, 
Mass. Write her at James Cruze Studio. 
Contract star. Feminine lead in "The 
Big Fight." Vacationing at Santa Monica 
beach and waiting for next Cruze pro- 
duction. 

LA PL ANTE, LAURA: married to William 
Sieter; born in St. Louis, Mo. Write her 
at Universal Studio. Free lance star. 
Stellar roles in "Thanks for the Buggy 
Ride," "Show Boat," "Scandal," "The 
Last Warning," and "The Captain of the 
Guard," all for Universal. 

LAUREL, STAN: married to non-professional; 
born in London, England. Write him at 
Hal Roach Studio. Contract star. Co- 
starred with Oliver Hardy in "The Brat." 
Now working on "The Rap," both for 
Hal Roach. 

LEE, DOROTHY: unmarried; born in Los 
Angeles, Calif Write her at RKO Studio. 
Contract player. Juvenile lead in "The 
Cuckoos." Juvenile lead in "Rio Rita." 
Featured role in "Dixiana." Now working 
as juvenile lead in "Half Shot at Sunrise." 
All RKO 

LEE, LILA: divorced from James Kirkwood. 

Born in New York City. Write her at 

First National Studio. Contract player. 

Judith Temple in "Woman Hungry." 

Princess Ellen in "The Queen on Main 

Street." Feminine lead in "The Gorilla." 

Rosie in "The Unholy Three." Now in a 

sanitarium in Arizona. 
LEWIS, GEORGE: married to Mary Lou Loh- 

man; born in Mexico City. Write him at 

Universal Studio. Free lance player. 

Feature roles in "College Love" and "Kinjj 

(Continued on page 124) 



122 



The Modern Screen Magazine 



The New "It" 



(Continued from page 17) 

what the eye sees. Their voices have 
rung the death knell of many former 
favorites, but the sixth sense of the pro- 
ducers copes with this, and they import 
new artists or train old ones, all in the 
new vein, so as to minister to men's 
present needs. 

A lesson is a lesson and teaches a 
child or man, if properly administered. 
And it would seem that the public and 
the producers have been really clever 
pupils. The public is now awake to 
reality and is demanding pictures of 
life of any class — not only criminal or 
back-stage — so long as they are true 
pictures containing dialogue which rings 
true and is interesting. 

TV/TALES are demanding women who, 
1 however young they may be, do 
not demonstrate eternal immaturity, but 
who allow soul to be felt as an inspira- 
tion, the mind to be enjoyed as a stim- 
ulant, and the body to be worshipped 
because it represents the perfect sweet- 
heart type, the perfect wife type, and 
blends all in what could, in the future, 
be divine motherhood. This is my con- 
ception of the new "IT." 

I take my hat off to the producers 
who sense men's minds, and materialize 
upon the screen the types which satisfy 
their desires of the moment. 



ANOTHER INTERESTING 
FEATURE BY MADAME 
ELINOR CLYN WILL 
APPEAR IN AN EARLY 
ISSUE OF THE MODERN 
SCREEN MAGAZINE 



The Big 8 

(Continued from page 32) 

in the motion picture business. 

Middle-aged men are in demand as 
extras and James Kilgannon, nearly 
forty, is third among the men. He 
plays bits and has been a barkeeper, a 
gunman and a sideshow barker in a 
number of pictures. He was four years 
in burlesque, an experience which came 
in the middle of his motion picture 
work. He has been in and out of the 
movies as long as he can remember. 

PREDERICK LEE played on the 
stage with James K. Hackett for 
three years. He tackled the movies two 
years ago. He is a graduate of the 
University of Michigan and in his 
spare time writes for newspapers and 
magazines. He is forty-one years old 
and can well pass as the President of 
the United Dingus Mfg. Co., Inc. 
There they are — The Big Eight. 



LOOK 



/ 




WHEREVER 

YOU SEE THIS 

NATIONALLY POPULAR 

MDKNT" 

TRADEMARK DESIGN 



YOU WILL KNOW 
THE MERCHANDISE 
WILL PLEASE YOU 




OIL or DUST MOPS 



FURNITURE POLISH 



AUTOMOBILE POLISH 



POLISHING WAX 



MACHINE OIL 



STOVE POLISH 



METAL POLISH 



DRY CLEANING FLUID 



and Other Household Needs 

Midway Chemical Co. 



IT IS THE ABSOLUTE 
GUARANTEE OF THE 

Makers of the famous "FLYded" Insect Spray and "RIDZ" Moth Cake 



3650 JASPER STREET 
CHICAGO 



DON'T FAIL TO READ ADELE WHITELY FLETCHERS ARTICLE 
ON HAIRDRESSING IN OUR NEXT ISSUE. 

Half a Million People 

have learned music this easy way 

You, too, Can Learn to Play Your 
Favorite Instrument Without a 
Teacher 

Easy as A"B*C 

ly/TANY of this half million 

iVl didn t know one note from 
another — yet in half the usual time 
they learned to play their favorite instru- 
ment. Best of all they found learning 
music amazingly easy. No monotonous 
hours of exercises — no tedious scales— no ex- 
pensive teachers. This simplified method, per- 
fected by the U. S. School of Music, made learn- 
ing music as easy as A-B-CI 

From the very start you are playing real tunes 
perfectly, by note. Every step, from beginning to 
end, is right before your eyes in print and picture. 
First you aie told how to do a thing, then a picture 
shows you how, then you do it yourself and hear 
it. And almost before you know it, you are playing 
your favorite pieces — jazz, ballads, classics. No 
private teacher could make it clearer. The cost is 
surprisingly low — averaging only a few cents a day 
— and the price is the same for whatever instru- 
ment you choose. 

Learn now to play 
your favorite instru- 
ment and surprise all 
your friends. Change 
from a wall-flower to 
the center of attraction. 
Musicians are invited 
everywhere. Enjoy the 
popularity you have 




LEARN 


TO PLAY 


BY 


NOTE 


Mandolin Saxophone 


Piano 


'Cello 


Organ 


Ukulele 


Violin 


Cornet 


Banjo 


Trombone 


Or Any 


Other In- 


strument 



FREE BOOKLET AND 
DEMONSTRATION 
LESSON 

If you really do want to 
play your favorite instru- 
ment, fill out and mail the coupon asking for 
our Free Booklet and Free Demonstration Les- 
son. These explain our wonderful method fully 
and show you how easily and quickly you can 
learn to play at little expense. Instruments are 
supplied when needed — cash or credit. U. S. 
School of Music, 14411 Brunswick Bldg., New 
York City. 

U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC, 

14411 Brunswick Bldg., New York City 

Send me your amazing free book, "Music Lessons tn 
Your Own Home," with introduction by Dr. Frank 
Crane; also Free Demonstration Lesson. This does not 
put me under any obligation. 



Name. 



Address. 



Have you 

Instrument this Inst.?- 



123 




Sue Carol likes all kinds of sports— and proves it by being ready 
for each and every one. 

The Modern Screen Directory 

(Players) 

{Continued from page 122) 



of the Campus," both for Universal. 

LIGHTNER, WINNIE: married to George 
Holtrey; born at Greenport, Long Island. 
Write her at Warner Brothers Studio. 
Contract player. Toots in "Hold Every- 
thing." Flo in "The Life of the Party." 
Winnie in "Sit Tight." 

LIVINGSTON, MARGARET: unmarried; born 
in Salt Lake City, Utah. Write her at 
Columbia Studio. Free lance player. 
Featured roles in "The Canary Murder 
Case," Pathe's "Official Scandal," Para- 
mount's "Innocents of Paris," and Uni- 
versale "The Last Warning." 

LLOYD, HAROLD: married to Mildred Davis; 
born in Burchard, Nebraska. Write him 
at Metropolitan Studio. Producer-star. 
Stellar roles in "The Freshman," "For 
Heaven's Sake," and "Speedy" and "Wel- 
come Danger." Just finished "Feet First," 
all released by Paramount. Now writing 
a football story. 

LOFF, JEANETTE: divorced; born in Orifino, 
Idaho. Write her at Universal Studio. 
Contract player. Featured in "The King 
of Jazz." Now working as Greta in "The 
Boudoir Diplomat." 

LOVE, BESSIE: married to William Hawks; 
born in Midland, Texas. Write her at 
M-G-M Studio. Contract player. Femi- 
nine lead in "Good News," M-G-M. 
Feminine lead in "The Conspiracy" 
for RKO. 



LOWE, EDMUND: married to Lilyan Tash- 
man; born in San Jose, Calif. Write him 
at Fox Studio. Contract player. Louis 
Beretti in "Born Reckless," Sergeant 
Quirt in "The Cock-Eyed World." jerry 
in "The Bad One." David Cresson in 
"Good Intentions." Now being starred 
in "Scotland Yard" in which he plays 
a dual role. 

LOY, MYRNA: unmarried; born in Helena, 
Montana. Write her at Warner Brothers 
Studio. Free lance player. 

LANE, LUPINO: married to Violet Blythe; 
born in London, England. Write him at 
Educational Studios. Free lance star. 
Featured comedian in "The Love Parade," 
Paramount. Now starring in stage revue 
in London. 

LUKAS, PAUL: married to a non-professional ; 
born in Budapest, Hungary. Berci in 
"Grumpy." Gustave Saxon in "Any- 
body's Woman." Now working in a fea- 
tured role of "Ladies' Man." 

LYNN, SHARON: unmarried; born at 
Weatherford, Texas. Write her at Fox 
Studio. Contract player. Feminine 
lead in "Salute," "The One Woman 
Idea," "The Vamp," all Fox. Now play- 
ing in "Lightnin'." 

LYON, BEN: married to Bebe Daniels; born in 
Atlanta, Ga. Write him at Warner Broth- 
ers Studio. Contract star. Stellar role in 
"Hell's Angels," Caddo Company. Male 



lead in "What Men Want," Universal. Just 
returned to Hollywood from New York, 
where he made personal appearance at 
premiere of "Hell's Angels." 

LA ROCOUE, ROD: married to Vilma Banky; 
born in Chicago, 111. Write him at Sam 
Goldwyn Studio. Free lance player Title 
role in "Beau Bandit," RKO. Now in 
Hungary, visiting his wife's parents. 

LEBEDEFF, IVAN: unmarried; born in 
Uspoliai, Lithuania. Write him at RKO. 
Contract player. Butch Miller in "The 
Conspiracy." Mischa in "The Midnight 
Mystery." 

LEE, GWEN: unmarried; born in Hastings, 
Neb. Write her at M-G-M Studio. Con- 
tract player. Featured roles in "Our 
Blushing Brides," "Caught Short, ""Lady 
of Chance," all M-G-M. Now vaca- 
tioning. 

LOMBARD, CAROL: unmarried; born in 
Fort Wayne, Ind. Write her at Pathe 
Studio. Free lance player. Feminine 
lead in "The Racketeer," Pathe. Fea- 
tured role in "Safety in Numbers," Para- 
mount. 

LYTELL, BERT: married to Grace Menken, 
stage actress; born in Newark, N. J. 
Write him at Columbia Studio. Contract 
star. Title role in "The Lone Wolf." 
Now playing dual role in "Brothers." 

MACDONALD, JEANETTE: unmarried; born 
in Philadelphia, Pa. Write her at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract player. Joan 
Wood in "Let's Go Native." Title role in 
"Bride 66," for United Artists. Now play- 
ing Helene Mara in "Monte Carlo." 

MACKAILL, DOROTHY: divorced; born in 
Hull, England. Write her at Warner 
Brothers Studio. Free lance player. Fea- 
tured roles in "His Captive Woman," 
"The Love Racket," First National. Now 
in Europe with her mother for six months' 
vacation. 

MCKENNA, KENNETH: unmarried; born in 
New York City. Write him at Fox Studio. 
Featured role in "Men Without Women," 

Fox. 

MARCH, FREDRIC: married to Florence Eld- 
ridge. Born in Racine, Wis. Write him 
at Paramount Studio. Contract player. 
Gunner McCoy in "True to the Navy." 
Dan O'Bannon in "Manslaughter." Now 
playing Paul Lockridge in "Laughter." 

MARIS, MONA: unmarried; born in Buenos 
Aires. Write her at Fox Studio. Contract 
player. Leading feminine role in "The 
Arizona Kid" and "Sez You, Sez Me," 
both Fox. 

MARSHALL, EVERETT: unmarried; born in 
Lawrence, Mass. Write him at RKO 
Studio. Contract star. Carl Van Horn in 
"Dixiana." Now starring in "Babes in 
Toyland" 

MASON, SHIRLEY: married. Operating 
beauty parlor in Hollywood. Hasn't 
worked in pictures for six months. Still 
managing the beauty shop. 

MANNERS, DAVID: married to Suzanne 
Bushnell; born in Halifax, Nova Scotia. 
Write him at F'irst National Studio. 
Contract player. Richard Dane in "The 
Truth About Youth." Caliph Abdallah 
in "Kismet." Now working in featured 
role in "Mother's Cry." All First Na- 
tional. 

MILJAN, JOHN: married to the former Mrs. 
Creighton Hale; born in Leeds, South 
Dakota. Contract player. Write him at 
M-G-M Studio. Featured role in "Our 
Blushing Brides," prosecuting attorney 
in "The Unholy Three." Now working in 
"Remote Control." All M-G-M. 

MERCER, BERYL: divorced from Stuart 
Holmes; born in Madrid, Spain. Write 
her at Warner Brothers Studio. Free 
lance player. Mother in" Common Clay," 
Fox. Mary Jones in "Outward Bound," 
Fox. 

MCLAGLEN, VICTOR: married to non- 
professional. Born in London, England. 
Write him at Fox Studio. Contract star. 
Starred in "Hot for Paris." Co-starred 
in "Painted Women." Now featured in 
"Women of Nations." 

MILLER, MARILYN: divorced from Jack 
Pickford; born in Evansville, Ind. Write 
her at First National Studio. Contract 
star. Sally in "Sally." Now working on 
"Sunny." 

MONTGOMERY, ROBERT: married to non- 
professional. Born in Beacon, N. Y. 
Write him at M-G-M Studio. Contract 
player. Kelly in "Love in the Rough." 
Featured role in "The Big House." Fea- 
tured role in "Our Blushing Brides." 
Now at work in "War Nurse." 

MOORE, MATT: unmarried; born in County 
Meath, Ireland. Write him at United 
Artists Studio. Free lance player. Fea- 
tured roles in "Coquette," United Artists. 
"Side Street," RKO. Now vacationing. 

MOORE, OWEN: divorced from Mary Pick- 
ford; born in County Meath, Ireland. 
Write him at United Artists Studio. Free 
lance player. Featured roles in "Go 
Straight," "The Parasite," and "Mar- 
ried." On vacation at Santa Monica. 

MOORE, TOM: unmarried; born in County 
Meath, Ireland. Write him at Hollywood, 
Calif. Free lance player. Featured roles 
in "Harbor Lights," and "Pretty Ladies." 

{Continued on page 126) 



124 



T 



he Modern Screen Magazine 



Vfow I MADE UP for JOHN'S 

Shritnhen E^ST 

CHECK 




How a little Home Business 
Brought Independence 



Goodbye, Lon 

(Continued from page 39) 

quent producers have gladly paid this 
additional sum to procure the services 
of so able an actor. 

It is a well known fact by now that 
Lon wrote the section devoted to make- 
up in the Encyclopedia Brittanica be- 
sides the preface to a book on that 
subject. 

Lon refused to "go Hollywood," liv- 
ing quietly, far removed from the so- 
cial activities of the film capital. 

Few of his close friends were mem- 
bers of his profession. 

He was the most aloof and yet the 
most democratic of all of his contem- 
poraries. 

Never before has there been any 
Hollywood figure who so frankly and 
fearlessly realized his own limitations, 
the demands and inconstancies of his 
admirers, the dangers of his profession. 
He was always alert, always eager to 
banish affectation, always hoping to 
find one more new and thrilling way 
to fascinate the countless throng who 
admired him then and mourn him now. 

npHE unmade "Cheri Bebi" shall be 
the symbol of futile regret and dis- 
appointment. This picture was to have 
shown the world a new and amazing 
Lon Chaney. 

Fighting the disadvantages of a man 
of mystery who spoke, Lon Chaney was 
planning to surmount the handicaps of 
his failing voice, caused by a diseased 
throat, and present his insatiable public 
with new evidence of his talents. 

". . . Express grief for thy dead in 
silence like to death. . . ." 

DUT the deserved "silence like to 
death" can be broken by these few 
words of eager and reverent admiration 
and respect. 

And, at least, we can all express for 
this last time our gratitude for the 
hours of amusement and pleasure of- 
fered us by this unique figure in the 
screen world. 

"We are sorry you had to leave us. 
Good bye, Lon." 

— The Editor. 



Garbo's Hiding 
I Place 

(Continued from page 29) 

adament. Mary Pickford, a close friend 
of the Mountbattens, appealed to her. 

"I think I should have a more enjoy- 
able time at home," was Greta's reply 
over the phone. 

lV/fONEY, time and pleasure — even 
■*• comfort — have been sacrificed by 
this imported star in her efforts to 
maintain her absolute seclusion. 



"They've cut our piece rate again," John said 
bitterly as he gloomily ate his supper. "I've been 
working at top speed and then only making a bare 
living, but now — " 

It has been hard enough before, but now — with 
John's pay check even smaller — I feared it would 
be impossible to make ends meet. 

Idly I fingered thru the pages of a magazine 
and saw an advertisement telling how women 
at home were making $15.00 to $50.00 a week 
supplying Brown Bobby greaseless doughnuts. 

"Why can't you do the same?" I asked my- 
self. "Why can't you do what others have done? 
Investigate!" I did. In a few days I received 
details of the Brown Bobby plan. It seemed too 
good to be true because it showed how I, without 
neglecting my housework or little Jimmy, could 
easily make money. 

Well, to make the story short, I went into 
the business without telling John. I passed 
out sample Brown Bobbys to my friends, gave 
out a few samples around restaurants, lined up 
a couple grocery stores. In my first week I sold 
238 dozen Brown Bobbys at an average profit of 
15c a dozen. 

When John brought home his next pay check, 
he threw it down on the table and said gloomily. 
"I'm sorry, honey, but it's the best I can do." 



"It's not the best you can do, darling," and 
I almost cried when I told him of the money 
I had made selling Brown Bobbys. It was the 
happiest moment in my life. 

Inside of three weeks John quit his job at the 
factory to devote all Wis time to Brown Bobbys. 
Now we are dissatisfied at less than $150.00 a 
week. 

Women interested in making $15.00 to $50.00 
in their spare time are invited to write for details 
of the Brown Bobby plan to Food Display Machine 
Corp., Dept. 6411, Chicago, 111. 

| Food Display Machine Corp., 

| Dept. 6411, 500-51: N. Dearborn St., Chicago. III. 

I Without cost send me details of your Brown 
| Bobby Plan. 

I 

I Name 

I 

' Address 

I f 

I 



AMAZING-PHOTOS ENLARGED 




reproduced from any clear photograph, tintype 
or snapshot you mail us. No photo too large nor 
any snapshot too small. We guarantee return of 
your original photograph. 

Send as many photos as you wish at 
this bargain price 



Size 8XIO or IIxl4 in. 

Only - — 

49 

■ W each 



Send No Money 

your name and address, and in about 



the photo, with / 



Dept. 10 
344 Waller Ave., 
Chicago, III. 



Check Size 
Wanted 

□ 11x14 in. 

□ 8x10 in. 



h enlargement. (If 00c cash for each enlarge 
t ia enclosed with hia order, we pay pontage.) 



week you will receive a beautiful en- / plM „ 8end .... enlargements from encored 

largement that will never fade. We will / photo. I win pay postman 490 plus postage for 
also send with the enlargement an / 
illustrated circular describing sev- / 
eral of our most popular frames. / 
From this circular you can choose ' 
the frame which we are giving 
FREE with every enlargement f 

ordered in colors. / Town state 



Name. 

/ 

Addrcsa- 




WmmlMaMmajQaick 



Given You To 
Decorate! 



In Your Own Home! 

An easy, pleasant, dig- 
nified way ! No canvass- 
ing, no soliciting. No 
previous training need- 
ed. No tedious study nor 
memorizing. Decorate 
lovely giftwares in your 
spare moments. WE 
SHOW YOU HOW. 
With Monsieur Petit's 
Secret of Three Simple 
Steps you can start at 
once, for fine cash in- 
come. We g u a r a n tee 
your success. We want 
women in every com- 
munity. Be the first ! 



Begin Right Away! 

We send you BIG COM- 
PLETE GENEROUS KIT 
WITHOUT EXTRA COST. 
Thousands of women, many 
prominent socially, are happy 
in this delightful pastime — 
making from hundreds to 
thousands of doI-»«i«™™ 
lars. An easy way to J 

bring in money of J FIRESIDE INDUSTRIES, 
your own. No inter- ■ Dept. 147-S, Adrian, Mich. 




ference with other I 
work or duties. I 

.FREE!* 



Send me Free Book. This does 
■ not put me under any obligation. 



Beautiful Fireside , Name ■• 
book showing giftwares in ■ 
full colors. Explains every- I 
thing. Fill in and mail cou- ■ AHrlrpjw 
pon. Noobligation. Act now! ; aggress 



125 



The Modern Screen Directory (Players) 



MORENO, ANTONIO: married to Daisy Can- 
field; born in Madrid, Spain. Write him 
at M-G-M Studio. Contract player- 
director. Featured roles in "Careers," 
"Synthetic Sin," First National. Now 
directing Spanish versions of M-G-M 
pictures. 

MORAN, * LOIS: unmarried; born in Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. Write her at Fox Studio. 
Contract star. Stellar role in "True 
Heaven." Now starring in "The Play 
Called Life." Next picture titled 
"Blondes," all for Fox. 

MORAN, POLLY: unmarried; born in Chi- 
cago, 111. Write her at M-G-M Studio. 
Contract player. Polly in "Caught 
Short." Pansy in "Way Out West." Now 
working as featured player in "Remote 
Control." 

MULHALL, JACK: married to Evelyn Winana; 
born in Wappinger's Falls, N. Y. Write 
him at RKO Studio. Contract player. 
Johnny Quinlan in "The Fall Guy." 

MUNI, PAUL: married to Bella Finckle, pro- 
fessional; born in Vienna, Austria. Write 
him at Fox Studio. Free lance player. 
Featured roles in "The Valiant," and 
"Seven Faces," for Fox. 

MURRAY, CHARLES: married; born in Ire- 
land. Write him at First National Studio. 
Now working in "The Cohens and the 
Kellys in Ireland," Universal. 

MURRAY, J. HAROLD: married to a non- 
professional; born in South Berwick, 
Maine. Write him at Fox Studio. Con- 
tract player. Featured roles in "Tonight 
and You," and "Women Everywhere." 
Now working in "Stolen Thunder." All 
for Fox. 

NAGEL, CONRAD: married, to Ruth Helms. 
Born in Keokuk, Iowa. Write him at 
M-G-M Studio. Contract player. Co- 
starred in "Dynamite." Featured role in 
"The Divorcee," M-G-M. Featured in 
"Right of Way," for First National. 

NIXON, MARIAN: married to Edward Hill- 
man, non-professional; born in Superior, 
Wisconsin. Write her at Warner Brothers 
Studio. Contract player. Muriel in 
"Courage." Leading role in "Adios.' 
Title role of "College Widow." Now 
working in "The Egg Crate Wallop." 

NOLAN, MARY: unmarried; born on farm 
outside of Louisville, Ky. Write her at 
Universal Studio. Contract star. Starred 
in "Young Desire," and "Outside the 
Law," Universal. Now working in "Ex- 
Mistress," Warner Brothers. 

NORTON, BARRY: unmarried; born in 
Buenos Aires. Write him at Paramount 
Studio Contract player. Starred in 



{Continued from page 124) 

Spanish version of "The Benson Murder 

Case." 

NOVARRO, RAMON: unmarried; born in 
Durango, Mexico. Write him at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract star. Stellar roles in 
"Devil May Care," and "In Gay Madrid." 
Just finished "Call of the Flesh." 

NUGENT, EDDIE: married to non-profes- 
sional. Born in New York City. Write 
him at M-G-M Studio. Contract player. 
Featured role in "Father and Son." Now 
playing featured role in "Remote Con- 
trol," M-G-M. 

NUGENT, ELLIOT: unmarried; born in New 
York City. Write him at M-G-M Studio. 
Contract player. Featured roles in 
"Father and Son," and "The Unholy 
Three." Both M-G-M. 

OAKIE, JACK: unmarried; born in Sedalia, 
Missouri. Write him at Paramount Stu- 
dio. Contract player. Marco Perkins in 
"The Social Lion." Littleton Looney in 
"The Sap from Syracuse." Now working 
as Searchlight Doyle O'Brien in "Sea 
Legs." 

OLAND, WARNER: married to Edith Shearn, 
professional; born in Ymea, Sweden. 
Write him at Paramount Studio. Free 
lance player. Title role in "The Myste- 
rious Dr. Fu Manchu" and "The Studio 
Murder Case," and "The Return of Dr. 
Fu Manchu." 

OWEN, CATHERINE DALE: unmarried; born 
in Louisville, Ky. Write her at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract player. Feminine leads 
in "The Forbidden Woman," "One 
Glorious Night," "The Rogue Song," and 
"The Circle," all for M-G-M. 

O'BRIEN, GEORGE: unmarried; born in San 
Francisco. Write him at Fox Studio. 
Contract star. Stellar roles in "The Last 
of the Duanes," and "Rough Romance." 
Now doing stellar role in "Fair Warning," 
all for Fox. 

O SULLIVAN, MAUREEN: unmarried; born 
in Dublin, Ireland. Write her at Fox 
Studio. Contract player. Feminine 
juvenile lead in "Song O' My Heart" and 
"So This Is London." Now working as 
feminine lead in "Just Imagine." 

PAGE, ANITA: unmarried; born in Flushing, 
Long Island. Write her at M-G-M Stu- 
dio. Contract player. Featured roles in 
"Our Blushing Brides" and "Caught 
Short." Now working in "War Nurse." 

PHILBIN, MARY: unmarried. Born in Chi- 
cago, 111. Write her at Universal Studio. 
Free-lance player. Feminine lead in 
"Fifth Avenue Models," "The Man Who 
Laughs," "The Port of Dreams," "Girl- 
Overboard," all Universal. 




Believe it or not, this wire-haired terrier of Bob Armstrong's responds 
to the cute name of Huckleberry Fin. 

126 



PICKFORD, MARY: married to Douglas 
Fairbanks; born in Toronto, Canada. 
Write her at United Artists. Producer- 
star. Title role in "Coquette." Co- 
starred with Fairbanks in "The Taming 
of the Shrew." 

PICKFORD, JACK: former husband of Mari- 
lyn Miller, recently married to Mary Mul- 
hern; born in Toronto, Canada. Write 
him at United Artists Studio. Assistant 
director in Mary Pickford's Studio. 
Former star. Ill health has kept him 
from working as a player. 

POWELL, WILLIAM: divorced fron non- 
professional; born in Kent City, Missouri. 
Write him at Paramount Studio. Con- 
tract star. Jim Nelson in "Shadow of the 
Law." William Foster in "For the 
Defense." Now working as star of "New 
Morals." 

PRINGLE, AILEEN: married to non-pro- 
fessional. Born in San Francisco. Write 
her at M-G-M Studio. Free lance player. 
Featured role in "Dream of Love." 

O'NEIL, SALLY: unmarried; born in Bayonne, 
N. J. Write her at Columbia Studio. 
Free lance player. Co-starred with her 
sister, Molly O'Day in "Sisters," Colum- 
bia. Now on vaudeville tour. 

PAGE, PAUL: unmarried; born in Chicago, 
Illinois. Write him at First National 
Studio. Free lance player. Alan Ward 
the young attorney, in "The Naughty 
Flirt," First National. 

PALLETTE, EUGENE: unmarried; born in 
Winfield, Kansas. Write him at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract player. Square 
Deal McCarthy in "The Sea God." Pierre 
in "The Playboy of Paris." Now working 
as Hyacinth Nitouche in "Sea Legs." 

PATRICOLA, TOM: write him at Educational 
Studio. Free lance comedian. Comedy 
role in "Words and Music," Fox. Now 
being starred in series of two-reelers for 
Educational. 

OUARTERO, NINA: unmarried; born in 
Mexico. Write her at James Cruze Stu- 
dio. Free lance player. Feminine leads in 
"The Eternal Woman," Columbia. 
"Frozen River" and "One Stolen Night," 
Warner Bros. 

OUILLAN, EDDIE: unmarried; born in Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Write him at Pathe Studio. 
Contract star. Stellar roles in "The 
Sophomore," and "Up And At 'Em," 
Pathe. Now working as Will Musher in 
"Night Work." 

REVIER, DOROTHY: unmarried; born in 
San Francisco. Write her at Columbia 
Studio. Contract player. Feminine leads 
in "The Iron Mask," United Artists; 
"Flight," "Ladies of Leisure," "Sub- 
marine," all Columbia. Now playing 
feminine lead in "Dirigible," Columbia. 

ROGERS, CHARLES BUDDY: unmarried; 
born in Olathe, Kansas. Write him at 
Paramount. Contract star. Jerry Downs 
in "Follow Thru." Starred in "Heads 
Up." Now working as Larry Brooks in 
"Along Came Youth," all Paramount. 

ROLLINS, DAVID: unmarried; born in Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 1 ' Write him at Fox Studio. 
Contract player. Has been working as 
juvenile lead for the last four months in 
"The Big Trail." Male lead in "Love, 
Live, and Laugh,." Juvenile lead in 
"Black Watch." 

ROTH, LILLIAN: unmarried; born in Bos- 
ton, Mass. Write her at Paramount 
Studio. Contract player. Cora Falkern 
in "Honey." Arabella Rittenhouse in 
"Animal Crackers." Now working as 
Adrienne in "Sea Legs." 

ROGERS, WILL: married to a non-profes- 
sional; born in Olagah, Indian territory. 
Write him at Fox Studio. Contract star. 
Stellar role in "They Had to See Paris." 
Stellar role in "So This Is London." 
Now working as Lightnin' Bill in "Light- 
nin'." All for Fox. 

SEEGAR, MARIAM: unmarried; born in In- 
diana. Write her at Warner Brothers 
Studio. Free lance player. Feminine 
lead opposite Richard Dix in "The Love 
Doctor." 

RICH, IRENE: married to David Blankenhorn, 
multi-millionaire ship owner and realtor; 
born in Buffalo, N. Y. Write her at Fox 
Studio. Free lance plaver. Wife roles in 
"They Had to See Paris," "So This Is 
London." Now playing a mother role in 
"Lightnin'." 

ROGERS, GINGER: unmarried: born in Inde- 
pendence, Mo. Write her at Paramount 
Studio. Contract player. Puff Randolph 
in "Young Man of Manhattan"; Polly 
Rockwell in "Queen High"; Ellen Saun- 
ders in "The Sap from Syracuse." Now 
working as Mary in "Manhattan Mary." 

ROLAND, GILBERT: unmarried; born in Chi- 
huahua, Mexico. Write him at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract player. Stellar role in 
"Monsieur Le Fox," M-G-M. 

(Continued on page 128) 



The Modern Screen Magazine 



"Am I My Brother's Keeper? 



n 



(Continued from page 119) 



Mary, a resident of Clarksburg, Term. 
Now she is paying for Mary's educa- 
tion in Scripps College for Women at 
Pomona, California. 

T ILLIAN ROTH and her sister, Ann, 
' formed a kid vaudeville team when 
Lillian was five and Ann was three 
years old. The team was split when 
"Lillian went on the New York legit- 
imate stage, from which she was sent 
to Hollywood by Paramount. Now she 
is getting Ann a start in the studios, 
having won her an important role in 
"Madame Satan" and another in "The 
Little Cafe." 

Lila Lee has set aside a fund for the 
education of the two young children of 
her sister, Mrs. Peggy Tuttle, of Col- 
umbus, Ohio. 

TT was the "break" given him by his 
*■ sister, Norma, that led to Douglas 
Shearer becoming one of the highest- 
salaried technical men in the studios. 
He is chief sound engineer for Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer. 

Norma hadn't yet reached stardom 
when she found a place for Douglas as 
an assistant director. Then she saw 
to it that he was transferred to other 
departments that he might learn some- 
thing of every branch of the business. 

tpVER since Charles Rogers played his 
first role on the silversheet, it has 
been his ambition to have his brother, 
Bruce, join him. But first he wanted 



the younger member of the family to 
have two years at college. 

Last Fall, Bruce entered the Univer- 
sity of Kansas, Charles' Alma Mater. 
During the winter he was stricken with 
pneumonia. When he was brought to 
California to recuperate, Charles re- 
lented and decided Bruce could start 
his film career as soon as he was well. 
Now he's under contract to Paramount. 

When Jobyna Ralston was playing 
opposite Harold Lloyd she told me she 
had two ambitions — to be a great mo- 
tion picture star and to make a real man 
of her brother, Eddy "Buddy" Ralston, 
whom she adored. 

Her first desire has never been ful- 
filled, but she did rear "Buddy" in the 
proper way. She sent him through 
high school, then through the Univer- 
sity of California. 

He now holds a highly-paid position 
in the business of First National Pic- 
tures. 

Dick Heermance, brother of June 
Collyer, wanted to learn studio opera- 
tion methods, so June brought him to 
Hollywood and obtained employment for 
him in Tec-Art studios. 

The first thing Joan Crawford did 
wdien she brought her brother, Hal Le 
Seuer, to Hollywood from Kansas City, 
was to purchase a small house for him, 
provide him with an automobile and 
see to it that he got in pictures. 

Truly, the stars are their brother's 
keepers. But how few people realize it. 



Beauty Advice 

(Continued from page 104) 



wavy kind — you can put the waves wher- 
ever you want them. Well, of course, it 
does take a bit of practice — but what 
doesn't? 

DIET IS EXPENSIVE! 

And now, having saved a few of those 
nickels, dimes, quarters and even dollars 
that just seem to melt away on beauty 
preparations, let us consider a beauty prob- 
lem which really is expensive. I mean 
dieting — sane and sensible dieting. 

No, indeed — dieting isn't a simple mat- 
ter of going without food. It's a matter 
of eating the proper kind of food, syste- 
matically following the proper course of 
exercise, and engaging a competent mas- 
seuse. It involves a visit to your physician 
to find out if your health is good enough 
to allow you to diet. Even if you only 
wish to take off that ten pounds around 
the tummy and hips, it takes forethought, 
money, and time. 

And you cannot — you must not — try to 
diet economically. It will endanger your 
health, as you may have heard before. Nor 
must you follow any of those idiotic diet 
plans of lettuce and beans, buttermilk and 
carrots or whatnot. You've heard them 
praised to the skies, of course. "My dear, 
she ate nothing but tomatoes and drank 
cider for a month and now she's as slim 
as a sylph!" Mmm — and just about as 



human as a sylph, I'll be bound. 

I must cite my own pet example of what 
I don't mean by sensible dieting. I know 
a lovely lady who, this time last year was 
heading rapidly for the two hundred and 
fifty pound class. You'll just have to 
believe me when I tell you that she's now 
one hundred pounds lighter. And she 
seems to be in perfect health and looks 
marvelous. How? Champagne and milk 
of magnesia! Did you ever? Well, the 
lady had a great deal of money and noth- 
ing on earth to do but get thin and her 
physician prescribed that very bizarre diet 
— with only one meal a week, mind you. 
Yes, it sounds crazy to me, too, but it 
worked. 

Obviously, however, that is a very im- 
practical method and far from a sensible 
one. You have, yourself, doubtless, heard 
of equally outrageous diet plans and per- 
haps have been tempted to follow them 
yourself. Don't ever do it ! 

Therefore, if you have to work in an 
office, or manage a house, or simply dash 
about to social events, for heaven's sake 
get your doctor to prescribe your diet. 
Then stick to it. And go to a gymnasium, 
regularly and faithfully. And find a mas- 
seuse who knows his business and visit him 
twice a week. Spend as much as necessary 
and do without the manicures and sham- 
poos and unnecessarily expensive per- 
fumes till your diet bill is paid. 




iSBrimma tian 

Do you use discrimina- 
tion in the small matter of select- 
ing hairpins? 

The way you dress your hair 
explains your type more surely than any 
other sign. Whether waves are tucked 
close onto your ear, or drawn away from 
your brow • • • their manners 
express the real you. 
<J Naturally, then, you want 
them to slay put. Sta-Rite 
Hairpins will do it for you. 

Send I Oc direcl 
to us for full package, any one 
Style. - Or ask at stores. 



StaEite Hair Pin Q) 

Shelby^ille , Illinois 



Ma- 




Keep l cr Wires 
Off the Floor! 



1 The new easy way! A neat job instantly. No dam- 
age to woodwork. No tools needed. Set of eight 
colored clips to match your corda, 10c. 

JUSTHITE PUSH CLIP 

10 cents 

at Kresge's 



FITS BACK OF BASEBOARD OR MOULDING 



LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICES 

168 pages of radio bargains. New 1931 Screen 
Grid, all-electric, A. C. Sets in beautiful Con- 
soles — also battery operated sets. Write today. 

ALLIED RADIO CORPORATION 
711 W. LAKE ST. DEPT. 37 CHICAGO 




AGENTS: *8 A DAY 

Everybody needs food. Our 
wonderful new plan gives cus- 
tomers better quality and lower 
prices. Men and women Repre- 
sentatives wanted now. §8 a 
day and Free Ford Tudor Sedan 
to producers. No experience or 
capital required. 350 
ZANOL Products — all 
fast sellers. Pure Food 
Products, Toilet Prepa- 
rations, Soaps, etc. All 
needed in every home. Big 
orders. Big profits. Steady 
repeat business. Write quick. 

American Products Co. 
6104 Monmouth Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 



CLEAN 

FALSE TEETH 



Plates and Bridgework with HOPE 
DENTURE CLEANSER. Recom- 
mended by Dentist to clean, beau- 
tify and sterilize false teeth plates. 
Heals sore gums, corrects bad 
breath, gives natural appearance to 
false teeth. 

S YOUR FALSE TEETH PLATE 
LOOSE? Hope Denture Powder holds 
olates tight in the mouth — so snug 
they can't rock, drop or be played with. 

TRIAL SIZES CLEAN- 
SER OR POWDER, 10c 
EACH — at the better S & 
10c store?, larger sizes at 
Drug and Dept. Stores. If 
your dealer cannot supply 
you we will — send stamps. 
Dept. F-10 

HOPE DENTURE CO., New York 




127 




Bert Wheeler and Robert Woofsey seem to be getting it in the neck from 
John Rutherford. They're all in "Half Shot at Sunrise." 

The Modern Screen Directory 

(Players) 

(Continued from page 126) 



SOHILDKRAUT, JOSEPH: divorced from 
Elise Bartlett; born in Vienna, Austria. 
Write him at Universal Studio. Free lance 
player. The gambler in "Show Boat." 
Universal. Lead in "Cock of the Walk." 

SCOTT, FRED: unmarried, born Fresno, 
Calif. Write him at Pathe Studio. Con- 
tract star. Gerry in "Swing High." Now 
working as Fred Brandon in "Beyond 
Victory." 

SEBASTIAN, DOROTHY: unmarried; born in 
Birmingham, Ala. Write her at M-G-M 
Studio. Free lance player. Featured role 
in "The Single Standard," M-G-M Studio; 
feminine lead in "Morgan's Last Raid," 
M-G-M; featured role in "Our Blushing 
Brides," M-G-M. Now working in fea- 
tured role in "Dirigible," Columbia. 

SMITH, STANLEY: unmarried; born in 
Kansas City, Mo. Write him at Para- 
mount Studio. Contract player. Jerry 
Hamilton in "Love Among the Million- 
aires." Dick Johns in "Queen High." 
Now working in "Manhattan Mary," all 
for Paramount. 

SEGAL, VIVIENNE: unmarried; born in 
White Plains, N. Y. Write her at Warner 
Bros. Studio. Free lance player. Prima- 
donna role in "The Song of the West," 
"Golden Dawn," "Bride of the Regi- 
ment," all First National. 

SHEARER, NORMA: married to Irving Thal- 
berg; born in Montreal, Canada. Write 
her at M-G-M Studio. Contract star. 
Jerry in "The Divorcee." Betty in "Let 
Us Be Gay." 

SPARKS, NED: unmarried; born in St. 
Thomas, Ontario. Write him at RKO 
Studio. Contract player. Happy Winter 
in "Street Girl," Happy in "Love Comes 
Along," Winthrop Clavering in "The 
Conspiracy," and Dan Walsh in "The 
Fall Guy." 

SIDNEY, GEORGE: unmarried; born in Hun- 
gary. Write him at Universal Studio. 
Free lance player. Co-starred with 
Charles Murray in "The Cohens and 
Kellys in Scotland." Now co-starring in 
"The Cohens and Kellys in Ireland." 

SILLS, MILTON: married to Doris Kenyon. 
Born in Chicago, 111. Write him at Fox 
Studio. Contract star. Stellar role in 
' The Sea Wolf," Fox. Now working in 
stellar role in "Net Work." 

SKINNER, OTIS: married to non-professional. 
Write him at First National Studio. Con- 
tract star. Now working in stellar role in 
"Kismet." 

STONE, LEWIS: divorced from Florence Oak- 



ley. Born in Worcester, Mass. Write him 
at M-G-M Studio. Contract player. The 
Warden in "The Big House." Featured 
role in "Romance." Now working in 
"The Passion Flower," all M-G-M. 

STUART, NICK: married to Sue Carol; born 
in Roumania. Write him at Mack Sen- 
nett Studio. Free lance player. Juvenile 
lead in "Joy Street," Fox. Now being 
starred in a series of short comedies for 
Mack Sennett. 

SWANSON, GLORIA: separated from the 
Marquis de la Falaise de la Coudraye. 
Born in Chicago, 111. Write her at Pathe 
Studio. United Artists producer-star. 
Stellar roles in "The Trespasser" and 
"What a Widow." 

TASHMAN, LILYAN: married to Edmund 
Lowe. Born in New York City. Write her 
at Paramount Studio. Free lance player. 
Featured roles in "The Matrimonial Bed," 
Warner Bros.; "Leathernecking," RKO. 
Now working in featured role in "The 
Cat Creeps," Universal. 

TAYLOR, ESTELLE: married to Jack Demp- 
sey; born in Wilmington, Delaware. 
Write her at RKO Studio. Free lance 
player. Featured role in "Where East is 
East," M-G-M. Now working in featured 
role in "Cimarron" for RKO. 

TALMADGE, NORMA: married to Joseph 
Schenck; born in Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Write her at United Artists Studio. 
Producer-star. Stellar role In "The 
Woman Disputed," "New York Nights," 
and "Madame Du Barry," all United 
Artists. Now in Paris on a vacation. 

TEARLE, CONWAY: divorced from Adele 
Rowland, a professional; born in New 
York City. Write him at Warner Bros. 
Studio. Free lance player. Featured in 
roles in "Evidence" and "Gold Diggers of 
Broadway," both Warner Brothers. 

TALMADGE, RICHARD: unmarried; born in 
Des Moines, Iowa. Producer-star. Stellar 
role in "The Bachelor's Club" for General 
Pictures Corporation. Now working in an 
untitled production for Richard Talmadge 
Productions. 

TOOMEY, REGIS: married to non-profes- 
sional; born in Pittsburgh, Pa. Write him 
at Paramount Studio. Contract player. 
Bob Drexel in "The Light of Western 
Stars," Tom in "The Shadow of the Law." 
Just finished featured role in Warner's 
"The Steel Highway." 

TIBBETT, LAWRENCE: married to a non- 
professional; born in Bakersfield, Calif. 
Write him at M-G-M Studio. Contract 



star. Yegor In "The Rogue Song." Now 
working as co-star with Grace Moore in 

_ "The New Moon." Both M-G-M. 

TORRENCE, ERNEST: married to non- 
professional; born in Edinburgh, Scot- 
land. Write him at M-G-M Studio. Con- 
tract player. Featured role in "Strictly 
Unconventional." Now working in "Call 
of the Flesh." Both M-G-M. 

TORRES, RAOUEL: unmarried; born in 
Hermosillo, Mexico. Write her at M-G-M 
Studio. Contract player. Feminine leads 
in "White Shadows of the South Seas," 
and "The Sea Bat," M-G-M; "Under a 
Texas Moon," Warner Bros. 

TREVOR, HUGH: unmarried; born in Von- 
kers, N. Y. Write him at RKO Studio. 
Contract player. Bobby Murray in "The 
Night Parade," John Howell in "Con- 
spiracy," Billy in "The Cuckoos," Gregory 
Sloane in "The Midnight Mystery." Now 
working as Lieut. Jim Reed in "Half Shot 
At Sunrise." 

TRYON, GLENN: married to non-professional; 
born in Julietta, Idaho. Write him at 
Universal Studio. Free lance player. 
Featured roles in "It Can Be Done," 
"Broadway," and "The Kid's Clever," all 
for Universal. 

TWELVETREES, HELEN: divorced from Clark 
Twelvetrees; born in New York City. 
Write her at Pathe Studio. Contract star. 
Heroine of "Swing High" and "The 
Grand Parade." Star of "Her Man." 
Loaned to Universal for feminine lead of 
"The Cat Creeps," now in production. 
Next picture from original story of Joseph 
Santley who will direct it for Pathe. 

VALLI, VIRGINIA: unmarried; born in Chi- 
cago, HI. Write her at Fox Studio. Free 
lance player. Featured feminine roles in 
"The Isle of Lost Ships" and "Mr. An- 
tonio." 

VARCONI, VICTOR; married to Vienna ac- 
tress; born in Kisvard, Hungary. Write 
him at Warner Brothers Studio. Free 
lance player. Just finished male lead in 
"The Caballero," Warners. 

VELEZ, LUPE: unmarried; born in San 
Luis Potosi, Mexico. Write her at Uni- 
versal Studio. Contract star. Feminine 
leads in "Where East is East," M-G-M; 
"Tiger Rose,". Warner Bros.: "Hell's Har- 
bor," United Artists; starred in "The 
Storm," Universal. 

WHEELER, BERT: married to non-profes- 
sional; born in Patterson, N. J. Write him 
at RKO Studio. Contract player. Chick in 
"Rio Rita." Sparrow in "The Cuckoos." 
Peewee in "Dixiana." Now working as 
Tommy in "Half Shot at Sunrise," all 
RKO. 

WHITE, ALICE: unmarried; born in Patter- 
son, N. J. Write her at First National 
Studio. Free lance star. Stellar roles in 
"Show Girl in Hollywood" and "The 
Naughty Flirt," both First National. Now 
enjoying a vacation. 

WHITE, MARJORIE: married to Eddie Tier- 
ney; born in Oklahoma City, Okla. Fea- 
tured role in "Svenson's Wild Party" and 
"Happy Days." Now working opposite 
Frank Albertson in "Just Imagine." 

WILSON, LOIS: unmarried; born in Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. Write her at Warner Bros. 
Studio. Free lance player. Feminine 
leads in "Conquest," and "Kid Gloves," 
Warner Bros. "Once a Gentleman," 
James Cruze Productions. 

WOLHEIM, LOUIS: married to non-profes- 
sional; born in New York City. Write him 
at RKO Studio. Free lance player. Fea- 
tured role in "All Quiet on the Western 
Front," Universal. Starred in "Danger 
Lights," RKO. To become a director 
under his new RKO contract. 

WRIGHT, HELEN: unmarried; born in Flor- 
ence, Kansas. Write her at Universal 
Studio. Free lance player. Feminine 
lead in "Dames Ahoy, Universal. 

WITHERS, GRANT: married to Loretta 
Young. Born in Pueblo, Colo. Write him 
at Warner Bros. Studio. Contract player. 
Lead in "Dancing Sweeties." Now work- 
ing as Bill in "The Steel Highway." 

WOOLSEY, ROBERT: married to non-pro- 
fessional. Born in Oakland, Calif. Write 
him at RKO Studio. Contract player. 
Lovett in "Rio Rita." Prof. Bird in "The 
Cuckoos." Ginger in "Dixiana." Now 
working as Gilbert in "Half Shot at Sun- 
rise." 

WRAY, FAY: married to John Monk Saund- 
ers; born in Alberta, Canada. Write her 
at Paramount Studio. Contract player. 
Consuelo in "The Texan." Joan Randal 
in "The Border Legion." Now playing as 
Daisy in "The Sea God." 

YOUNG, LORETTA; married to Grant With- 
ers; born in Salt Lake City. Write her at 
First National Studio. Contract player. 
Elaine Bumpstead in "Broken Dishes," 
Phyllis Ericson in "The Truth About 
Youth." Recently finished featured role 
in "Kismet." 

YOUNG, ROLAND: unmarried; born in New 
York City. Write him at M-G-M Studio. 
Free lance player. Featured roles in "Her 
Private Life," First National; "The 
Bishop Murder Case," and "The Unholy 
Three," both M-G-M. 



128 



The Modern Screen Magazine 



The Gifts They Get 

(Continued from page 109) 



is a place for cigarettes and his feet 
hold a flat white tray. 

Louise Fazenda had a duck, Waddles, 
which was used in her first Mack Sen- 
nett comedies. The duck had a long 
career and then was retired to Miss 
Fazenda's back yard when it was too 
old to work. Waddles died last year 
and newspapers all over the country 
carried the story. Shortly after, Louise 
received two beautiful china ducks 
from an old woman in Buffalo, who 
suggested that they might decorate her 
garden as a permanent memorial to the 
popular Waddles. Two tiny cacti rep- 
resent another treasure of Miss Fa- 
zenda's. They were sent her by a miner 
in Idaho, who said he would like to 
have a bit of his beloved desertland 
planted in Louise's garden. 

OEFORE she went to Africa to play 
*7 the feminine lead in "Trader Horn," 
Edwina Booth received a regular del- 
uge of portable typewriters from her 
fans. Another unusual gift received 
by the blonde Edwina was a large and 
very fine elephant gun, a gift rarely if 
ever before received by young women 
of the screen. 

A tambourine from old Spain sent by 
a fan is Loretta Young's cherished 
gift, while Joe E. Brown's is the con- 
tainer that a home-made chocolate pie- 
sent him by a Cleveland girl — came in. 

A fan in Havana, Cuba, saw Phyllis 
Haver on the screen in "Tenth Ave- 
nue" and promptly sent her some very 
rare tropical fireflies ! 

From Hawaii came Dorothy Mac- 



kaill's most novel gift. It was a com- 
plete and very lovely Hawaiian cos- 
tume, sent by one of her staunchest ad- 
mirers. 

An elephant, hand-carved and a mag- 
nificent piece of art, is the fan gift that 
Estelle Taylor prizes above all others. 

Claud Allister was signed for 
* * "Bulldog Drummond," his second 
picture in Hollywood, he was told that 
he must wear a monocle. He had never 
worn one, didn't have one in his posses- 
sion and didn't know where to get' one. 
He started a tour of Hollywood optical 
shops, but one thing that Hollywood 
didn't have, it seemed, was monocles. 
From one shop to the next he went. 
People in the various stores looked 
amused at the Englishman asking for 
something that Americans seemed to 
think was in the bureau drawers of all 
Britishers. Allister returned home 
empty-handed. Two days later a pack- 
age arrived by mail from an admirer of 
Allister's who said he had been in a 
shop on the Boulevard when the actor 
was enquiring for a monocle. This fan 
remembered he had one among a lot of 
old things at home, had asked the opti- 
cian the full name and address of the 
actor, and was offering the monocle to 
him. Allister eagerly took possession 
of it and now he says he wouldn't give 
it up for any amount of money. 

These are only a few gifts stars re- 
ceive from fans. There are many, 
many more. And each and every one is 
fully appreciated. And that's just what 
they deserve to be ! 



Eavesdropping on Will Rogers 



(Continued from page 116) 



anyway, so they could see how beautiful 
it is. Then I have breakfast and hit for 
the studio. At noon-time I borry some 
specs from someone (I'm always for- 
gettin' my own) and read the paper so 
as I can write my daily comment for the 
next day's papers." 

"Where do you write it?" 

"Oh — anywhere I can find ' a type- 
writer or maybe in my coupe." 

"How do you get your ideas?" 

T_JE laughed. "I'll always get ideas 
as long as there's Congressmen. 
And when I get tired poking fun at 
them why then there's the Disarmament 
Conference and the League of Nations 
and Prohibition and other jokes. I just 
fool around till I fill up the column and 
then don't think about it anymore till 
next day at noon. Then after dinner I 
work again and then beat it for the 
ranch to try to get another game of 
polo in before supper and bed." 

"Is that all?" they asked. 

"Well— yes," drawled Will. "Except 



sometimes instead of playing polo I 
fool around with the lassoo or go for 
a airplane ride." 

"Can you pilot an airplane, Will ?" 

"Sure I could. Right down in a heap." 

/QUESTIONS and answers and 
laughter kept flying around the 
place. It was hard to catch all that was 
said. But I remember one certain ques- 
tion and answer that should be set down. 
It was when someone asked Will's ad- 
vice to those who are trying to break 
into the movies. 

Responded Will : "I advise anyone 
who wants to act in the movies to get a 
nice strong rope about ten feet long 
and take it out on a branch about 
twelve feet from the ground. Then they 
oughta tie one end of the rope to the 
branch and the other around their neck 
and sorta lose their balance. What hap- 
pened next would be best for every- 
body." 

That was the quip that sent them 
laughing from the table. 



WHEN YO 
HANDS 
IMPORT A 



UR 



ARE 




WELL GROOMED HANDS, 
shapely, lustrous nails 
are an asset always. F-O Nail 
Polish spreads evenly, and 
imparts a smooth, lasting finish 
which is not affected by water. 

Sold at chain stores, in Natural 
Pink, Dark Red or Colorless. Rons 
in silk stockings can be checked, 
invisibly, with Colorless F — O. 

FORT ORANGE CHEMICAL CO., ALBANY, N. Y, 



regular 
size 



BOYS AND GIRLS 

Earn Xmas Money 

Write for 50 Sets St. Nicholas Christmas 
Seals. Sell for 10c a set. When sold 
send us $3.00 and you keep $2.00 for 
yourself. No work — Just Fun! 
ST. NICHOLAS SEAL CO., Dept. 880-M, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Beautiful Complexion 

IN 15 DAYS 

Clear your complexion of pimpleg, blackheads, 
whiteheads, red spots, enlarged pores, oily skin 
and other blemishes. I can give you a com- 
plexion soft, rosy, clear, velvety beyond your 
fondest dream. And I do it in a few days. My 
method is different. No cosmetics, lotions, 
salves, soaps, ointments, plasters, bandages, 
masks, vapor sprays, massage, rollers or other 
implements. No diet, no fasting. Nothing to 
take. Cannot Injure the most delicate skin. 
Send for my Free Booklet. You are not obli- 
gated. Send no money. Just get the facts. 

Dorothy Ray, 646 N. Michigan Blvd., Dept. 3880, Chicago 





129 



HpHIS is just a tip. to all the girls who 
think they would like to come out 
to Hollywood and go in the movies : 
There are three girl-waitresses in 
Henry's who used to do extra work in 
pictures. Their salary on an average 
was $15 weekly. Tips included, they 
are now earning $100 weekly in this 
Hollywood restaurant waiting on tables. 

^ % ^ 

rHE skeptics who doubt the artistic 
hobbies of film, stars can take our 
word for it that Joan Crawford de- 
signed all the costumes zvorn by the Al- 
bertina Rasch ballet girls in "Our 
Blushing Brides." 

Joan puts this talent to use at home, 
too. She and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., 
have a budget and they adhere to it 
strictly. One of Joan's economies is 
designing her own clothes. She has 
them made by a dressmaker and at a 
surprisingly small expense. In fact, 
the complete cost of one of her latest 
elaborate gozvns was just $10.31. 



Film Gossip 

(Continued from page 118) 

I^VER since Garbo started the fad of 
being a "myth" to her public, sev- 
eral other Hollywood stars have tried 
to pull the same idea by refusing to see 
newspaper or fan magazine reporters. 

Constance Bennett is the latest to join 
this fast growing brigade. Just re- 
cently she notified her press agent that 
she would make no more appointments 
with the press. Connie, it is said, Is 
very dissatisfied with the type of pub- 
licity she has been receiving. Especi- 
ally with the stories to the effect that 
she spends $250,000 yearly on clothes — 
and that "every girl should marry at 
least one millionaire." 

John Barrymore has been refusing in- 
terviews for a year. 

Joe E. Brown is another man who is 
not eager to welcome the press. And 
of course, there's John Gilbert. 

* * * 

Jackie Coogan received $7,500 iveekly 
for his appearance in "Tom Sawyer." 



UOLLYWOOD sob sisters did their 
best to try to promote bad feelings 
between Bebe Daniels and Marilyn Mil- 
ler, respectively, the present wife, and 
the former girl-friend of Ben Lyon, by 
reporting that Marilyn fainted at the 
Daniels-Lyon wedding. The idea being 
that she was broken hearted. 

In spite of the embarrassment occa- 
sioned by these stories Bebe and 
Marilyn have become the best of friends. 
They dine and lunch together several 
times weekly. 

VyALLACE BEERY and Arita 
* " Mary Beery have decided to go 
their own way after seven years of what 
Hollywood believed to be a very happy 
married life. 

So far neither Beery nor his wife 
have any definite statement to make re- 
garding their trouble. 

"I am living in a Hollywood apart- 
ment by myself," said Wally to a news- 
paper reporter. "My wife has gone 
away — I don't think she is returning." 

* * * 

Buddy Rogers is a gallant 
youth. Recently he was seen 
dancing gracefully in a slow-time 
waltz with a white-haired lady 
who looked like some one's 
mother. 

* * * 






Handsome Lewis Ayres and cute Joan Marsh go in for 
water sports on the Universal lot. 



130 



f~l RAUMAN's Chinese Theatre will 
• introduce the most unique curtain 
of theatre history with the opening of 
"The Big Trail." This "drop" designed 
by the Spanish artist, Xavier Cugat, de- 
picts all the famous personalities of 
Hollywood in colored caricature. 

Every effort at secrecy has sur- 
rounded this curtain. Very few people 
have seen this work of art, or know 
much about it. They seem to be hold- 
ing it for a big surprise. 



\\^HEN is a vacation not a vacation? 
v v When you have to stop off in Chi- 
cago and take street scenes for a new 
picture, is William Powell's answer to 
that one. 

Bill was just passing through on his 
way back to Hollywood after three 
months in Europe when the studio 
wired him to stand by for local atmos- 
phere shots for his next picture, "New 
Morals." 



ZJOLLYWOOD isn't taking much 
slock in the rumored romance be- 
Hvecn Clara Bow and Rex Bell. Clara 
still seems to be very interested in 
Harry Richvian, at least to the extent 
of liking to talk about him and muse 
over the general "fun" of knowing him. 

Rex is quite insistent that Clara never 
was in love with Harry. "They were 
just good friends," he explains noncha- 
lantly. "Perhaps Harry did fall pretty 
hard for Clara, but I don't think there 
was ever any real interest on her part." 

Art Color Printing Company, Dunellen, N. J, 



E The LATEST 




ALBUM 



of the 

CREEN 



STARS 




KR E S S; A N C 



A NEW AND AUTHORITATIVE 
VOLUME on "WHO'S WHO" m 
e Pictures and What They Have 
Done with Photographs of the Stars 

Containing sixty-four pages of exclusive 
photographs, beautifully reproduced, and 
facts concerning the foremost personalities 
of the screen— where they were born, how 
they became picture players, whom they 
married, where they live and other fasci- 
nating biographical details that have not 
before appeared in print. 

Every film fan will want to own a copy 
of Screen Romances ALBUM and be 
in the "know" about talking-screen 
personalities. 



T H E S -S K R E S G E' ^iC Q M PtA^N ) 
A W&l <;G 6 M P A N V . S t O E < 




^ou don't have to learn to like them 



HPHE brilliant, breathless "get-away" of a star back 
brings the crowd to its feet by a common impulse. 

Equally natural and spontaneous is the response 
of smokers to Chesterfield's satisfying goodness, its 
wholesome smoothness. 

No one ever has to "acquire" a taste for Chesterfield. 



Smokers take to its pleasing flavor instinctively. 

. . . And here's why: Chesterfield takes the 
sure, undeviating course to the one goal that 
counts in a cigarette — fragrant mildness and a 
ripened richness, without a hint of harshness or 
irritation. In short 



MILDER a*ul BETTER TASTE 

Chesterfield 



© 1930, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



b 



p